Further measurements on the MD-6K-N pump used by Tadahiko Mizuno

First issue: 10/01/2015
Publication: 10/01/2015
Translation: 12/01/2015

After reading recently a comment (posted in the mail-archive vortex-l by Dave Roberson) regarding our recent calorimetry measurement of the magnetic drive pump Iwaki MD6, followed by a post that tried to explain the large difference between the power transferred to water during our tests (4.3W) and that estimated by Jed Rothwell (0.25W), we decided to respond with a new post rather than just putting a simple answer in the comments, in the hope that shedding light on these measures can be helpful to anyone willing to address these issues.

Roberson in his comment asserted that the different obtained values were due to the pipe diameter difference (5mm in our test, 10mm in the Mizuno’s pipe).

In particular, he writes