A replica hypothesis for Rossi’s E-Cat: Method to simulate an apparent self-sustained system or COP>1

Revision 1: 25/06/2016

Abstract
This article describes a system that is able to provide a possible conventional explanation (not necessarily the only one) about the “self-sustained” phenomenon observed in the E-Cat steam-generator. During a few tests performed on the above-mentioned E-Cat system an anomalous water steam production was reported and confirmed by a number of observers.

The proposed system also allows explaining:

  • How a steam generator is able to produce overheated steam in unusual stable manner
  • How in the self-sustained regime (input power switched off) for a short period the quantity of steam produced does not undergo any considerable reduction and a steam temperature increase  can even be detected
  • How, without further modifications, with a joint production of a small amount of steam and [mostly] water in liquid form at 100°C it is possible to measure an apparent output power to input power ratio (commonly defined as COP) equal to 7

As the article is only a case study, the system dimensions are not considered critical, as dimensions of the real E-Cat changed several times during the years.

Working principle
The working principle of the system is described as follows:  the electrical resistance does not heat directly the water mass contained into the generator chamber, but only via a mass of high thermal capacity; the water mass receives the thermal energy through the insulating layer surrounding the thermal mass. Once the system reaches the steady state regime, the insulation layer allows to maintain the thermal mass at high temperature,  in the order of 700-1000°C, and the outer surface of the insulating layer at a temperature slightly higher  than 100°C.

Description
In Figure 1 the drawing section of the steam generator system is shown.

Figura 1

Figure 1

Figure 1 shows the drawing section of the steam generator system. The system dimensions are shown and are not considered critical the goal being only to demonstrate the possibility to have an apparently  self-sustaining set-up.

In the figure, the following elements appear:

  1. External system housing (AISI304)
  2. water inlet pipe
  3. steam outlet pipe
  4. thermal mass (AISI304)
  5. electrical cartridge heating elements, (n. 4 450W each)
  6. thermal insulation (kaolin wool)
  7. thermal mass housing (AISI304)
  8. input power supply cable
  9. aluminum fin heat exchanger (PFHE)
  10. temperature probe

If we consider a system with a square section fully filled chamber contains 14 liters of water, whereas  in the case that the chamber is filled just until the level indicated in the drawing it contains about 8 liters of water. The thermal mass of [200]x[200]x[20] mm is about 6.5 kg.

Dimensioning
As an example, in steady state regime, a 1800 W electrical input power of, in absence of anomalous phenomena, produces about 3 kg/h of steam. To provide an indication, in the following link a small video related to a steam jet of 7 kg/h slightly overheated is shown:

When the electrical resistances are switched off for a short period, the heat accumulated into the thermal mass maintains the system in apparent constant thermal power supply; then the mass will cool down (continuing to supply approximately 1800W, without receiving any energy by the electrical resistances).
The evolution of the system temperature T is described by the energy balance of thermal mass:

where m is the thermal mass, cp the specific heat, h the heat transfer coefficient and  A the exchange surface.

The solution is:

It is easily seen that we can model the cooling phase to a RC circuit, where:

  • the heat capacity is equivalent to the capacitor
  • the thermal resistance is equivalent to electrical resistance
  • the heat is equivalent to the electric charge
  • the temperature is equivalent to the voltage

The thermal resistance R can be assumed constant under the following assumptions: constant water level inside the steam generator and heat transfer coefficient weakly dependent on temperature.

Assuming the thermal mass made of 6.5 kg stainless steel , a 900°C initial temperature and the system in equilibrium (steam produced equivalent to a power of 1800W or 1550 kcal/h), the thermal capacity of the mass is estimated to be:

C = 0.12 * 6.5 = 0.78 kcal/°C

where 0.12 kcal/kg °C is the specific heat of stainless steel.

The thermal mass temperature in the cooling phase is described by the following equation:

T(t) = TL + ΔT0 * e-(t/RC)

where R is the thermal resistance, between the mass and boiling water, and C the thermal capacity (0.78 kcal/°C = 3260 J/°C); TL is the asymptotic temperature (when time goes to infinity), in this case 100°C.
The thermal resistance is equal to:

R = (900-100)/1550 = 0.51 h°C/kcal

During the self-sustained phase, the thermal mass temperature evolution  vs. time is:

T(t) = 100 + 800 * e-[t / (0.51 x 0.78)]

and after 30 minutes (0.5 hours) the temperature is:

T(t) = 100 + 800 * e -(0.5 / 0.40) = 330°C

The quantity of steam produced after 30 minutes is:

Q = Q(0) * (330 – 100) / (900-100) = 0.28 * Q(0)

This simply means that, after 30 minutes,  the system is still producing overheated steam, altough with a throughput reduced to about a quarter of  the initial one, a quantity, however, not negligible.
Based on the previously calculated thermal resistance, assuming negligible the thermal resistance between the outer surface of the housing and the water mass, the thickness of the insulation required between the mass and the housing can be approximately estimated.
Assuming the housing surface of 0.12 m2 and the insulation made of pressed kaolin-wool (with an average thermal conductivity λ = 0.1 W/m°C in the temperature range 100 to 900 °C ), the thickness turns out to be:

s = λ * S * ΔT / P = 0.1 * 0.12 * 800 / 1800 = 0.0053m = 5.3mm

where s = thickness; P = power; λ = thermal conductivity; S = surface and ΔT = temperature difference.

Temperature of the housing box
The thermal mass is at a high temperature, while the housing box (indicated by 7 in Figure 1) is at a much lower temperature thanks to the thermal insulation layer (indicated with 6 in Figure 1) and the high heat transfer coefficient with the surrounding water.

It is worth to distinguish between the housing parts in contact with water and the housing top cover in thermal contact with the aluminum plate-fin heat exchanger (PFHE).

Assuming that the water level is just at the base of the PFHE, considering the following diagram (extracted from F. Kreith – Principles of heat transfer), the temperature of the housing surface in contact with water can be estimated, without performing  complex calculations on convective heat transfer.

 

Figura 2

Figure 2

 

The bottom and laterals surfaces of the housing box are about  2/3 of the overall surface. Since the cross heat transfer of the walls is negligible, it can be assumed that 2/3 of the thermal power (1200 W) is transferred to water by a surface of 0.08 m2. The heat flux through that surface is 15,000 W/m2 or 13,000 kcal/hm2; considering the diagram previously shown  it is possible to deduce that the boiling phenomenon is in pure convective zone or at most in the top of nuclei boiling zone. Nevertheless, the temperature difference between the water mass (100°C) and the housing surfaces is extremely low, definitely less than 5°C.

As before mentioned, the case of the top housing box in contact with aluminum PFHE is different. Assuming that the PFHE exchanges heat only with steam (water level just below the PFHE) the remaining power of 600W is transferred only to the steam mass. Considering a steam production of about 2 kg/h, even assuming the exchange surface extremely high, the temperature of PFHE and overheated steam is:

T = 100 + 600 * 0.86 / (2 x 0.46) = 660 °C

being the specific heat of steam about  0.46 kcal/kg°C in the operating conditions.

In order to maintain the temperature of the PFHE below a critical level, it is necessary that part of the heat be exchanged with water as well. Therefore, the PFTE must be partially covered with water. In this way, the PFTE temperature can be controlled in the range of 110-115°C, with the aim to produce overheated  steam. It is worth to notice that by a common thermal-controller it would be possible to set simultaneously the output temperature of overheated steam and water level into chamber, as it will be further explained in details in the next paragraphs.

Output temperature of steam
The output steam temperature is a point that caused many debates inside the community. A number of observers, present during the test, claimed that the steam temperature was higher than 100°C and stated that the temperature measurement was performed at atmospheric pressure; according to the above, the conclusion is that the system produced overheated steam. Part of the technical community challenged this statement, because an overheated steam generator would be extremely unstable: a small variation in water flow rate or in the input power (or hypothetically in an internal exothermic  reaction) would affect strongly the output steam temperature; although the observers stated that the system was very stable.

The system proposed in this document enables to produce overheated steam in a very stable manner, this is thanks to the presence of a plate-fin heat exchanger (PFHE), indicated by 9 in Figure 1, located on the top of the heating chamber and only partially covered from water. The PFHE model used is assumed to be Elbomec S-220 type. The steam, released from the water interface, is overheated passing through the PFHE; the steam temperature depends on the steam mass flow rate and the PFHE area . Considering the large area of the PFHE surface and the reduced quantity of produced  steam, the PFHE temperatures and the output steam are very close each other.

In self-sustaining regime, the resistances are switched off, while maintaining the water pump running, and a slow decreasing of steam temperature is expected. Actually, in case a thermostat controls the water level, the steam temperature will stay constant for long period, as shown in the “Dimensioning” part: what will decrease with time is only the steam production. It is worth to notice that increasing the set point in the thermostat (manual or automatic) could even simulate an increase of the output steam temperature.

Water level control
The water level into chamber is fundamental  for to get a proper  simulation of a “self-sustaining” phase. A too low water level could overheat the aluminum plate-fin heat exchanger (PFEH). Conversely, a too high water level can cooling the PFEH too much, thus reducing the steam output temperature that, in this case, would be no longer overheated.

As already mentioned, the water level may be controlled by a level sensor, anyway a start/stop feedback controller on a fix temperature set-point of the outlet steam (typically 110 ° C) appears to be a simple and perfectly working control method. In this case, in order to avoid dangerous overheating during the heating start-up phase, it is necessary to fill the chamber until the water reaches the thermal mass housing bottom.

To prove that the proposed regulation method is easy to implement and able to maintain stable water level and temperature, the reaction time of such control system is estimated below.

Assuming that the water level drops below the aluminum plate-fin heat exchanger, temperature starts to increase as a result of the input thermal power of about 600W received from the insulating material that separates the thermal mass.  In this condition, the PFHE transfer a very small heat to the surrounding steam (assuming the output steam temperature of 110°C the estimated thermal exchanged power is approximately 30W). The mass of the PFHE is about 3kg, the specific heat of aluminum is of 0.24 kcal/kg°C; the temperature-increasing rate of the aluminum PFHE is approximately:

ΔT / t = 600 * 0.86 / 3 * 0.24 = 716 °C/h = 0.2 °C/s

This means that, a control system having a reaction time less than 5 seconds would cause temperature fluctuations of 1°C. A normal ON/OFF controller on the pump, with feedback signal from the output steam temperature (110 °C), can be easily used.

Steady state time
The time to achieve a steady state is certainly increased by the thermal mass. However, contrarily to what can be assumed, most likely not all the water inside the generator is at 100°C; as a consequence, the energy transferred to the thermal mass is partially compensated by the fact that only a part of the water is heated.

The heater is located in the upper part of the steam generator, contrary to what happens in a common boiler, which is heated from the bottom.  In a boiler, the water shows an almost uniform temperature due to the internal convective flow; while, in the described system, convective flows  are practically absent and the only stirring effect is caused by the small steam bubbles developed on the external parts of the thermal mass housing. From the Figure 2 one can be deduce that boiling is practically absent in the liquid bulk  and mainly located in the surface contacting the housing; it is plausible to conclude that the water at the bottom of the generator chamber remains at a temperature not much higher than the input one.

The steady states time can be estimated considering the total energy required to get the thermal mass at 900°C and to bring to 100°C a portion of water, assumed to be of 4 liters.

The description of  a system in a dynamic regime requires rigorous calculations and it is very complex, so only a rough estimation is showed below:

  • Energy supplied to thermal mass = 6.5 * 900 * 0.12 = 700 kcal
  • Energy supplied to water = 4 * 80 = 320 kcal
  • Total energy supplied = 700 + 320 = 1020 kcal
  • Time to provide such energy = 1020/ (1800 * 0.86) = 0.65 h = 40 minutes

Considering that in the meanwhile, the energy is being transferred to the developed steam, it is possible to conclude that the system achieve approximately the steady state regime after about  1 hour (it is necessary to clarify that in theory the steady state is achieved at infinite time). The steam production instead will start well before, as soon as the external housing surface exceed 100°C.

System stability
Contrary to what might be expected, a stable production of overheated steam could therefore be possible, even considering fluctuations of either input power or water flow rate.

For example, a sudden 10% decrease of power, from 1800W to 1600W, is analyzed (similar approach can be applied to increasing power). The temperature-decreasing rate of the thermal mass is:

dT/dt = ΔP / C = (1800 – 1600) / 3260 = 0.06 °C/s = 3.6 °C/minute

Therefore, to reduce by  50°C the thermal mass temperature, a 15 minutes are required; such a  temperature drop is negligible compared to the initial 900°C temperature and would cause an output steam temperature variation of less than 1°C.

Now a pump breakdown is analyzed. In this case, as previously shown the temperature of the aluminum plate-fin heat exchanger increases with a rate of 0.2°C/s and could achieve a critical temperature of 300°C after 15 minutes. However,  the temperature of the thermal mass would decrease as well,  and considering that, in this condition, the heat exchange with the steam (which would be highly overheated) would be very important, it can be said that the system would cool down without any part reaching temperatures able to cause damages.

In conclusion, the system can be controlled easily and by hands, without any fast feedback loop.

Simulation of COP = 7
The described system is able to simulate an output thermal power 7 times higher than the input power (COP = 7).

Assuming a system in steady state regime and the 25°C temperature for inlet water is, the about  3 kg/h of slightly overheated steam can be produced. Let us now assume to increase 6 times the water flow rate , up to 18 l/h.

The heat required  to bring the water at boiling temperature (100 °C) is:

Q = 18 * (100 – 25) = 1350 kcal/h = 1570W

Since the supplied input power is 1800 W, it is sufficient to bring the water at boiling and further to produce a small amount of steam (in absence of thermal dissipation the steam production is estimated to be 0.4 kg/h).

The main point is that most of the inlet water is not vaporized, but flows out from the output pipe (3 in Figure 1) at a temperature of 100°C.

In these conditions, a temperature probe introduced in the upper part of the steam generator chamber would measure a value of 100°C or slightly higher, giving the wrong impression that the system is producing steam in large quantities while in reality only water at 100°C is flowing out.

According to what has been said above, the output thermal power can be [wrongly] estimated based on the following (1800W input power):

Q = 18 * (75 + 545) = 11160 kcal/h = 12970 W

Apparently a value equal to a COP = 7.

As already mentioned, in the described system, temperature and level controls are not required, being sufficient to provide a constant input pump flow rate of about 18 l/h. A small reduction of the flow rate would not have any relevant effect as  the system would continue to work properly, only showing a slightly reduced apparent COP, since more steam is produced. On the contrary, increasing the water flow rate, more than 5%, could cool  the water below 100°C, a decreasing that for example was observed in the following Report that refers to a test executed in Jan ’11 (screen shot of collected data), as shown in Figure 3.

Figura 3

Figure 3

It is worth to notice how it would be enough to extend the outlet pipe in the steam generator chamber roughly until the water level, as shown in fig 4, to obtain an apparent steam production with a COP = 7 and simultaneously to measure a much higher temperature than 100°C into the chamber.

Figura 4

Figure 4

In this configuration during the self-sustained phase the aluminum plate-fin heat exchanger would remain partially not covered from water, as consequence it could achieve a temperature higher than 100°C allowing to overheat the small quantity of steam produced.

Heating resistors
The only critical commercial component of the system is the heating resistance;  in fact, this element has to work at very high temperatures and therefore with a high risk of failure due to local overheating.

In Figure 1 cartridge heater elements appropriate for this application are shown. The most common electrical resistances available in the market are able to operate with a surface temperature up to 750°C and a surface power density of 50W/cm2, but specific models can operate continuously over 1000°C (e.g. cartridge heaters made of boron nitride from TRE C co. Segrate (MI); 12.5, 14 and 16 mm standard diameters are available).

In the drawing n. 4 resistors, each 450 W of power, 12.5mm diameter and 200 mm long are indicated. The surface power density is less than 6 W/cm2, which is almost 10 times less than the maximum allowable. This over-sizing allows operating with isolated resistors (made in boron nitride) at extremely high surface temperatures, even considerably higher than 1000°C and guarantees that in each point of the stainless steel  block the temperature is almost identical to the surface of the heater elements. In fact, considering the dimensions shown in Figure 1 and that the thermal conductivity of stainless steel is about 17 W/m°C, the maximum temperature difference estimated in the block of stainless steel is in the order of +/- 30°C, thus negligible compared to the 900°C operating  temperature.

Conclusion
The system described in this article could explain an apparent over-unity COP or the ability to continue to supply overheated steam at the output even though the input power supply is switched off (self-sustaining mode), without requiring anomalous internal exothermic reactions.

P.S. Thanks for flagging typos.
Pubblicato in E-Cat | Contrassegnato | Lascia un commento

Come è possibile spiegare il COP apparente>1 o “l’autosostentamento” dell’E-Cat

Stesura del Report in data: 13/06/2016
Revisione 1 in data: 25/06/2016

Premessa
In questo articolo si descrive un sistema che può fornire una possibile spiegazione convenzionale (non l’unica) del fenomeno di “autosostentamento” descritto da alcuni osservatori in riferimento ai test effettuati sul generatore di vapore denominato E-Cat. Il sistema mostra come il generatore possa erogare vapore surriscaldato in modo “stranamente” stabile e come sia possibile che al momento dello spegnimento dell’alimentazione elettrica (inizio autosostentamento) la produzione non si arresti ed anzi, per un certo periodo, tenda ad aumentare la temperatura del vapore. Inoltre lo stesso sistema, senza alcuna modifica, può erogare contemporaneamente una piccola quantità di vapore mentre la quasi totalità dell’acqua in ingresso raggiunge l’uscita ancora in fase liquida, da cui la parvenza di un rapporto potenza uscente/potenza entrante (comunemente detto COP) pari a 7.

Principio di funzionamento
Il principio di funzionamento del sistema qui descritto è il seguente: la resistenza elettrica non scambia calore direttamente con l’acqua contenuta all’interno del generatore, ma scambia calore con una massa termica di notevoli dimensioni che a sua volta scambia calore con l’acqua attraverso uno strato isolante termico che permette di mantenere, una volta raggiunto l’equilibrio, la massa termica ad elevata temperatura, dell’ordine di 700-1000°C e la superficie esterna dello strato isolante a poco più di 100°C.

Descrizione
In Figura 1 è possibile vedere la sezione del generatore di vapore.

Figura 1

Figura 1

Le dimensioni del sistema non sono particolarmente critiche al fine del funzionamento. In Figura 1 sono indicati i seguenti elementi:

  1. Contenitore esterno (AISI304)
  2. tubo ingresso acqua
  3. tubo uscita vapore
  4. massa termica (AISI304)
  5. resistenze elettriche (n° 4 da 450W)
  6. isolante termico (lana di caolino)
  7. contenitore massa termica (AISI304)
  8. cavi alimentazione resistenze
  9. radiatore in alluminio
  10. termocoppia

Si è considerato che il sistema sia a sezione quadrata. In tal caso, con le dimensioni indicate in figura il sistema contiene circa 8 litri di acqua se riempito fino al livello indicato, circa 14 litri se riempito completamente. La massa termica, di dimensioni [200]x[200]x[20] mm ha una massa di circa 6.5 kg.

Dimensionamento
Il sistema alimentato ad esempio con una potenza elettrica di 1800W, una volta a regime, produce quindi, in assenza di fenomeni anomali, circa 3 kg/h di vapore. Per avere un riferimento di seguito è riportato un brevissimo filmato che mostra un getto di vapore leggermente surriscaldato di 7 kg/h:

Al momento dello spegnimento della resistenza il calore accumulato nella massa termica mantiene l’erogazione pressochè costante per un breve periodo, poi la massa comincerà a raffreddarsi (continua a cedere circa 1800W senza ricevere la stessa quantità di energia da parte delle resistenze elettriche).
Il transitorio del sistema nella fase di spegnimento è descritto dal bilancio dell’energia della massa termica:

ove m rappresenta la massa termica, cp il suo calore specifico, h il coefficiente di scambio, A la superficie di scambio.
La soluzione è:

Possiamo quindi assimilare il fenomeno del transitorio ad un circuito elettrico RC dove:

  • la capacità termica sarà l’equivalente del condensatore
  • la resistenza termica della resistenza elettrica
  • il calore della carica elettrica
  • la temperatura della differenza di potenziale

Se si suppone che il livello dell’acqua all’interno del generatore di vapore sia mantenuto costante e che la conducibilità termica dell’isolante frapposto tra massa termica e scatola immersa nell’acqua non dipenda dalla temperatura, si può asserire che il valore di R è costante.
Consideriamo la massa termica costituita da un blocco di acciaio inox del peso di 6.5 kg e:

  • che la sua temperatura all’inizio dell’autosostentamento sia di 900°C
  • che il vapore in uscita all’inizio dell’autosostentamento asporti dal sistema 1800W, pari a 1550 kcal/h (cioè che il sistema sia all’equilibrio)

La capacità termica della massa di acciaio vale:

C = 0.12 * 6.5 = 0.78 kcal/°C

essendo 0.12 Kcal/kg °C il calore specifico dell’acciaio inox.
Per similitudine col circuito elettrico la massa termica ridurrà la propria temperatura seguendo la nota legge:

T(t) = TL + ΔT0 * e-(t/RC)

ove R sta a indicare la resistenza termica tra la massa e l’acqua in ebollizione e C la capacità termica della massa (0.78 kcal/°C = 3260 J/°C). TL rappresenta la temperatura a cui il sistema tende per t tendente all’infinito, nel nostro caso 100°C.
La resistenza termica sarà pari a:

R = (900-100)/1550 = 0.51 h°C/kcal

La temperatura della massa termica in funzione del tempo dall’inizio dell’autosostentamento varrà quindi:

T(t) = 100 + 800 * e-[t / (0.51 x 0.78)]

e dopo 30 minuti (cioè 0.5 ore) varrà:

T(t) = 100 + 800 * e -(0.5 / 0.40) = 330°C

La quantità di vapore prodotta dopo 30 minuti sarà:

Q = Q(0) * (330 – 100) / (900-100) = 0.28 * Q(0)

cioè sarà ancora surriscaldato ma si sarà ridotto a poco più di un quarto di quello iniziale, una quantità comunque non trascurabile.
Dal valore della resistenza termica calcolato sopra possiamo dedurre (approssimativamente) lo spessore di isolante termico necessario tra la massa e la scatola che lo contiene, considerando che la resistenza termica tra superficie esterna della scatola e acqua è, in confronto, trascurabile.
Considerando una superficie di 0.12 m2 e di utilizzare lana di caolino pressata (λ = 0.1 W/m°C, valore medio tra 100 e 900°C) si ha:

s = λ * S * ΔT / P = 0.1 * 0.12 * 800 / 1800 = 0.0053m = 5.3mm

ove s = spessore; P = potenza; λ = conducibilità termica; S = superficie; ΔT = differenza di temperatura

Temperatura scatola contenente la massa termica
Mentre la massa termica si trova a elevata temperatura, la superficie della scatola che lo contiene (indicata con 7 in Figura 1) si trova a una temperatura molto più bassa grazie all’isolante termico che li separa (indicato con 6 in Figura 1) e al buon coefficiente di scambio esterno con l’acqua.
Occorre distinguere tra superfici immerse nell’acqua e coperchio superiore a stretto contatto termico con il radiatore di alluminio.
Se per adesso consideriamo il livello dell’acqua tale da non coprire il radiatore in alluminio, possiamo stimare la temperatura delle pareti immerse in acqua, senza addentrarci in complessi calcoli di scambio convettivo con fluido in cambiamento di stato, considerando il seguente diagramma tratto dal testo: F.Kreith – Principi di trasmissione del calore – Liguori

Figura 2

Figura 2

La superficie del fondo della scatola e quella laterale sono pari a circa i 2/3 della superficie totale. Dal momento che il flusso termico trasversale sulle pareti è ridottissimo, si può dire che circa i 2/3 del calore entrante (pari a 1200W) vengono ceduti all’acqua da questa superficie che risulta essere pari a circa 0.08 m2. Il flusso termico su tale superficie sarà quindi pari a circa 15000 W/m2 cioè circa 13000 kcal/hm2 .

Dal diagramma sopra riportato si vede come ci si trovi in zona puramente convettiva o al massimo all’inizio della zona di ebollizione a nuclei. In ogni caso la differenza di temperatura tra l’acqua (100°C) e la parete è estremamente bassa, certamente minore di 5°C.

Diverso è il caso della faccia superiore della scatola, a stretto contatto con un radiatore in alluminio. Se questo radiatore scambiasse calore solo con il vapore, cioè non fosse lambito dall’acqua, esso dovrebbe scambiare con esso i 600W rimanenti. Dal momento che la produzione di vapore in questa ipotesi sarebbe di circa 2 kg/h, anche supponendo la superficie dello scambiatore infinita, la sua temperatura (e quella del vapore surriscaldato) sarebbe:

T = 100 + 600 * 0.86 / (2 * 0.46) = 660 °C

essendo circa 0.46 kcal/kg°C il calore specifico del vapore nelle condizioni in esame.

Quindi per mantenere la temperatura dello scambiatore in alluminio a un valore accettabile è necessario che esso scambi parte del calore anche con l’acqua. Il livello dell’acqua dovrà quindi essere tale da lambire lo scambiatore di alluminio. In questo modo la sua temperatura potrà essere mantenuta a un valore (tipicamente 110-115°C) in grado di surriscaldare il vapore alla temperatura voluta. Come verrà spiegato ai punti successivi è possibile controllare contemporaneamente la temperatura di surriscaldamento del vapore e il livello dell’acqua mediante un comune termoregolatore.

Temperatura del vapore in uscita
Una questione di cui si è a lungo dibattuto è quella della temperatura del vapore in uscita, diversi osservatori affermano che essa era superiore a 100°C. Poiché si asserisce che tali temperature erano a pressione ambiente si deve concludere che si trattasse di vapore surriscaldato. In passato questo elemento era stato messo in dubbio sulla base del fatto che un generatore di vapore surriscaldato risulterebbe estremamente instabile: una variazione anche piccola della portata della pompa dell’acqua o dell’energia introdotta (o prodotta da una reazione interna) secondo taluni avrebbe variato grandemente la temperatura del vapore in uscita, che invece è sempre risultata stabile.

Il sistema descritto permette di avere nella parte superiore del generatore vapore surriscaldato rendendo inoltre la sua temperatura molto stabile.

Per ottenere questo la parte superiore del gruppo di riscaldamento è dotato di radiatore alettato (indicato con 9 in Figura 1) posizionato al di sopra del pelo dell’acqua. Si è supposto trattarsi di un radiatore in alluminio Elbomec S-220.

Il vapore che si libera dal pelo dell’acqua nell’incontrare il radiatore eleva la sua temperatura surriscaldandosi, fino a una temperatura dipendente dalla portata del vapore e dalla superficie del radiatore, ma che, grazie alla elevata superficie alettata in rapporto alla quantità di vapore prodotto, non sarà lontana dalla temperatura di questo.

Quando le resistenze elettriche vengono arrestate per iniziare una fase di autosostentamento (mantenendo la pompa dell’acqua in funzione) ci si aspetta che lentamente la temperatura del vapore in uscita cominci a diminuire. In realtà, se il livello dell’acqua è controllato mediante un termostato, la temperatura del vapore rimarrà costante per un periodo prolungato, come visto a proposito del “Dimensionamento“, e ciò che diminuirà nel tempo sarà solo la quantità di vapore prodotto. In realtà sarebbe sufficiente un aumento (manuale o automatico) del set point al momento dell’inizio dell’autosostentamento per vedere la temperatura del vapore addirittura aumentare.

Controllo del livello
Il livello dell’acqua all’interno è fondamentale per un corretto funzionamento durante la fase di “autosostentamento”. Un livello troppo basso può portare a temperatura eccessiva del radiatore alettato. Al contrario un livello troppo alto porterebbe all’eccessivo raffreddamento del radiatore e conseguentemente ad abbassamento della temperatura del vapore in uscita che non sarebbe più surriscaldato.

Come già anticipato, il livello potrebbe essere controllato mediante sensore di livello, ma in realtà il semplice avviamento/arresto della pompa ad un determinato set-point di temperatura del vapore in uscita (tipicamente 110°C) appare essere un metodo semplice e perfettamente utilizzabile. In questo caso, per evitare rischiosi surriscaldamenti, è opportuno, prima di iniziare il riscaldamento, immettere acqua nel generatore almeno fino a lambire la parte inferiore del contenitore della massa termica.

Poichè potrebbe sorgere il dubbio che tale regolazione possa risultare instabile e di difficile attuazione, possiamo stimare i tempi di reazione richiesti al sistema di controllo per mantenere stabili sia il livello che la temperatura.

Se supponiamo che il livello dell’acqua sia sceso fino a non lambire più il radiatore di alluminio, questo comincerà ad aumentare la propria temperatura dal momento che riceve ancora una potenza di circa 600W attraverso lo strato isolante che lo separa dalla massa termica, ma continua a scambiare una potenza molto piccola col vapore (circa 30W se si suppone che la temperatura del vapore in uscita sia di 110°C). Dal momento che la massa di tale radiatore è pari a circa 3 Kg e che il calore specifico dell’alluminio è pari a 0.24 Kcal/kg°C, la velocità di salita della temperatura del radiatore sarà circa:

ΔT / t = 600 * 0.86 / 3 * 0.24 = 716 °C/h = 0.2 °C/s

cioè un sistema di controllo avente un tempo di reazione di ben 5 secondi porterebbe a fluttuazioni di temperatura dell’ordine di 1°C. In pratica sarà possibile utilizzare un normale termoregolatore con uscita ON/OFF che faccia partire e fermare la pompa ad una determinata temperatura del vapore in uscita (abbiamo supposto 110°C).

Tempo di messa a regime
Il tempo di messa a regime viene certamente allungato dalla presenza della massa termica. Occorre però considerare che contrariamente a quanto si potrebbe pensare probabilmente non tutta l’acqua all’interno del generatore è a 100°C per cui l’energia immessa nella massa termica è in parte compensata dal fatto che solo una parte dell’acqua è riscaldata.

Infatti il riscaldamento avviene nella parte superiore del generatore, contrariamente a quanto avviene in una comune pentola che è riscaldata dal basso. Nella pentola l’acqua presenta una temperatura quasi uniforme a causa dei moti convettivi. In questo caso invece i movimenti convettivi sono assenti e l’unica agitazione presente è quella causata dalle piccole bolle di vapore che si sprigionano sulla superficie esterna del contenitore della massa termica. Dal momento che come si deduce dalla Figura 2 l’ebollizione nella massa liquida è praticamente assente e il vapore si libera principalmente in superficie, è plausibile che lo strato più basso di acqua presente all’interno del generatore rimanga a una temperatura non molto superiore a quella di ingresso (vedere nota tecnica).

Il tempo di messa a regime può quindi essere calcolato considerando la somma dell’energia necessaria per portare la massa termica a una temperatura di circa 900°C e di quella necessaria a portare a 100°C solo una modesta quantità di acqua, che possiamo stimare in 4 litri.

Eseguiamo un calcolo approssimativo, dal momento che, trattandosi di un regime transitorio il calcolo rigoroso è assai complesso:

  • Energia fornita alla massa termica = 6.5 * 900 * 0.12 = 700 kcal
  • Energia fornita all’acqua = 4 * 80 = 320 kcal
  • Energia totale fornita = 700 + 320 = 1020 kcal
  • Tempo per fornire tale energia = 1020/ (1800 * 0.86) = 0.65 h = 40 minuti

Considerando che nel frattempo energia viene asportata dal vapore che comincia a formarsi, si può affermare che il sistema si porta quasi a regime (in teoria per raggiungere il regime occorre un tempo infinito) in circa un’ora.

La produzione di vapore invece comincerà abbastanza prima, non appena la superficie esterna del contenitore della massa termica supera i 100°C.

Stabilità del sistema
Contrariamente a quanto potrebbe apparire è quindi possibile produrre vapore surriscaldato a temperatura molto stabile anche a fronte di variazioni di potenza fornita o di portata della pompa che immette acqua nel sistema.

Possiamo per esempio considerare una improvvisa riduzione di potenza (ma ovviamente vale anche per un aumento) del 10%: da 1800W a 1600W. La temperatura della massa termica diminuirà con una velocità iniziale data da:

dT/dt = ΔP / C = (1800 – 1600) / 3260 = 0.06 °C/s = 3.6 °C/minuto

Occorreranno quindi 15 minuti per avere una diminuzione di temperatura della massa termica di 50°C, valore trascurabile rispetto ai 900°C di partenza e che portano a una variazione della temperatura del vapore in uscita inferiore a 1°C.

Si può prendere in considerazione il caso di improvvisa mancanza di funzionamento della pompa. In questo caso la temperatura del radiatore in alluminio comincerebbe presto ad aumentare anche se le resistenze verrebbero spente dal controllo di temperatura. La temperatura dello scambiatore in alluminio, come abbiamo visto aumenterebbe al ritmo di circa 0.2°C/s e potrebbe diventare preoccupante (300°C) dopo circa 15 minuti. Poichè però nel frattempo anche la temperatura della massa termica sarebbe diminuita e considerando che l’asportazione di calore da parte del vapore (che sarebbe fortemente surriscaldato) diventerebbe importante, si può dire che il sistema si raffredderebbe senza che alcuna parte possa raggiungere temperature in grado di danneggiarlo.

Il controllo del sistema durante un test può quindi essere effettuato manualmente con tutta calma, senza necessità di anelli di retroazione.

Simulazione di COP = 7
Lo stesso sistema è in grado di simulare una potenza termica in uscita pari a circa 7 volte quella immessa (COP = 7).

Si consideri di avere il sistema come sopra all’equilibrio e che esso sia alimentato con acqua a 25°C. Dal sistema usciranno circa 3 kg/h di vapore leggermente surriscaldato.

Si consideri ora di incrementare la portata della pompa che introduce l’acqua di 6 volte cioè di portarla a 18 l/h.

Il calore necessario a portare l’acqua a 100°C, cioè all’ebollizione vale:

Q = 18 * (100 – 25) = 1350 kcal/h = 1570W

Poichè vengono forniti 1800W, si può affermare che l’acqua verrà effettivamente portata all’ebollizione e verrà anche prodotta una piccola quantità di vapore (0.4 kg/h in assenza di dissipazioni).

La differenza è che la quasi totalità dell’acqua introdotta non verrà vaporizzata e uscirà dal condotto di uscita (3 in Figura 1) alla temperatura di 100 °C.

In questo caso un termometro introdotto nella parte superiore del generatore di vapore misurerà una temperatura pari o leggermente superiore a 100°C dando l’impressione che si stia producendo vapore in grande quantità mentre in realtà dal sistema esce praticamente solo acqua a 100°C.

A fronte dei 1800W in ingresso si sarà quindi indotti a stimare una potenza termica in uscita pari a circa:

Q = 18 * (75 + 545) = 11160 kcal/h = 12970 W

pari appunto a un valore apparente di COP = 7.

Quando il sistema funziona in questo modo non serve alcun sistema di controllo della temperatura o del livello, essendo sufficiente imporre una portata della pompa di circa 18 l/h. Una eventuale piccola diminuzione della portata non avrà alcuna conseguenza, dato che il tutto continuerà a funzionare ma solo con un COP apparente leggermente più basso poiché verrà prodotto più vapore. Al contrario un aumento della portata della pompa superiore al 5% potrebbe portare a diminuzione della temperatura di uscita dell’acqua sotto i 100°C, una diminuzione che appare ad esempio nel Report che documenta il test del Gennaio 2011 (foto dello schermo del PC che raccoglieva i dati), come visibile in Figura 3.

Figura 3

Figura 3

Si noti inoltre come sarebbe sufficiente prolungare il condotto di uscita verso l’interno del generatore fino all’incirca al livello del pelo dell’acqua come indicato in Figura 4, per poter avere l’apparente produzione di vapore con COP = 7 e poter contemporaneamente misurare una temperatura nettamente superiore a 100°C.

Figura 4

Figura 4

Infatti in questo caso il radiatore in alluminio rimarrebbe in parte fuori dall’acqua come nel caso dell’autosostentamento e potrebbe quindi raggiungere una temperatura superiore a 100°C permettendo di surriscaldare il poco vapore prodotto.

Resistenze di riscaldamento
L’unico componente commerciale critico del sistema è la resistenza di riscaldamento. Essa infatti deve lavorare a temperature molto elevate ed è quindi a forte rischio di rottura per surriscaldamento.

In Figura 1 sono state indicate resistenze a cartuccia adatte a questo utilizzo. Le resistenze più comuni sono in grado di operare con temperatura superficiale fino a 750°C con densità di potenza superficiale di 50W/cm2, ma esistono in commercio modelli in grado di operare in modo continuativo oltre 1000°C. (esempio cartucce in nitruro di boro della TRE C di Segrate (MI), disponibili nei diametri standard 12.5, 14 e 16mm).

Nel disegno sono state indicate 4 resistenze di diametro 12.5mm, lunghe 200mm, ognuna della potenza di 450W. La densità di potenza superficiale è quindi minore di 6 W/cm2 cioè quasi 10 volte inferiore alla massima ammissibile. Questo sovradimensionamento consente di poter operare con resistenze isolate in nitruro di boro a temperature superficiali estremamente elevate, anche notevolmente superiori a 1000°C e garantisce che la temperatura di ogni punto del blocco di acciaio inox sia praticamente identica a quella superficiale delle resistenze. Infatti considerando le dimensioni indicate in Figura 1 e che la conducibilità termica dell’acciaio inox è circa 17 W/m°C, la massima differenza di temperatura tra i vari punti del blocco di acciaio inox è dell’ordine di +/- 30°C, del tutto trascurabili rispetto ai 900°C di lavoro.

Conclusione
Il sistema descritto in questo Post potrebbe spiegare un COP apparente>1 o la capacità di continuare a erogare potenza (vapore) anche nel caso di alimentazione elettrica scollegata (autosostentamento), senza che per questo sia dimostrata una produzione “anomala” di calore o “eccesso di energia”.

Pubblicato in E-Cat | Lascia un commento

How to overestimate water flux by wrongly positioning an instrument

Report written on: 19/04/2016

This Post was triggered by a discussion concerning the energy measurements published in this document of May 2013 (Provisional Patent Application US61/821,914) and by the statements of a user on the 22passi Blog (nickname: Hermano Tobia), who does not believe that a possibility exists for outrageous errors in measuring the quantity of water drained from a container named “water reservoir” when this is done by using a “Flowmeter” as the one mentioned in the said document. In particular Hermano Tobia, referring to an image that likely documented visually the setup adopted (image referred to as Figure 1), stated (translating from Italian):

The pipe with the flow meter is connected to the Tellarini self-priming pump that is in the blue bucket where the condensed vapor is conveyed, thus I don’t believe your hypothesis is plausible.[10 April 2016 23:03]

Hermano Tobia referred to the technical criticism previously expressed by Mario Massa, who had highlighted how the improper choice made for positioning the “Flowmeter” was such to potentially cause a malfunction of the instrument. In particular Mario Massa in his comment had evidenced that:

… that palette flowmeter is mounted in a manner that is absolutely incorrect: it is in the highest point of a pipe that flows into a reservoir.” [10 April 2016 20:22]

i.e. the “Flowmeter” (in particular a litre counter as normally used in households for drinkable water) was wrongly positioned if aimed at correctly recording the true flux of water.

Figure 1 shows the set-up adopted for that test and one can readily see how the “water reservoir” (the blue container) is positioned below the instrument.

Figure 1 – Reservoir equipped with a “Flowmeter” positioned on top of the pipe runs

Figure 1 – Reservoir equipped with a “Flowmeter” positioned on top of the pipe runs

To convince those who may doubt that significant functional issues may arise when the conditions are not met for a complete and constant filling of the pipe where water is present and flows, a test setup was realized (Figure 3) similar to the one in question. By using a pump, water is drawn from a reservoir, and the quantity of water is measured by initially using a Watermeter by Gioanola (*) model DALF/25-1 (Figure 2):

Figure 2 – 1″ Watermeter by Gioanola

Figure 2 – 1″ Watermeter by Gioanola

In the first test the Watermeter size 1″ and the relevant connections are positioned in a similar fashion as visible in the image in question (Figure 1) i.e. in the functionally INCORRECT manner adopted for that test.  The overall set-up is visible in Figure 3:

FFigure 3 – INCORRECT 1” Watermeter Set-up

Figure 3 – INCORRECT 1” Watermeter Set-up

 

With such setup we will determine the actual quantity of water flowing per unit time and compare to a reference measurement.

The verification of the clumsily installed instrument’s reading  is done by filling a glass container of known volume (1 Liter in our case) with water drawn by the reservoir, and by measuring the time needed to fill the reference 1 Liter container. The value recorded with this method is then compared to the instrument’s reading.

In order to document the main phases of the test a brief Video (n.1) was taken.

Summarizing the main data of our first test, water starts to flow into the 1 Liter container  at minute 0:26 of the video, and the container is filled completely at minute 1:13. During this interval the roller counter that indicates the quantity of water flowed has completed 3 turns, that correspond to 3 Liters of water estimated by the instrument.

By analyzing the data one can compute the time necessary to pump 1 Liter of water into the glass container. Such time is 47 seconds, thus the water flux is estimated about 76.6 liters/hour.

If one were to trust the reading of the Watermeter, measuring 3 liters, and considering the same 47 seconds, one would erroneously estimate a water flux of about 229.8 liters/hour thus with a 200% measurement error.

In the second test the set-up with the 1” Watermeter as modified in order to ensure a CORRECT instrument functionality, by introducing an upward bend downstream from the Watermeter  The overall setup realized is visible in Figure 4:

Figure 4 – CORRECT 1” Watermeter Set-up

Figure 4 – CORRECT 1” Watermeter Set-up

In order to document the main phases of the test, a brief Video (n.2) was taken.

Summarizing the main data of our second test, water starts to flow into the 1 Liter container  at minute 0:23 of the video, and the container is filled completely at minute 1:11. During this interval the roller counter that indicates the quantity of water flowed has completed 1.1 turns, that correspond to 1.1 Liters of water estimated by the instrument, with an error within 10% roughly.

By analyzing the data one can compute the time necessary to pump 1 Liter of water into the glass container. Such time is 48 seconds, thus the water flux is estimated about 75 liters/hour.

For the third test  a 3/4″ Gioanola Watermeter model USLF/20 (Figure 5 and Figure 6) was used:

Figure 5 – 3/4″ Gioanola Watermeter

Figure 5 – 3/4″ Gioanola Watermeter

Figure 6 –3/4″ Gioanola Watermeter

Figure 6 –3/4″ Gioanola Watermeter

In this case, again the Watermeter size 3/4″ and the relevant connections are positioned in a similar fashion as visible in the image in question (Figure 1) i.e. in the functionally INCORRECT manner adopted for that test.  The overall set-up is visible in Figure 7:

Figure 7 – INCORRECT 3/4″ Watermeter Set-up

Figure 7 – INCORRECT 3/4″ Watermeter Set-up

Again the verification of the clumsily installed instrument’s reading  is done by filling a glass container of known volume (1 Liter in our case) with water drawn by the reservoir, and by measuring the time needed to fill the reference 1 Liter container. The value recorded with this method is then compared to the instrument’s reading.

In order to document the main phases of the test a brief Video (n.3) was taken.

Summarizing the main data of our third test, water starts to flow into the 1 Liter container  at minute 0:30 of the video, and the container is filled completely at minute 1:26. During this interval the roller counter that indicates the quantity of water flowed has completed 2.7 turns, that correspond to 2.7 Liters of water estimated by the instrument.

By analyzing the data one can compute the time necessary to pump 1 Liter of water into the glass container. Such time is 56 seconds, thus the water flux is estimated about 64.3 liters/hour.

If one were to trust the reading of the Watermeter, measuring 2.7 litri, and considering the same 56 seconds, one would erroneously estimate a water flux of about 176.8 liters/hour thus with a 175% measurement error.

In the fourth test the set-up with the 3/4” Watermeter was modified in order to ensure a CORRECT instrument functionality, by introducing an upward bend downstream from the Watermeter. The overall setup realized is visible in Figure 8:

Figure 8 – CORRECT 3/4″ Watermeter Set-up

Figure 8 – CORRECT 3/4″ Watermeter Set-up

In order to document the main phases of the test, a brief Video (n.4) was taken.

Summarizing the main data of our fourth test, water starts to flow into the 1 Liter container  at minute 0:31 of the video, and the container is filled completely at minute 1:28. During this interval the roller counter that indicates the quantity of water flowed has completed 1.0 turns, that correspond to 1.0 Liters of water estimated by the instrument, with negligible error.

By analyzing the data one can compute the time necessary to pump 1 Liter of water into the glass container. Such time is 57 seconds, thus the water flux is estimated about 63.1  liters/hour.

Conclusions

The data shown help in understanding how large an overestimate can be caused by an incorrect instrument placement when measuring water flow.

Such behavior of “palette” counters is well known to specialists in the field, chosing to install the instrument in that way the risk to overestimate is high and the measurement could become completely unreliable.

(*) It is worth  noting that in order to avoid malfunctions, Gioanola published a  series of installation instructions (to which installers must comply) in order to ensure the necessary conditions for the correct functionality of their Products.

Pubblicato in E-Cat | Contrassegnato | 1 commento

Come sovrastimare il flusso d’acqua posizionando uno strumento nel modo sbagliato

Stesura del Report in data: 17/04/2016

Questo Post prende spunto da una discussione in merito alle misure energetiche pubblicate in questo documento del Maggio 2013 (Provisional Patent Application US61/821,914) e da quanto sostenuto da un utente del Blog 22passi (nickname: Hermano Tobia), utente che in sostanza afferma di non credere affatto alla possibilità di errori pacchiani nella misura dell’acqua prelevata dal contenitore denominato “water reservoir” quando la si effettui utilizzando un “Flowmeter” come quello citato in detto documento. In particolare Hermano Tobia, facendo riferimento ad una immagine che molto probabilmente documentava visivamente il set-up adottato (immagine di seguito indicata come Figura 1), affermava:

Il tubo col flussimetro é collegato alla pompa autoadescante tellarini che é nel secchio blu dove é convogliata la condensa, e quindi non credo che la tua ipotesi sia plausibile.[10 aprile 2016 23:03]

Hermano Tobia si riferiva alla critica tecnica espressa in precedenza da Mario Massa, il quale aveva sottolineato come la scelta infelice adottata per il posizionamento del “Flowmeter” era tale da comportare potenzialmente un cattivo funzionamento dello strumento stesso. In particolare Mario Massa nel suo commento aveva fatto notare che:

… quel flussimetro a palette è montato in modo assolutamente non corretto: è nel punto più alto di un tubo che sfocia in un serbatoio.[10 aprile 2016 20:22]

cioè il “Flowmeter” (in particolare un Contalitri del tipo utilizzato normalmente nelle abitazioni per l’acqua potabile) era stato collocato in maniera errata se lo scopo era quello di rilevare correttamente il reale flusso di acqua transitante.

La Figura 1 mostra il set-up adottato per quel test e si può notare come il “water reservoir” (il contenitore blu) sia posizionato in basso rispetto allo strumento.

Figura 1 - Serbatoio munito di "Flussimetro" posizionato in alto

Figura 1 – Serbatoio munito di “Flussimetro” posizionato in alto

Per convincere chi eventualmente avesse dubbi sui notevoli problemi funzionali che possono manifestarsi quando non si determinino le condizioni per avere un completo e costante riempimento della condotta all’interno della quale è presente e fluisce l’acqua, è stato realizzato un nostro set-up di prova (Figura 3) analogo a quello in discussione. Utilizzando una pompa si andrà a prelevare acqua da un serbatoio, la quantità di acqua prelevata verrà misurata facendo uso inizialmente di un Watermeter della Gioanola (*) modello DALF/25-1 (Figura 2):

Figura 2 - Watermeter Gioanola da 1"

Figura 2 – Watermeter Gioanola da 1″

Nel primo test il Watermeter da 1″ e le relative connessioni sono state posizionate similmente a quanto visibile nell’immagine in questione (la Figura 1) cioè nel modo funzionalmente SCORRETTO adottato per quel test ed il set-up complessivo realizzato è appunto visibile in Figura 3:

Figura 3 - Watermeter da 1" posizionato SCORRETTAMENTE

Figura 3 – Watermeter da 1″ Set-up SCORRETTO

 

Si andrà quindi a determinare la quantità effettiva d’acqua transitante nell’unità di tempo per confronto con una misura di riferimento.

La verifica della correttezza dell’indicazione dello strumento,  installato così “maldestramente”, si effettua riempendo un contenitore di vetro di volume noto (nel nostro caso pari ad 1 Litro) con l’acqua prelevata dal serbatoio, e misurando il tempo necessario al riempimento del contenitore di riferimento da 1 Litro. Si confronta poi il valore rilevato con questo metodo con quanto indicato dello strumento.

Per documentare le principali fasi del test è stato realizzato un breve Filmato (n.1).

Riassumendo i dati salienti del nostro primo test, l’inizio dell’immissione dell’acqua all’interno del contenitore da 1 Litro parte circa al minuto 0:26 del filmato, mentre il riempimento si completa al minuto 1:13. In questo lasso di tempo la rotellina, che indica la quantità d’acqua transitante, ha completato 3 giri che corrispondono a 3 litri d’acqua stimati dallo strumento.

Analizzando i dati è possibile calcolare il tempo effettivo necessario per immettere 1 Litro d’acqua nel contenitore di vetro. Tale tempo risulta pari a 47 secondi, da cui il flusso d’acqua reale si stima corrisponda a circa 76.6 litri/ora.

Se invece considerassimo le indicazioni dirette del Watermeter, che indica 3 litri, considerando i 47 secondi si stimerebbe in modo errato un flusso d’acqua pari a circa 229.8 litri/ora quindi un errore pari al 200%.

Nel secondo test il set-up con il Watermeter da 1″ è stato modificato al fine di assicurare il CORRETTO funzionamento dello strumento, introducendo una curva verso l’alto “a valle” del Watermeter ed il set-up complessivo realizzato è appunto quello visibile in Figura 4:

Figura 4 - Watermeter da 1" posizionato CORRETTAMENTE

Figura 4 – Watermeter da 1″ Set-up CORRETTO

Per documentare le principali fasi del test è stato realizzato un breve Filmato (n.2).

Riassumendo i dati salienti del nostro secondo test, l’inizio dell’immissione dell’acqua all’interno del contenitore da 1 Litro parte circa al minuto 0:23 del filmato, mentre il riempimento si completa al minuto 1:11. In questo lasso di tempo la rotellina, che indica la quantità d’acqua transitante, ha completato 1.1 giri che corrispondono a 1.1 litri d’acqua stimati dallo strumento con un errore contenuto al 10% circa.

Analizzando i dati è possibile verificare il tempo effettivo necessario per immettere 1 Litro d’acqua nel contenitore di vetro. Tale tempo risulta pari a 48 secondi, da cui il flusso d’acqua reale corrisponde ancora a circa 75 litri/ora.

Per il terzo test si è utilizzato un Watermeter Gioanola da 3/4″ modello USLF/20 (Figura 5 e Figura 6):

Figura 5 - Watermeter Gioanola da 3/4"

Figura 5 – Watermeter Gioanola da 3/4″

Figura 6 - Watermeter Gioanola da 3/4"

Figura 6 – Watermeter Gioanola da 3/4″

Anche in questo caso inizialmente il Watermeter da 3/4″ e le relative connessioni sono state posizionate similmente a quanto visibile nell’immagine in questione (la Figura 1) cioè nel modo funzionalmente SCORRETTO adottato per quel test ed il set-up complessivo realizzato è appunto visibile in Figura 7:

Figura 7 – Watermeter da 3/4″ Set-up SCORRETTO

Figura 7 – Watermeter da 3/4″ Set-up SCORRETTO

Nuovamente la verifica della correttezza dell’indicazione dello strumento,  installato così “maldestramente”, si effettua riempendo un contenitore di vetro di volume noto (nel nostro caso pari ad 1 Litro) con l’acqua prelevata dal serbatoio, e misurando il tempo necessario al riempimento del contenitore di riferimento da 1 Litro. Si confronta poi il valore rilevato con questo metodo con quanto indicato dello strumento.

Per documentare le principali fasi del test è stato realizzato un breve Filmato (n.3).

Riassumendo i dati salienti del nostro terzo test, l’inizio dell’immissione dell’acqua all’interno del contenitore da 1 Litro parte circa al minuto 0:30 del filmato, mentre il riempimento si completa al minuto 1:26. In questo lasso di tempo la rotellina, che indica la quantità d’acqua transitante, ha completato 2.7 giri che corrispondono a 2.7 litri d’acqua stimati dallo strumento.

Analizzando i dati è possibile calcolare il tempo effettivo necessario per immettere 1 Litro d’acqua nel contenitore di vetro. Tale tempo risulta pari a 56 secondi, da cui il flusso d’acqua reale si stima corrisponda a circa 64.3 litri/ora.

Se invece considerassimo le indicazioni dirette del Watermeter, che indica 2.7 litri, considerando i 56 secondi si stimerebbe in modo errato un flusso d’acqua pari a circa 176.8 litri/ora quindi un errore pari al 175%.

Nel quarto test il set-up con il Watermeter da 3/4″ è stato modificato al fine di assicurare il CORRETTO funzionamento dello strumento, introducendo una curva verso l’alto “a valle” del Watermeter ed il set-up complessivo realizzato è appunto quello visibile in Figura 8:

Figura 8 – Watermeter da 3/4″ Set-up CORRETTO

Figura 8 – Watermeter da 3/4″ Set-up CORRETTO

Per documentare le principali fasi del test è stato realizzato un breve Filmato (n.4).

Riassumendo i dati salienti del nostro quarto test, l’inizio dell’immissione dell’acqua all’interno del contenitore da 1 Litro parte circa al minuto 0:31 del filmato, mentre il riempimento si completa al minuto 1:28. In questo lasso di tempo la rotellina, che indica la quantità d’acqua transitante, ha completato 1.0 giri che corrispondono a 1.0 litri d’acqua stimati dallo strumento, praticamente un errore nullo.

Analizzando i dati è possibile verificare il tempo effettivo necessario per immettere 1 Litro d’acqua nel contenitore di vetro. Tale tempo risulta pari a 57 secondi, da cui il flusso d’acqua reale corrisponde a circa 63.1 litri/ora.

Conclusioni

Quanto mostrato rende l’idea dell’enorme sovrastima, rispetto al reale flusso d’acqua, che uno scorretto utilizzo dello strumento può determinare.

Tale comportamento degli strumenti “a palette” è noto ai tecnici del settore ed appare realmente incomprensibile il motivo per il quale gli esecutori del test preso in esame abbiano installato lo strumento nelle condizioni operative in cui appunto il rischio di sovrastima risulta così elevato da rendere del tutto inattendibile la misurazione.

(*) Si noti che proprio allo scopo di evitare malfunzionamenti la Gioanola ha pubblicato una serie di istruzioni installative (a cui gli installatori devono attenersi) al fine di assicurare le condizioni necessarie per il corretto funzionamento dei propri prodotti.

Appendice 1 al Post [21/04/2016]

Hermano Tobia ha contestato il setup realizzato dal GSVIT in quanto a suo parere privo del pezzo di tubo, rivolto verso il basso, che dalla Figura 1 parrebbe immerso nel serbatoio. Tobia rivendica che questo “accorgimento” (del quale afferma che il GSVIT non si sarebbe accorto) garantendo una sorta di “circuito chiuso”, renderebbe la misura dello strumento immune da rischi di sovrastima perchè l’aria non potrebbe più entrare dallo scarico.

Sulla base di semplici considerazioni fisiche GSVIT invece ha ritenuto che questa parte di condotta a “tubo immerso” non determina effetto nell’impedire la sovrastima da parte dello strumento e per questo motivo il tubo immerso non è stato preso in considerazione dal GSVIT per la realizzazione dei precedenti set-up dimostrativi.

GSVIT invece aveva suggerito e mostrato l’efficacia del montaggio CORRETTO che prevede l’introduzione di una curva verso l’alto (per poi ritornare verso il basso), collocata “a valle” del Watermeter.

Ad ogni buon conto, con l’unico scopo di dare una evidenza più che altro a carattere didattico di quanto contestato, si è variato il set-up modificandolo come visibile in Figura 9, aggiungendo anche la parte terminale immersa in un contenitore pieno d’acqua.

Figura 9 - Setup con uscita immersa

Figura 9 – Setup con uscita immersa

Si è ripetuto il confronto tra il reale valore di acqua transitata in un determinato intervallo di tempo e quella “misurata” dallo strumento. Il valore reale, questa volta, è stato determinato con il metodo del peso della massa dell’acqua, utilizzando una bilancia.

Nel Filmato (n.5) è stato documentato lo svolgimento del test.

Riassumendo i dati salienti di questo ulteriore test, ricavabili dal filmato:

a) peso iniziale 550 grammi circa al minuto 0:29 del filmato

b) rilevazione iniziale 0 Litri al minuto 0:31 del filmato

c) peso finale 1650 grammi circa al minuto 1:31 del fimato

d) rilevazione finale 2.3 Litri al minuto 1:31 del filmato

da cui analizzando questi dati è possibile determinare:

c)a) = 1650 – 550 = 1100 grammi in 62 secondi

d)b) = 2.3 – 0 = 2.3 litri in 60 secondi

cioè il reale flusso d’acqua vale circa 64 l/h mentre quello misurato dallo strumento risulta in elevato sovraeccesso e pari a circa 138 l/h.

Si conferma pertanto quanto già noto dalla teoria e cioè che la parte di tubo immerso di per sè non da alcuna particolare garanzia che lo strumento lavori in condizioni tali da stimare correttamente la quantità d’acqua transitata.

Appendice 2 al Post [23/04/2016]

Hermano Tobia ha correttamente messo in dubbio che la sovrastima dello strumento possa esistere anche quando il flusso d’acqua in transito nella condotta sia molto maggiore di quelli mostrati sin’ora. Infatti se la portata è sufficientemente elevata l’acqua è in grado di espellere l’aria dallo strumento anche se esso è montato nel punto più alto della tubazione.
La portata ridotta è stata utilizzata dal GSVIT sulla base della considerazione che il documento nei calcoli del COP fa riferimento all’utilizzo di soli 18 generatori ognuno con una potenza termica supposta di circa 11kW e alimentati da due circuiti ognuno con la propria pompa e Flussimetro (vedi Figura 1 del documento).
In queste condizioni la portata di acqua letta su ogni Flussimetro (supposta uguale e costante) doveva essere di circa 170 l/h in linea con i valori utilizzati nei nostri test.
Ovviamente è possibile che le pompe non fossero state utilizzate a portata ridotta (la portata delle pompe centrifughe normalmente viene ridotta semplicemente mediante valvola di strozzaggio in uscita come effettivamente ha fatto GSVIT). In questo caso, dal momento che la portata nominale delle pompe era certamente molto superiore a quella necessaria per i moduli a prescindere dal loro numero utilizzato, occorre supporre che esse venissero accese ogni volta che il livello nel serbatoio di raccolta (water reservoir nel documento) raggiungeva un certo livello e spente prima che le pompe pescassero aria.

Hermano Tobia aveva fatto notare che la pompa utilizzata dal GSVIT (centrifuga a immersione) era diversa da quella indicata nel documento (autoadescante).
La scelta della pompa a immersione è stata una scelta voluta da parte del GSVIT perchè essa garantisce che non possa essere aspirata aria che altererebbe il funzionamento del Flussimetro.
Prendendo in considerazione queste osservazioni è stato allestito un nuovo test che prevedeva l’utilizzo di una pompa autoadescante e una portata misurata dal Flussimetro di circa 1400 litri/ora.
Se tutto fosse stato montato correttamente avremmo constatato che la misura indicata dal Flussimetro coincideva con la quantità di acqua effettivamente transitata. Abbiamo però voluto verificare come con questo set-up sia sufficiente un piccolo ingresso di aria per alterare completamente la misura del Flussimetro indipendentemente dalla sua posizione e dalla portata utilizzata.

Bisogna infatti considerare che le pompe autoadescanti contrariamente alle comuni centrifughe, hanno la capacità di adescarsi e funzionare anche se oltre all’acqua viene aspirata una quantità anche importante di aria.

Il set-up realizzato e il modello di pompa (Water Pump Conforto modello MPM 2 CRA di tipo autoadescante, di potenza 0.55 kW) sono visibili nelle Figure 10 e 11:

Figura 10 - Setup a flusso elevato con pompa autoadescante

Figura 10 – Setup a flusso elevato con pompa autoadescante

Figura 11- Water Pump Conforto

Figura 11- Water Pump Conforto

Nel test la sovrastima del Watermeter risiede nella miscela di acqua e aria che si forma nel tubo di aspirazione. L’ingresso anomalo di aria è stato ottenuto semplicemente omettendo il teflon di tenuta sulle giunzioni del tubo di aspirazione. Inutile dire che un errore anche molto maggiore si ottiene se si omette di arrestare la pompa una volta vuoto il “water reservoir” lasciando che la pompa aspiri acqua e aria.

Nel Filmato (n.6) è stato documentato lo svolgimento del test.

Anche questa volta il confronto avviene tra il reale valore di acqua transitata in un determinato intervallo di tempo e quella “misurata” dallo strumento nel medesimo intervallo. Il valore reale è stato determinato con il metodo del peso della massa dell’acqua, utilizzando una bilancia.

Riassumendo i dati salienti di questo ulteriore test, ricavabili dal filmato, si può verificare che a fronte di 5 Litri indicati dallo strumento in realtà l’acqua effettivamente transitata risulta poco più di 3.1 Litri.

Pubblicato in E-Cat | Lascia un commento

TPR2 – Calorimetry of Hot-Cat performed by means of IR camera

First issue: 08/02/2015

Introduction
Some recent experimental measurements by the Martin Fleischmann Memorial Project (MFMP) highlighted a possible error in the Hot-Cat calorimetric measurement; the calorimetric measurement we are referring to is described in the document known as “TPR2” or Lugano Report. In particular, in the report of the MFMP experiment the following consideration is stated:

The main revelation was that the emissivity required for the camera to correctly interpret the temperatures on the surface was very close to 0.95. When we plugged in the emissivities cited from literature in the Lugano report (0.8 to 0.4), the apparent temperature was 1200° to 1500°C at 900W in.

GSVIT already long ago had suggested that the measures and the calorimetric analysis performed by the Lugano Report authors (in the following AA) (G.Levi, E.Foschi, B.Höistad, R.Pettersson, Lars Tegnér, H. Essén) contained a fundamental error since they considered the Alumina as a gray body, as far as thermal radiation is concerned.

The experimental measurements by MFMP were carried out on a replica device (a simulacrum of the real Hot-Cat), confirmed what was only a hypothesis by GSVIT and, where correct, they allow to affirm that the method adopted by the TPR2 AA to calculate the reactor surface temperature (and therefore the amount of heat irradiated) was incorrect.
In general, it is difficult to define the error generated from a wrong method set-up on the outside temperature and radiated power measurements, since it is not sufficient that the simulacrum be identical in shape, dimensions and materials. Actually, Alumina can assume 7 polymorphic forms with different crystalline structure and industrially the word “pure Alumina” starts to be used for 99% purity. We want to recall here the results of the analysis of samples of the Hot-Cat Alumina as reported in TPR2:

The results confirmed that it was indeed alumina, with a purity of at least 99%. Details of this analysis will be found in Appendix 2.

However, although the presence of small percentages of impurities can alter its characteristics (what is exploited to make it fit better various applications) we did not succeed in finding in the literature a significant correlation between impurities and the Emissivity value (ε).

Assuming that MFMP used an alumina very similar to the Hot-Cat alumina, the resulting error in the Radiated Power estimation could be close to 2. In a similar way, the surface temperature would be overestimated by a few hundreds degrees; thus, considering that a wrong temperature measurement has a direct impact also on convection transferred heat by: Q=h*A*(Ts-Tamb), the error on the estimation of the emitted Power may be even higher.

Errors of this level of magnitude would be so important to question seriously the Report content and its conclusions.

Analysis
As previously highlighted in a technical analysis coming from Alan Fletcher, AAs adopt as their calorimetric method a measurement of Radiated Power based on the well known Stefan-Boltzmann law linking the Power emitted to (T)4, where T is the object absolute temperature. This measurement technique requires full knowledge of the value of the surface Emissivity of the object whose temperature one would like to estimate; the reason is that the temperature of the body is a key element for the calculation of the Power radiated through the Stefan-Boltzmann law.

The TPR2 AA decided to measure the Hot-Cat temperature by using only a thermo camera (model Optris PI160) and it is worthwhile to remember that they also said that it was not possible to place a reference thermocouple directly onto the reactor surface to establish a reliable reference of the actual temperature:

We also found that the ridges made thermal contact with any thermocouple probe placed on the outer surface of the reactor extremely critical, making any direct temperature measurement with the required precision impossible.

(This is a claim already disputed in the past because incomprehensible; this claim was proven wrong by MFMP that, instead were successful in placing it). The AA decided to calibrate the camera, used for measuring the surface temperature, according to this procedure:

  1. The temperature provided by the camera is fed to a diagram that maps the Emissivity temperature of pure Alumina (Figure 6 of TPR2)
  2. The diagram is checked to verify if the Emissivity value actually corresponds to the read temperature
  3. When no match is found, the camera Emissivity settings are adjusted until a perfect match between the temperature indicated by the camera and the temperature on the ordinate of the Emissivity/Temperature diagram for Alumina is met
  4. Eventually, the camera Emissivity is set to the found value

This method is correct only if the Alumina surface behaves as a gray body and the used diagram contains Emissivity data [see Note 1] for Alumina very similar to the one actually used. One has to remember that the Emissivity ε of a material is the fraction of energy radiated from the material compared to the energy radiated by a blackbody of the same temperature. Since the blackbody Emissivity is by definition unitary , any real object has Emissivity less than 1: if this value does not depend on the wavelength (λ) such material is called gray body. If instead the Emissivity versus wavelength has a completely different shape, such a material cannot be defined a gray body. This is, for example, the case of Alumina.

In practice, the AA did not adopt any of the techniques suggested by Optris GmbH (IR camera manufacturer) on page 10 of this document to estimate the correct Emissivity value:

Experimental Determination of Emissivities. In the addendum you will find emissivity dates for various materials from technical literature and measurement results. There are different ways to determine the emissivity.
Method 1: With the help of a thermocouple. With the help of a contact probe (thermocouple) an additional simultaneous measurement shows the real temperature of an object surface. Now the emissivity on the infrared thermometer will be adapted so that the temperature displayed corresponds to the value shown with the contact measurement. The contact probe should have good temperature contact and only a low heat dissipation.
Method 2: Creating a black body with a test object from the measuring material. A drilled hole (drilling depth ≤ ⅓) in thermal conducting material reacts similar to a black body with an emissivity near 1. It is necessary to aim at the ground of the drilled hole because of the optical features of the infrared device and the measuring distance . Then the emissivity can be determined.
Method 3: With a reference emissivity. A plaster or band or paint with a known emissivity, which is put onto the object surface, helps to take a reference measurement. With an emissivity thus adjusted on the infrared thermometer the temperature of the plaster, band or paint can be taken. Afterwards the temperature next to this surface spot will be taken, while simultaneously the emissivity will have to be adjusted until the same temperature is displayed as is measured beforehand on the plaster, band or paint. Now the emissivity is displayed on the device.

The AA have made use of specific “Dots” (whose Emissivity value is known) only for the measurement of some parts (the cable rods) whose materials (at much lower temperatures) were not analyzed and verified:

“Dots” of known emissivity, necessary to subsequent data acquisition, were placed in various places on the cable rods. It was not possible to perform this operation on the dummy reactor itself (and a fortiori on the E-Cat), because the temperatures attained by the reactor were much greater than those sustainable by the dots.

It was not possible to extract any samples of the material constituting the rods, as this is firmer than that of the reactor.

It should be noted that (see Figure 1) the Alumina (Al203) Spectral Emissivity values are known in literature and in particular those within the measurement bandwidth of the Optris OP160 thermal imager, this band ranging from 7.5 to 13 µm.

The Emissivity values ε = f (λ, T) are well documented in the publication by the US Department of Commerce National Bureau of Standards, Volume 7 (1971):

Precision Measurement and Calibration – Radiometry and Photometry

Figura 1 - NBS Precision Measurement and Calibration Photometry and Radiometry

Figure 1 – NBS Precision Measurement and Calibration Photometry and Radiometry

As shown in Figure 2A, 2B and Figure 3, for example, for temperatures ranging from 1200K to 1600K (i.e., from about 930 to 1330°C), the Spectral Emissivity measured values, within the camera measurement range, are between 0.85 and 0.95.

Figura 2 - Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght and Temperature

Figure 2 – Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght and Temperature

Figura 2B - Table 2 details

Figure 2B – Table 2 details

Figura 3 - Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght @ 1400 K

Figure 3 – Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght @ 1400 K

In addition to scientific literature, the results of the MFMP measurements show as well how the Alumina Spectral Emissivity value of their simulacrum varies greatly depending on the wavelength λ, for wavelengths close to 10 µm, i.e. in the ordinary camera range, this value is about 0.95 as confirmed by the document : Handbook of the Infrared Optical Properties of Al203. Carbon, MgO and Zr02. Volume 1 (an excerpt of which is available at this link), while the measured value of Total Emissivity (see Figure 4) to be used for calculating the power radiated, for a T around 1000°C, is less than half that value. Note how precisely in the neighborhood of these temperatures (which are probably those taken from the Hot-Cat during the test) one has minimum Emissivity, which in some measurement results to be lower than 0.3.

Figura 4 – Al2O3 Total Emissivity vs Temperature

Figure 4 – Al2O3 Total Emissivity vs Temperature

Furthermore, these measures show that the dispersion of the Total Emissivity real data, at the same temperature, well exceeds the error and the uncertainty that the AA are mentioning in TPR2:

The error associated with the plot’s trend has been measured at ± 0.01 for each value of emissivity: this uncertainty has been taken into account when calculating radiant energy.

In the AA report [ref. 3], R. Morrell, Handbook of properties of technical & engineering ceramics, Part 2, p. 88, in the comments for chart in Figure A4. 10, the author suggests readers should not to take that chart too literally:

Such data should be considered tentative because it is known that emissivity can vary with grain size, porosity and surface finish through varying degrees of translucency and optical scattering.

(In TPR2 Figure 6, Plot 1 was reportedly derived from this table).

The main issue at this point is the fact that the right way to proceed for AA would have been to use the Spectral Emissivity values for temperature measurements (for example, 0.900.95 similar to the values reported by MFMP) and the Total Emissivity value for the calculation of the radiated power by means of the Stefan-Boltzmann formula (typically 0.40 at high temperature). To be noted how these issues show how awkward (and in some ways not very cautious) was the choice to adopt this type of calorimetry.

The value of Emissivity to be used for the thermal imager during acquisition is much higher than that to be used for calculating the Radiated Power. If we consider an operating temperature of 1000°C, the peak spectral emission maximum (Wien peak), is approximately 2.3 µm.

Blackbody Wien displacement Spectrum @ T=1000°C

Blackbody Wien displacement Spectrum @ T=1000°C

Since the Alumina Total Emissivity, as also reported in Figure 6 of the Report, decreases with increasing temperature (i.e., the decrease of the peak emission wavelength), the Total Emissivity to be used for power calculation actually coincides with the value indicated by the diagram (@ 1000°C it is about 0.4), while in the case of the temperature measurement by thermal imager, even if we are observing a body at 1000°C, the value of Emissivity to be used (i.e. the Emissivity within the camera measurement Spectrum) will still be what is appropriate for the reading range of the camera used (7.5-13 μm in this case).

As already noted in other occasions, in order to reduce the Emissivity error problem, those taking measurements in foundries or in the analysis of ovens do not use ordinary cameras (as that used by the AA), but cameras with a reading window in the field 3-5 μm. In our case, the choice of a camera with a reading window equal to 7.5-13 μm for certain aspects appears to be conditioned by the fact that only in that spectral range Alumina shows an Emissivity close to 1.

As an example, Figure 5 shows the Spectral Irradiance at a temperature of 1200K.
For an immediate comparison we calculated and report:

a) the blackbody spectrum @ T=1200K (blue curve)

b) the grey body spectrum @ T=1200K, with 0.45 Total Emissivity (gray curve)

c) the Alumina spectrum (red curve), according to Al203 Spectral Emissivity data @ T=1200K, based on the National Bureau of Standards data (see Figure 2). The missing ε=f(λ) values were obtained by interpolation.

Figura 5 – Planck’s Spectrum 1200K

Figure 5 – Planck’s Spectrum 1200K

Integration of the Black Body Spectrum @ T=1200K provides the theoretical value of Irradiance (Radiant Power RP) that turns out to be 117,573 W/m2. On the other hand, if integration is carried out only within the thermal camera measurement range (7.5 13 μm), one gets the RP value in the measurement bandwidth. Under these conditions, as a consequence of the used values, it is evident that the Grey Body with 0.45 Emissivity (value set in accordance with the TPR2 Plot1 @ T 1200K) has an irradiation significantly lower compared to the Alumina body while being at the same 1200K temperature.

Under these conditions the Black Body RP is 9.96 kW/m2 and, taking the ratio between the Alumina RP (9.4 kW/m2) and that of the Grey Body RP (4.48 kW/m2), one get a 2.1 factor clearly indicating the presence of a large measurement error due to incorrect use of Emissivity parameters.

In the same way, Figure 6 shows the Spectral Irradiance at a temperature of 1400K. As before, for the sake of comparison we calculated and report here:

a) the blackbody spectrum @ T=1400K (blue)

b) the Grey body spectrum @ T=1400K, with 0.4 Total Emissivity (gray)

c) the Alumina spectrum (red) according to data for Al203 Spectral Emissivity @ T=1400K, coming from National Bureau of Standards (see Figure 2). Missing ε=f(λ) values were obtained by interpolation.

Figura 6 – Planck’s Spectrum 1400K

Figure 6 – Planck’s Spectrum 1400K

Similarly, integration of the Black Body Spectrum @ T=1400K provides the theoretical value of Irradiance (Radiant Power RP) equal to 217,819 W/m2. Integration limited to the camera spectral range of measurement (7.513 μm), provides the RP value in the measurement bandwidth. Under these conditions, as a consequence of the used values, it is evident that the Grey Body with 0.4 Emissivity (value set in accordance with the instructions in the Plot1 TPR2 @ T 1400K) has an irradiation significantly lower compared to the Alumina at the same temperature.

In these conditions the Black Body RP is 13kW/m2 and the ratio between the Alumina RP (12.4 kW/m2) and the Grey Body RP (5.2 kW/m2), provides a 2.38 factor indicating the presence of a measurement error due to incorrect use of the Emissivity parameters.

To be noted that in Figures 5 and 6 the diagrams on the left side show the evolution of the spectrum of Planck as a function of frequency (f). Given the characteristic of inverse proportionality between frequency and wavelength, the left part of the diagram as a function of the wavelength (λ) [the diagram on the right] corresponds to the right side of the diagram as a function of the frequency and vice versa.

Figure 7 shows the link between Radiant Power and Temperature with reference to a measurement in the spectral range 7.5 13 μm. The black curve reports precisely the Black body Radiant Power that acts as a reference and calibration curve for the camera.

The graph takes the Emissivity ε as parameter in order to show how it affects the estimation of actual body temperature when measured using this IR camera methodology.

Figura 7 - Radiant Power Vs Temperature and Emissivity (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Figure 7 – Radiant Power Vs Temperature and Emissivity (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

For example, let us consider the 1100K T1 temperature detected by a thermal imager with a wrongly set 0.45 Emissivity (correct value 0.90).

The RP deduced from the graph of Figure 7 for ε=0.45 (about 4 kW/m2) is in fact the one that competes to the curve with ε=0.90 but for an actual temperature T2 of only 800K (temperature overestimated by 300K).

Based on these temperature values, applying the Stefan-Boltzmann relation: P=ε*σ*(T^4-Tamb^4) to calculate the thermal power per unit area radiated by a body (σ=5.67*10^-8 [W/(m2*K4)] and Tamb 300K, i.e. 27°C), we obtain:

Pmeas(T1) = ε1*σ*(1100^4-300^4) = 40.4 [kW/m2]

Preal(T2) = ε2*σ*(800^4-300^4) = 14.7 [kW/m2]

To compare through the SB the power radiated, the Total Emissivity (for these temperatures from the TPR2 Plot1 ε1=0.49 and ε2=0.65) should consider. The ratio between Pmeas and Preal is 2.7 and this result indicates a large overestimation of the thermal power radiated from the body.

Nevertheless, the error may be even higher. Consider for example a temperature T1 of 1320K (about 1050°C) as seen by the camera which has been set (incorrectly) the value of emissivity 0.42 derived from the Plot1 TPR2 instead of the correct value 0.90.

The RP can be deduced from the graph in Figure 7 for ε between 0.40 and 0.45 (about 4.8 kW/m2) is actually the one that pertains to the curve ε = 0.90 but with an actual temperature T2 of only 880K (overestimation of the temperature = 440K).

Based on these temperature values, applying again the SB equations:

Pmeas(T1) = ε1*σ*(1320^4-300^4) = 72.1 [kW/m2]

Preal(T2) = ε2*σ*(880^4-300^4) = 19.8 [kW/m2]

As in the previous example, the Total Emissivity is considered for the SB (for these temperatures from the TPR2 Plot1 ε1=0.42 and ε2=0.59). The ratio between Pmeas and Preal is 3.6 i.e. still a huge overestimation of the thermal power radiated by the body and if, under these conditions, even higher Tmeas values were considered, it is not possible exclude that the error term (which continues to rise quickly, as well as the thermal power overestimation) would be even worse.

Coming back for a while to measurements and data in the MFMP report, it is interesting to see how what we report here is not just theory. The MFMP Test case is represented in Figure 8.

Figura 8 - MFMP Test case

Figure 8 – MFMP Test case

The MFMP have made a change in the emissivity value, by changing the camera settings, applying the change for comparison only to certain observed areas. The value has been changed from 1 to 0.7 for zones 7, 8 and 9.

Let us consider, for example, the area 7 of the device captured by the camera. The corresponding effect on the temperature indicated by the camera is to increase the read values from 985.7°C to 1276.5°C (a change of more than 290°C).

The following Figure 9 (where the area of interest in Figure 7 has been expanded) shows good agreement between the MFMP experimental data and the calculation of the temperature error that would be expected after the erroneous setting of Emissivity, due for example to the uncertainty on the actual value to be applied.

Figura 9 – Temperature error vs Emissivity in MFMP test condition (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Figure 9 – Temperature error vs Emissivity in MFMP test condition (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Finally, applying the SB to this Test case and using data of Total Emissivity (as from TPR2 Plot1), one would gain an overestimation of actual radiated thermal power by a 2.6 factor.

Experimental verification on a Alumina tube
A further experimental verification of the fact that the Emissivity of the Alumina in the field of 8-14 μm is approximately 0.95 was obtained by performing a simple test that makes use of a Pyrometer (a thermal imager was not available).

As can be verified by consulting the instrument Instruction Sheet, the Fluke 80T-IR Pyrometer has a window spectral response 8-14 μm very similar to that of the camera used by the AA in TPR2 (7.5-13 μm) and the instrument is calibrated for a 0.95 Emissivity.
Since the highest operating temperature for this instrument is 260°C, it was decided to limit the alumina temperature at about 160°C. The Pyrometer analog output signal (1 mV/°C) was sent to a milliVolt meter with full scale 200mV.

According to references, the Alumina Spectral Emissivity curve is weakly affected by the temperature so that the measurement is still significant. The AA as well made their calibration (or intended calibration) at a temperature of 450°C while the measures on the Hot-Cat were performed at much higher temperatures.

We used a pure Alumina tube (99.7%) by Sceram, 27mm outer diameter, 20mm inner diameter, 150mm length (code AAH01700, type C799 – DIN VDE 0335).

Four ceramic 68 ohm resistors (10W), in parallel, were inserted in the tube, as shown in Figures I and II.

Figura I

Figure I

Figura II

Figure II

A direct current coming from a stabilized power supply fed the resistors. To ensure good heat exchange between the resistors and the alumina tube, Portland dry powder cement filled any internal cavities, as shown in Figure III.

Figura III

Figure III

A type K thermocouple connected to a thermometer was placed within the alumina tube, as shown in Figure IV.

Figura IV

Figure IV

As shown in Figure V, the whole system was insulated with mineral wool to reduce the thermal exchange thus keeping the temperature remarkably uniform.

Figura V

Figure V

In the central area, the thermal insulation was removed to allow reading of the tube surface temperature by means of the optical Pyrometer.

The power supply voltage was adjusted to ensure that the system was maintained at a temperature of about 160°C (power approximately equal to 10W); comparative readings were then performed. For greater safety, once a thermal steady state was reached, 3 readings were performed with time intervals of tens of minutes (Figures VI, VII, VIII); the three measures provided very similar results.

Figura VI

Figure VI

Figura VII

Figure VII

Figura VIII

Figure VIII

The insulation was not particularly accurate since the presence of a thermal dissipation, and then a thermal gradient between the internal area measured by the thermocouple and the surface measured by the thermometer, provides an Emissivity value lower than the actual one.

The temperature read by the Pyrometer is lower than that read by the thermocouple of about 5°C, difference in part attributable to the thermal flow. Neglecting the difference in temperature resulting from this flow, and considering that the instrument Emissivity is calibrated @ 0.95, the effective Emissivity of the Alumina tube is in a first approximation equal to:

ε = 0.95*[(160 + 273)]^4 / [(165 + 273)]^4 = 0.907

At this temperature, using the TPR2 Emissivity values (0.70 at 160 °C), the Pyrometer read error would be around 34°C.

Conclusions
The MFMP experimental data are in agreement with those reported in the literature and confirm that the procedure and the Emissivity values, used by the TPR2 AA for measurements by the thermal imager, are incorrect. The GSVIT experimental test further showed that the pure Alumina Spectral Emissivity, in the reading field of the camera used to testing the Hot-Cat, is greater than 0.90. These data are very different from those plotted and used in the TPR2 by the AA that appear to be those related to Alumina Total Emissivity. In the 1200-1400°C temperature range, the TPR2 Plot1 considers an emissivity of about 0.40 while, according to the literature, the Spectral Emissivity, in the camera reading field, is stable around values close to 0.95. This kind of error can lead to a significant overestimation of the surface temperature and to an overestimation of thermal Power by a factor 2 or more. An error of such proportions (which appears likely in the light of the measurements) makes not reliable, in our opinion, the TPR2 measurement results of the heat produced by the Hot-Cat; on the contrary, a simple Mass Flow Calorimetry, similar to the one shown in a previous Post of ours, would have been feasible and most accurate.

Equipment used:
Skytronic 650 682 stabilized power supply
Hanna Hi935005 Thermometer
ICE 5600 Tester
Fluke 80T-IR Pyrometer
Radio Controlled Clock
Note 1: The graph of TPR2 Figure 6 shows the values of the alumina Total normal emissivity, that is in a direction perpendicular to the surface, εn (T, θ=0, φ). Since alumina is a dielectric material, the Emissivity value remains (within certain limits) weakly dependent on angle and can be taken as Total Emissivity.
Pubblicato in Hot-Cat - Calorimetria, Hot-Cat - Calorimetria - Calorimetro a flusso | Contrassegnato | 19 commenti

TPR2 – Calorimetria del Hot-Cat eseguita utilizzando una Termocamera IR

Stesura del Report in data: 08/02/2015

Introduzione
Recenti misure sperimentali del Martin Fleischmann Memorial Project (MFMP) hanno messo in evidenza un significativo errore nella misura calorimetrica effettuata sull’Hot-Cat, misura calorimetrica riportata nel documento noto come “TPR2” (Lugano Report). In particolare nel resoconto sperimentale del MFMP viene riportata la seguente considerazione:

The main revelation was that the emissivity required for the camera to correctly interpret the temperatures on the surface was very close to .95. When we plugged in the emissivities cited from literature in the Lugano report (0.8 to 0.4), the apparent temperature was 1200 to 1500C at 900W in.

GSVIT già molto tempo addietro aveva avanzato l’ipotesi che le misure e l’analisi calorimetrica effettuata dagli autori (AA) del Report (prof. G.Levi, E.Foschi, B.Höistad, R.Pettersson, Lars Tegnér, H.Essén) contenessero l’errore fondamentale di considerare l’Allumina, dal punto di vista termico EM, come un corpo assimilabile ad un corpo grigio.

Le misure sperimentali, effettuate dal MFMP, eseguite su una loro replica del dispositivo (un simulacro del Hot-Cat), confermano quella ipotesi del GSVIT e se le misure del MFMP sono corrette, si può affermare che il metodo adottato dagli AA del TPR2 per calcolare la temperatura superficiale del reattore (e quindi la quantità di calore irraggiato) era errato.
Quanto l’utilizzo del metodo errato possa pesare sulla misura della temperatura esterna e sulla misura della Potenza irraggiata non è possibile definirlo con precisione, dato che non è sufficiente che il simulacro sia identico nella forma, nelle misure e realizzato anch’esso di Allumina pura. L’Allumina infatti può presentarsi in 7 forme polimorfe con diversa struttura cristallina e industrialmente la dicitura “Allumina pura” è utilizzata già per purezze del 99%. Ricordiamo a questo proposito gli esiti dell’analisi dei campioni di Allumina del Hot-cat eseguiti e riportati nel TPR2:

The results confirmed that it was indeed alumina, with a purity of at least 99%. Details of this analysis will be found in Appendix 2.

La presenza di piccole percentuali di impurezze può alterare le caratteristiche (e questo è sfruttato per renderla più adatta alle varie applicazioni) ma non abbiamo trovato in letteratura una influenza determinante di tali impurezze sul valore della Emissività ε.

Nell’ipotesi che l’Allumina utilizzata dal MFMP e quella utilizzata nell’Hot-Cat siano molto simili, l’errore introdotto nella stima della Potenza emessa potrebbe essere dell’ordine di un fattore 2, mentre la temperatura superficiale sarebbe stata sopravvalutata di centinaia di gradi e considerando anche che una misura della temperatura errata ha impatto diretto anche sulla parte di calore ceduto per convezione: Q=h*A*(Ts-Tamb), l’errore sulla stima della Potenza emessa potrebbe essere anche superiore.

Errori di questa entità sarebbero talmente rilevanti da mettere fortemente in discussione il contenuto del Report e le sue conclusioni.

Analisi
Come già messo in evidenza nell’analisi tecnica di Alan Fletcher gli AA adottano per la misura calorimetrica una misura della Potenza irraggiata basata sulla nota legge di Stefan-Boltzmann che lega la Potenza emessa alla (T)4, dove T è la temperatura assoluta di un oggetto. Questa tecnica di misura si basa sulla conoscenza del valore esatto di Emissività della superficie della quale si vorrebbe stimare la temperatura, questo perchè il valore di temperatura del corpo è un elemento fondamentale per il calcolo della Potenza irraggiata secondo la legge di Stefan-Boltzmann.

Gli AA del TPR2 hanno deciso di misurare la temperatura del Hot-Cat utilizzando solo la termocamera (termocamera tipo Optris PI160) e va ricordato che hanno anche affermato che non era possibile posizionare una termocoppia di confronto applicata direttamente sulla superficie del reattore per stabilire dei riferimenti affidabili dell’effettiva temperatura:

We also found that the ridges made thermal contact with any thermocouple probe placed on the outer surface of the reactor extremely critical, making any direct temperature measurement with the required precision impossible.

(una affermazione questa già contestata all’epoca perchè incomprensibile, il fatto che il MFMP invece sia riuscito nell’intento smentisce di fatto quelle loro affermazioni) ed hanno deciso di calibrare la termocamera, utilizzata per la misura della temperatura superficiale, basandosi sul seguente procedimento:

  1. si rileva il valore della temperatura indicato dalla termocamera e con quello si entra nel diagramma che associa l’Emissività alla temperatura dell’Allumina pura (Figura 6 del TPR2)
  2. successivamente sul diagramma si controlla se quel valore di Emissività corrisponde effettivamente al valore di temperatura letta.
  3. supponendo che non corrisponda, si varia l’impostazione dell’Emissività sulla termocamera fino a trovare il valore che porta alla coincidenza tra il valore di temperatura indicato dalla termocamera e il valore di temperatura in ordinata sul diagramma Emissività/Temperatura relativo all’Allumina
  4. ed infine si imposta nella termocamera un valore di Emissività pari a quell’ipotetico valore

Questo metodo sarebbe corretto se la superficie dell’Allumina si comportasse come un corpo grigio e nell’ipotesi che i dati del diagramma utilizzato [relativi all’Emissività Totale (Nota1)] si riferissero ad una Allumina identica a quella effettivamente utilizzata. Si ricorda che l’Emissività ε di un materiale è la frazione di energia irraggiata dal materiale rispetto all’energia irraggiata da un corpo nero alla stessa temperatura. Assunta unitaria l’Emissività del corpo nero un qualunque oggetto reale ha Emissività inferiore: se il valore non dipende dalla lunghezza d’onda λ tale materiale viene denominato corpo grigio. Se il valore dell’Emissività invece varia apprezzabilmente in funzione della lunghezza d’onda non si può definire tale materiale come corpo grigio. Questo è, ad esempio, il caso dell’Allumina.

Gli AA sostanzialmente non hanno adottato nessuna delle tecniche suggerite da Optris GmbH (IR camera manufacturer) a pagina 10 di questo documento, al fine di stimare il corretto valore dell’Emissività:

Experimental Determination of Emissivities In the addendum you will find emissivity dates for various materials from technical literature and measurement results. There are different ways to determine the emissivity.
Method 1: With the help of a thermocouple. With the help of a contact probe (thermocouple) an additional simultaneous measurement shows the real temperature of an object surface. Now the emissivity on the infrared thermometer will be adapted so that the temperature displayed corresponds to the value shown with the contact measurement. The contact probe should have good temperature contact and only a low heat dissipation.
Method 2: Creating a black body with a test object from the measuring material. A drilled hole (drilling depth ≤ ⅓) in thermal conducting material reacts similar to a black body with an emissivity near 1. It is necessary to aim at the ground of the drilled hole because of the optical features of the infrared device and the measuring distance. Then the emissivity can be determined.
Method 3: With a reference emissivity. A plaster or band or paint with a known emissivity, which is put onto the object surface, helps to take a reference measurement. With an emissivity thus adjusted on the infrared thermometer the temperature of the plaster, band or paint can be taken. Afterwards the temperature next to this surface spot will be taken, while simultaneously the emissivity will have to be adjusted until the same temperature is displayed as is measured beforehand on the plaster, band or paint. Now the emissivity is displayed on the device.

Gli AA si sono avvalsi degli specifici “Dots” (il cui valore di Emissività è noto) solo per quanto riguarda la misura di alcune parti (i cable rods) i cui materiali (a temperature molto  inferiori) non sono stati analizzati e verificati:

“Dots” of known emissivity, necessary to subsequent data acquisition, were placed in various places on the cable rods. It was not possible to perform this operation on the dummy reactor itself (and a fortiori on the E-Cat), because the temperatures attained by the reactor were much greater than those sustainable by the dots.

It was not possible to extract any sample of the material constituting the rods, as this is firmer than that of the reactor.

Va rilevato che in letteratura (vedere Figura 1) sono noti i valori di Emissività spettrale dell’Allumina (Al2O3) ed in particolare quelli nella banda di misura della termocamera Optris OP160, banda che va da 7.5 a 13 µm.

I valori di Emissività ε = f(λ,T) sono documentati nel pubblicazione del 1971 del U.S. Department of Commerce National Bureau of Standard, volume 7:

Precision Measurement and Calibration – Radiometry and Photometry

Figura 1 - NBS Precision Measurement and Calibration Photometry and Radiometry

Figura 1 – NBS Precision Measurement and Calibration Photometry and Radiometry

e come mostrato in Figura 2A,2B e Figura 3 ad esempio per temperature comprese tra 1200 e 1600 K cioè da circa 930 a 1330 °C, l’Emissività Spettrale assume un valore misurato compreso tra 0.85 e 0.95 nel campo di misura della termocamera.

Figura 2 - Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght and Temperature

Figura 2A – Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght and Temperature

Figura 2B - Table 2 details

Figura 2B – Table 2 details

Figura 3 - Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght @ 1400 K

Figura 3 – Alumina (99+) Emittance vs Wavelenght @ 1400 K

Oltre alla letteratura scientifica, anche i risultati delle misure effettuate dal MFMP mostrano come il valore di Emissività Spettrale dell’Allumina del loro simulacro vari grandemente in funzione della lunghezza d’onda λ, per lunghezze d’onda prossime ai 10 µm, cioè nel campo letto dalle normali termocamere, tale valore risulta circa 0.95, valori sostanzialmente confermati anche dal documento: Handbook of the Infrared Optical Properties of Al2O3. Carbon, MGO and ZrO2. Volume 1 (di cui uno stralcio è reperibile a questo link), mentre il valore misurato di Emissività Totale (vedere Figura 4) da utilizzare per il calcolo della potenza irraggiata, per una T intorno ai 1000°C, risulta meno della metà. Si noti come proprio nell’intorno di queste temperature (che sono quelle probabilmente assunte dall’Hot-Cat durante il test) si abbia il minimo di emissività, che in qualche misurazione risulta essere inferiore a 0.3.

Figura 4 – Al2O3 Total Emissivity vs Temperature

Figura 4 – Al2O3 Total Emissivity vs Temperature

 

Inoltre queste misure mostrano come la dispersione reale dei dati di Emissività Totale, a parità di temperatura, vada ben oltre l’errore e l’incertezza che gli AA citano nel TPR2:

The error associated with the plot’s trend has been measured at ± 0.01 for each value of emissivity: this uncertainty has been taken into account when calculating radiant energy.

ed anche R.Morrell, autore del testo preso a riferimento [3] dagli AA, nel suo libro: Handbook of properties of technical & engineering ceramics, Part 2, precisa a pagina 88, a commento del suo grafico di pagina 87 Figura A4.10 (quello posto come Figura 6 del TPR2 e che poi ha dato origine al Plot1 del TPR2), mettendo in guardia il lettore dal prendere quel grafico troppo alla lettera:

Such data should be considered tentative because it is known that emissivity can vary with grain size, porosity and surface finish through varying  degrees of optical translucency and scattering.

La questione principale rimane comunque quella che gli AA avrebbero dovuto utilizzare il valore di Emissività Spettrale per le misure con la termocamera (ad esempio 0.900.95 similmente ai valori rilevati dal MFMP) mentre il valore dell’Emissivita’ Totale per il calcolo della Potenza irraggiata applicando la formula di Stefan-Boltzmann (tipicamente 0.40 ad alta temperatura). Si noti come queste questioni dimostrano quanto delicata (e per certi versi poco oculata) sia stata la scelta di adottare questo tipo di calorimetria.

Il valore di Emissività da utilizzare per la termocamera risulta molto superiore a quello da utilizzare per il calcolo della Potenza irraggiata. Se si considera una temperatura di esercizio di 1000°C, il picco spettrale di emissione massima (picco di Wien), si trova a circa 2.3 µm.

Blackbody Wien displacement Spectrum @ T=1000°C

Blackbody Wien displacement Spectrum @ T=1000°C

Dal momento che l’Emissività Totale dell’Allumina, come anche riportato nella Figura 6 del Report, diminuisce all’aumentare della temperatura (cioè al diminuire della lunghezza d’onda del picco di emissione), l’Emissività Totale da utilizzare per il calcolo della potenza coincide effettivamente col valore indicato dal diagramma (a 1000°C indica circa 0.4), mentre nel caso della misura tramite termocamera, anche se stiamo osservando un corpo a 1000°C, il valore di Emissività da utilizzare (cioè l’Emissività nello Spettro di misura della termocamera) sarà comunque quello che compete al campo di lettura della termocamera utilizzata (7.5-13 µm in questo caso).

Come già sottolineato in altre occasioni, al fine di ridurre il problema dell’errore di Emissività, in fonderia e nell’analisi dei forni non si utilizzano delle normali termocamere (come invece hanno utilizzato gli AA), ma le termocamere con finestra di lettura nel campo 3-5 µm. In questo caso la scelta di una termocamera con finestra di lettura 7.5-13 µm per taluni aspetti appare condizionata dal fatto che solo in quel campo spettrale l’Allumina presenza Emissività prossima a 1.

A titolo di esempio in Figura 5 è riportata l’Irradianza Spettrale alla temperatura di 1200K.

Per un confronto immediato sono stati calcolati e riportati:

a) in blu lo Spettro di un Corpo Nero @ T=1200K

b) in grigio lo Spettro che un Corpo Grigio @ T=1200K, di Emissività Totale 0.45

c) in rosso lo Spettro del corpo di Allumina secondo i dati di Emissività Spettrale del Al2O3 @ T=1200K, ricavato sulla base dei dati del National Bureau of Standard (vedere Figura 2). I valori ε = f(λ) mancanti sono stati ottenuti per interpolazione.

Figura 5 – Planck’s Spectrum 1200K

Figura 5 – Planck’s Spectrum 1200K

Integrando lo Spettro  per il Corpo Nero @ T=1200K si ottiene il valore teorico di Irradianza (Radiant Power RP) pari a 117573 W/m2. Integrando invece solo l’area dello Spettro che cade all’interno del range spettrale di misura della Termocamera (che ricordiamo essere 7.513 µm), si ottiene il valore di RP nella banda di misura. In queste condizioni per effetto dei valori utilizzati, risulta evidente che il Corpo Grigio con Emissività 0.45 (valore settato in accordo con quanto riportato nel Plot1 del TPR2 @ T 1200K) presenta irradiazione largamente inferiore rispetto al Corpo di Allumina pur essendo alla medesima Temperatura di 1200K.

In queste condizioni per Corpo Nero la RP vale 9.96kW/m2 e calcolando il rapporto tra la RP dell’Allumina 9.4kW/m2 e quella del Corpo Grigio 4.48kW/m2, si ottiene un fattore 2.1 che testimonia la presenza dell’errore di misura dovuto all’errato utilizzo dei parametri di Emissività.

Analogamente in Figura 6 è riportata l’Irradianza Spettrale alla temperatura di 1400K. Come in precedenza per un confronto immediato sono stati calcolati e riportati:

a) in blu lo Spettro di un Corpo Nero @ T=1400K

b) in grigio lo Spettro che un Corpo Grigio @ T=1400K, di Emissività Totale 0.4

c) in rosso lo Spettro del corpo di Allumina secondo i dati di Emissività Spettrale del Al2O3 @ T=1400K, ricavato sulla base dei dati del National Bureau of Standard (vedere Figura 2). I valori ε = f(λ) mancanti sono stati ottenuti per interpolazione.

Figura 6 – Planck’s Spectrum 1400K

Figura 6 – Planck’s Spectrum 1400K

Analogamente integrando lo Spettro per il Corpo Nero @ T=1400K si ottiene il valore teorico di Irradianza (Radiant Power RP) pari a 217819 W/m2. Integrando invece solo l’area dello Spettro che cade all’interno del range spettrale di misura della Termocamera (che ricordiamo essere 7.513 µm), si ottiene il valore di RP nella banda di misura. In queste condizioni per effetto dei valori utilizzati, risulta evidente che il Corpo Grigio con Emissività 0.4 (valore settato in accordo con quanto riportato nel Plot1 del TPR2 @ T 1400K) presenta irradiazione largamente inferiore rispetto al Corpo di Allumina pur essendo alla medesima Temperatura di 1400K.

In queste condizioni per Corpo Nero la RP vale 13kW/m2 e calcolando il rapporto tra la RP dell’Allumina 12.4kW/m2 e quella del Corpo Grigio 5.2kW/m2, si ottiene un fattore 2.38 che testimonia la presenza dell’errore di misura dovuto all’errato utilizzo dei parametri di Emissività.

Notare che i diagrammi a sinistra nelle due Figure 5 e 6 mostrano l’andamento dello spettro di Planck in funzione della frequenza (f). Data la caratteristica di proporzionalità inversa tra frequenza e lunghezza d’onda, la parte sinistra del diagramma in funzione della lunghezza d’onda (λ) [il diagramma posto sulla destra] corrisponde alla parte destra del diagramma in funzione della frequenza e viceversa.

La Figura 7 mostra il legame tra Radiant Power e la Temperatura riferita ad una misurazione nel range spettrale 7.513 µm. La curva color nero rappresenta appunto la Radiant Power del Corpo Nero che fa da riferimento e curva di calibrazione per la termocamera.

Il grafico ha a parametro l’Emissività ε al fine di mostrare quanto essa incida sulla stima della reale temperatura del corpo quando quest’ultima venga misurata utilizzando questo tipo di metodologia con termocamera IR.

Figura 7 - Radiant Power Vs Temperature and Emissivity (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Figura 7 – Radiant Power Vs Temperature and Emissivity (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Si consideri ad esempio la temperatura T1 di 1100K rilevata con una termocamera nella quale sia stata settata (erroneamente) una Emissività di 0.45 al posto del valore corretto 0.90.

La RP desumibile dal grafico di Figura 7 per una ε=0.45 (circa 4kW/m2) è in realtà quella che compete alla curva ε=0.90 ma con una Temperatura effettiva T2 di soli 800K (sovrastima della temperatura di 300K).

Sulla base di questi valori di temperatura, se si applica la relazione Stefan-Boltzmann: P=ε*σ*(T^4-Tamb^4) allo scopo di calcolare la potenza termica radiata da un corpo per unità di superficie (σ=5.67*10^-8 [W/(m2*K4)] e Tamb 300K, cioè 27°C), si ottiene:

Pmeas(T1) = ε1*σ*(1100^4-300^4) = 40.4 [kW/m2]

Preal(T2) = ε2*σ*(800^4-300^4) = 14.7 [kW/m2]

per eseguire il raffronto della Potenza irradiata con la SB va considerata l’Emissività Totale (per queste temperature da Plot1 del TPR2 ε1=0.49 e ε2=0.65). Il rapporto tra Pmeas e Preal vale 2.7 e questo risultato indica una grande sovrastima della Potenza termica irradiata dal corpo del quale invece si vorrebbe valutare con precisione il calore ceduto all’ambiente per irradiazione elettromagnetica.

Ma l’errore può essere anche superiore. Si consideri ad esempio una temperatura T1 di 1320K (circa 1050°C) come rilevata dalla termocamera nella quale sia stato settato (erroneamente) il valore di Emissività di 0.42 desunto dal Plot1 del TPR2 al posto del valore corretto 0.90.

La RP desumibile dal grafico di Figura 7 per una ε compresa tra 0.40 e 0.45 (circa 4.8kW/m2) è in realtà quella che compete alla curva ε=0.90 ma con una Temperatura effettiva T2 di soli 880K (sovrastima della temperatura di 440K).

Sulla base di questi valori di temperatura, applicando poi la relazione Stefan-Boltzmann si ottiene:

Pmeas(T1) = ε1*σ*(1320^4-300^4) = 72.1 [kW/m2]

Preal(T2) = ε2*σ*(880^4-300^4) = 19.8[kW/m2]

come nell’esempio precedente per la SB si considera l’Emissività Totale (per queste temperature da Plot1 del TPR2 ε1=0.42 e ε2=0.59). Il rapporto tra Pmeas e Preal risulta 3.6 cioè ancora una enorme sovrastima della Potenza termica irradiata dal corpo e se, in queste condizioni, si considerassero valori di Tmeas della termocamera ancora superiori, non si puo’ escludere che i risultati in termine di errore (che continua ad incrementarsi velocemente, come pure la sovrastima della Potenza termica) sarebbero ancora peggiori.

Ritornando per un attimo alle misure e ai dati del resoconto del MFMP è interesante verificare come quella esposta non sia solo teoria. Il Test case del MFMP è rappresentato in Figura 8.

Figura 8 - MFMP Test case

Figura 8 – MFMP Test case

Il MFMP ha operato una variazione del valore di Emissività, modificando il settaggio sulla termocamera, applicandolo per confronto solo ad alcune zone osservate. Il valore è stato variato da 1 a 0.7 per le zone n.7, n.8 e n.9.

Consideriamo ad esempio la zona n.7 del dispositivo inquadrato dalla telecamera. L’effetto conseguente sulla temperatura indicata dalla temocamera è che i valori letti passano da 985.7°C a 1276.5°C (un variazione di oltre 290°C).

La figura seguente (Figura 9, ampliata rispetto alla precente Figura 7 per rappresentare meglio la zona di interesse) mostra l’esistenza di un buon accordo tra i dati sperimetali del MFMP e il calcolo dell’errore di temperatura che ci si aspetterebbe a fronte di quel erroneo settaggio dell’Emissività, dovuto ad esempio all’incertezza sul valore effettivo che è da applicare.

Figura 9 – Temperature error vs Emissivity in MFMP test condition (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Figura 9 – Temperature error vs Emissivity in MFMP test condition (Spectral range 7.5-13 µm)

Infine applicando a questo Test case la SB ed utilizzando i dati di Emissività Totale  (come da Plot1 del TPR2), si ricaverebbe una sovrastima della Potenza termica effettivamente irradiata di un fattore 2.6.

Verifica sperimentale tubo di Allumina
Una ulteriore verifica sperimentale del fatto che l’Emissività dell’Allumina nel campo 8-14 µm vale circa 0.95 è stata ottenuta eseguendo un semplice test che fa uso di un Pirometro (non avendo a disposizione una termocamera).

Come si può verificare consultando l’Instruction Sheet dello strumento, il Pirometro 80T-IR della Fluke ha una finestra spettrale di risposta 8-14 µm molto simile a quella della termocamera utilizzata dagli AA nel TPR2 (7.5-13 µm) e lo strumento è calibrato per una Emissività pari a 0.95.
Poiché il limite operativo di temperatura per tale strumento è di 260°C  si è deciso di limitare la temperatura dell’allumina a circa 160°C. L’uscita analogica del Pirometro, pari a 1mV/°C , è stata collegata a un milliVoltmetro con fondo scala 200mV.

Secondo la bibliografia la curva dell’Emissività spettrale dell’Allumina è poco influenzata dalla temperatura per cui la misura risulta comunque significativa. Gli stessi AA hanno eseguito quella che secondo loro era la calibrazione alla temperatura di 450°C mentre le misure del Hot-Cat sono state eseguite a temperature decisamente superiori.

Si è utilizzato un tubo in Allumina pura (99.7%) della Sceram, diametro esterno 27mm, diametro interno 20mm, lunghezza 150mm (codice AAH01700, tipo C799 – DIN VDE 0335).

All’interno del tubo, come visibile nelle Figure I e II sono state inserite 4 resistenze da 68 ohm 10W in ceramica, collegate in parallelo.

Figura I

Figura I

Figura II

Figura II

Le resistenze sono state alimentate in Corrente Continua mediante alimentatore stabilizzato. Per garantire un buon scambio di calore tra le resistenze e il tubo in Allumina si è riempita ogni cavità interna mediante polvere secca di cemento Potland, come visibile in Figura III.

Figura III

Figura III

All’interno del tubo di Allumina è stata posta una termocoppia tipo K collegata a un termometro, come visibile in Figura IV.

Figura IV

Figura IV

Come visibile in Figura V, l’intero sistema è stato coibentato mediante lana di roccia per ridurre lo scambio termico garantendo così una notevole uniformità di temperatura.

Figura V

Figura V

Nella zona centrale l’isolamento termico viene interrotto per permettere la lettura della temperatura superficiale del tubo mediante il Pirometro ottico.

La tensione dell’alimentatore è stata regolata per far sì che il sistema si stabilizzasse alla temperatura di circa 160°C (potenza circa pari a 10W), poi sono state eseguite le letture comparative. Per maggior sicurezza, una volta raggiunta la stabilità termica, sono state eseguite 3 letture a distanza di decine di minuti (Figure VI, VII, VIII), le tre misure hanno fornito risultati molto simili.

Figura VI

Figura VI

Figura VII

Figura VII

Figura VIII

Figura VIII

La coibentazione non è stata particolarmente curata dal momento che la presenza di una dissipazione termica, quindi di un gradiente termico tra la zona interna misurata dalla termocoppia e la superficie misurata dal termometro, porta al limite ad una stima del valore di Emissività inferiore al reale.

La temperatura letta dal Pirometro è risultata inferiore a quella letta dalla termocoppia di circa 5°C, differenza in parte imputabile al flusso termico. Trascurando la differenza di temperatura derivante da tale flusso e considerando che lo strumento è calibrato per una Emissività di 0.95, l’effettiva Emissività del tubo di Allumina risulta in prima approssimazione pari a:

 ε= 0.95* [(160 + 273) ]^4 / [(165 + 273) ]^4 = 0.907

A questa temperatura, utilizzando i valori di Emissività del TPR2 che a 160°C risultava valere circa 0.70, l’errore di lettura del Pirometro sarebbe stato di circa 34°C.

Conclusioni
I dati sperimentali ricavati dal MFMP sono in accordo con quelli presenti in letteratura e confermano che la procedura ed i valori di Emissività, utilizzati dagli AA del TPR2 per le misure con la termocamera, sono errati. Il test sperimentale GSVIT ha ulteriormente dimostrato che l’Emissività Spettrale dell’Allumina pura, nel campo di lettura della termocamera utilizzata durante i test sull’Hot-Cat, è superiore a 0.90. Questi dati risultano molto diversi da quelli diagrammati ed utilizzati nel TPR2 dagli AA che risultano essere quelli relativi all’Emissività Totale dell’Allumina. Nel range di temperature 1200-1400°C il Plot1 del TPR2 fa riferimento ad una Emissività di circa 0.40 mentre secondo la letteratura l’Emissività Spettrale, nel campo di lettura della termocamera, si mantiene intorno a valori prossimi a 0.95. Questo genere di errore può portare ad una notevole sovrastima della temperatura superficiale e ad una sovrastima della Potenza termica di un fattore 2 o più. Un errore di queste proporzioni (che alla luce delle misure eseguite appare probabile) rende i risultati delle misure del calore prodotto dal Hot-Cat, riportate nel TPR2, a nostro avviso non attendibili, mentre sarebbe stata fattibile una semplice ed accurata Calorimetria a flusso similmente a quella illustrata nel precedente Post.

Strumentazione utilizzata:
Alimentatore stabilizzato Skytronic 650.682
Termometro Hanna Hi935005
Tester ICE 5600
Pirometro Fluke 80T-IR
Orologio radiocontrollato
Nota1: Il grafico di Figura 6 del TPR2 riporta i valori di Total normal emissivity dell’Allumina, cioe’ nella direzione perpendicolare alla superficie, εn(T, θ=O, φ). Trattandosi di materiale dielettrico il valore di Emissività rimane (entro certi limiti) poco dipendente dall’angolo ed in quel caso puo’ essere assunto come Emissività Totale.
Pubblicato in Hot-Cat - Calorimetria, Hot-Cat - Calorimetria - Calorimetro a flusso | Lascia un commento

Further measurements on the MD-6K-N pump used by Tadahiko Mizuno

First issue: 10/01/2015
Publication: 10/01/2015
Translation: 12/01/2015

After reading recently a comment (posted in the mail-archive vortex-l by Dave Roberson) regarding our recent calorimetry measurement of the magnetic drive pump Iwaki MD6, followed by a post that tried to explain the large difference between the power transferred to water during our tests (4.3W) and that estimated by Jed Rothwell (0.25W), we decided to respond with a new post rather than just putting a simple answer in the comments, in the hope that shedding light on these measures can be helpful to anyone willing to address these issues.

Roberson in his comment asserted that the different obtained values were due to the pipe diameter difference (5mm in our test, 10mm in the Mizuno’s pipe).

In particular, he writes:

…Now our favorite skeptic claims that he is using .5 cm pipe instead of the 1 cm pipe used by Mizuno and does not realize that he is making a major error. But, the area of that pipe is reduced by a factor of 4 since it is exactly 1/2 the inner diameter of the original. With a factor of 4 reduction in area comes an increase in the velocity of the water flowing through it by that factor 4 in order to achieve the same mass flow rate. Every thing else being equal you find that the energy imparted upon the water that is sped up from rest to a velocity that is 4 times that from the first case yields the square of that factor. In which case it is 4^2 which is 16 times.

According to this comment, since the pipe used by GSVIT has a diameter half that used by Mizuno, its section is 4 times smaller, and the speed of water at the output 4 times higher; since the kinetic energy depends on the square of the velocity, the kinetic energy associated with water at the output (that is transformed into heat by friction) is 16 times higher, the exact relationship between the two measurements (4.3W against 0.25W).

The commentator also ended by thanking the Mathematics that in his view had solved the problem and congratulated Jed.

…I love it when the math holds up so well.
Congratulations Jed, you got it right.

Unfortunately we have to disenchant him. His reasoning is typical of a person who has scientific knowledge but, almost certainly due to a lack of experience in the field, has analyzed the problem only at it surface. We hope that these notes and the further test that we have added can convince him (and those who make use of his approach) that the reality may seem simple, but almost always the simplest systems, if not observed with the necessary depth, can deceive and lead to erroneous conclusions.

First of all let’s be clear that he would have to be aware of his error by the following simple calculation based on the very few data provided by the pump manufacturer and already published in our previous post:

  • maximum pump flow = 8 litres / min
  • maximum pump head = 1 meter H2O

Obviously the head decreases with increasing flow rate, and the maximum flow is measured at 0 head, as per original data sheet.

We considered, however, applying more conservative constrains, to have simultaneously the maximum flow rate and the maximum head.

The power transferred to the water under these conditions is [by standard theory]:

P = q * ρ * g * h

where:

  • q è la flow capacity = [(8 x 10^-3) /60] m3/s
  • ρ è la density of water @20°C = 998 kg/m3
  • g è la standard acceleration gravity = 9.81 m/s2
  • h è la differential head = 1 m

so that P = [(8 x 10^-3) /60] x 998 x 9.81 x 1 = 1.3W

from this calculation it is clear, however, that this is not the right way to explain a 4W difference.

If we calculate the kinetic energy associated with the water jet exiting the discharge the pump [as done by Roberson], assuming as he does that the flow rate remains the same when passing from 5mm to 10mm [that is wrong], we can write:

  1. water speed @10mm = (8 x 10^-3/60)/[(5 x 10^-3)^2 x π] = 1.7 m/s
  2. water speed @ 5mm = (8 x 10^-3/60)/[(2.5 x 10^-3)^2 x π] = 6.8 m/s
  3. power in the first case = ½ x (8 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (1.7)^2 = 0.19W
  4. power in the second case = ½ x (8 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (6.8)^2 = 3.07W

Note that this power (ref. 4) is still significantly lower than the measured 4.3W, but it is certainly much higher than the actual value since we considered that the pump could simultaneously provide the maximum flow (8 liters / h) and the maximum head (1 m). The output speed calculated in the case of the 5mm pipe is in fact too high (6.8 m/s !) and corresponds (with a 100% nozzle efficiency) to 2.3 meters head, whereas the pump actually has a maximum head of 1 meter.

For verification, as shown in Figure I, we connected again 5mm pipe to the pump to measure the actual output speed of the water.

Figure I - Pump with a 5mm pipe output

Figure I – Pump with a 5mm pipe output

Figure II shows that the jet has a length of 28cm and the height difference between the nozzle and the surface of the water, where the jet is falling, is 10cm.

Figure II - Jet Pump 28cm and 10cm height difference

Figure II – Jet Pump 28cm and 10cm height difference

From Physics, using classical formulas for uniformly accelerated motion, we can write:

(a) for the vertical motion: s = ½ x g x (t^2 )

0.1 = ½ x 9.81 x t^2 which immediately provides: t = 0.143 seconds

(b) for the horizontal motion: s = v x t

0.28 = v x 0.143 from which it is immediately obtained: v = 1.96 m/s

The flow rate is: Q = π x ((2.5 x 10^-3)^2) x 1.96 = 3.85 x 10^-5 m3/s, and then only 2.31 l/min

The power associated with the kinetic energy is then: P = ½ x (2.31 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (1.96^2) = 0.074W

The resulting power is very small and is lower than that calculated for the 10 mm pipe because in that case as well a 8 l / min flow rate was considered, while the 40cm long 5mm pipe used in this measurement (the same we used in our original test) set the pump working point very close to the working point in the Mizuno system (which adopted a 10mm pipe, but 16 meters long), as it was our intention.

The power associated with the real flow, in the Mizuno’s system, was about:

P = ½ x (2.3 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (0.49)^2 = 0.0046W.

It is thus demonstrated that the difference in power measured by us (4.3W) and that indicated by Rothwell (0.25W) is not caused by the pipe diameter.

These simple calculations would be sufficient to set the matter, but here we want to take the opportunity to clarify what we wrote privately to Rothwell about the matter: actually the pipe diameter has no influence on power transferred from the pump to the water, being in reality this power equal to the flow rate times the load loss (head) in the working point of the pump. As explained in the description of the previous test, the pipe diameter has been calculated in order to have a load loss (approximately) equal to that of the Mizuno’s system. Had we adopted a pipe of the same diameter as that used by Mizuno, but shorter, the working point of the pump would have been moved to higher flow and lower head, with the result of increasing (albeit slightly) the power transferred to water. On the other hand, it was impractical to use a 10mm pipe 16 meters long, because the heat loss to the environment would have been excessive thus affecting the measurement.

Figure 1 shows typical curves of a centrifugal pump.

Figure 1 - Typical curves of a centrifugal pump

Figure 1 – Typical curves of a centrifugal pump

As one can see the power consumption (heat transferred to the fluid) grows with decreasing head and is maximum at zero head. Therefore, the decision to adopt that very diameter was taken to avoid measuring a power greater than the real one. A proof of this assertion was obtained when running again the calorimetry test on the pump, increasing the diameter to 10mm, as shown in the following.

Test using a 10mm diameter pipe

Since it is not a test of special importance (it has only demonstration purposes as a response to some comments ) no insulation was applied. This fact, combined with the pipe larger surface area, explains why the delta temperature versus time characteristics is inclined more than in the previous test when the water temperature exceeds the room temperature substantially. However, in this case as well, the measured curve can be approximated by a straight line if the water temperature is kept close to the ambient one (a few °C): So the evaluation was performed in the range 18.1 °C – 23.0 °C, with 20.0 °C in the environment.

Figure 2 shows the new set-up, virtually identical to the previous one, save the paper box that supports the pump.

Figure 2 - Set-up

Figure 2 – Set-up

Figure 3 shows the temperature versus time during the test.

Figure 3 - Plot temperature / time during the test

Figure 3 – Plot temperature / time during the test

Figure 4 shows the system at the beginning of the period considered in the dissipated power calculation.

Figure 4 - T1 temperature

Figure 4 – T1 temperature

In Figure 5 one can see the system at the end of the period taken into account in the calculation of the dissipated power.

Figure 5 - T2 temperature

Figure 5 – T2 temperature

 

The power P transferred from the pump is:
P = 4183 x 0.800 x (T2T1) /t

where:

  • 4183 the water specific heat @ 20°C [J/kg°C]
  • 0.800 the water mass to be heated [kg]
  • T2 is the final temperature [°C]
  • T1 is the initial temperature [C°]
  • t is the time between the two measurements [s]

Considering the values ​​taken from the two photographs (Figure 4 and Figure 5) performed at 1.9 ° C below (T1) and 2.9 ° C above (T2) the ambient temperature and taken respectively at 8:43:31 and at 09:42:34, that is, 3543 seconds away, we have that the power transferred from the pump to the water is equal to 4.6W.

As can be seen the power is slightly higher than that measured in the first test.

In Figure 6 the motor temperature is visible (measured by a pyrometer): it is slightly higher than that of the first test;

Figure 6 – Motor temperature measured by the pyrometer

Figure 6 – Motor temperature measured by the pyrometer

this is normal, being the delivered power slightly greater; however, it is also possible that at least part of the difference is due to a slightly higher supply voltage or reading at a warmer point.

We therefore confirm our measurement of the heat transferred to the water from the pump.

As Jed Rothwell continues to maintain that our value is impossible, we invite him to run again (he himself or together with Mizuno) measurement according to our procedure, since, as we have shown, the test takes no more than 2-3 hours and to publish photos and diagrams as we did.

At this point we must ask ourselves how it is possible that the pump delivers more than 4W to the water, if the theoretical mechanical work exerted by the pump on the water, as we have seen, is 20 times smaller.

One explanation is that these small magnetic drive centrifugal pumps have a very low efficiency, rarely exceeding 0.3.

But this would explain a dissipated power in the order of 1 – 2W, but does not appear sufficient to explain 4.6W.

The explanation (that we already communicated in private to Rothwell) is that a not negligible amount of heat flows by conduction from the motor (which, as seen in Figure 6 is at 45 ° C) to the water through the wall of the magnetic coupling.

For clarity in Figure 7 and 8 one can see the disassembled pump.

Figure 7 - Disassembled pump and magnetic driver temperature magnetico

Figure 7 – Disassembled pump and magnetic driver temperature

Figure 8 - Disassembled pump

Figure 8 – Disassembled pump

As it is clearly seen the water surrounding the magnet is in direct contact with the thin plastic wall that, externally, is in contact with the magnetic driver, whose temperature, after disassembly, at the end of the test was still 42.5 °C, as shown in Fig 7.

These photos contradict what Rothwell states, that these pumps are constructed so as to prevent any flow of heat from the motor to the fluid.

Equipment used:
Iso-Tech IDM91E Tester
Hanna Hi935005 Thermometer
RS 1319A Thermometer
Fluke 80T-IR IR Meter
8A Variac
850cc Dewar vessel
Radio Controlled Clock
Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Contrassegnato | Lascia un commento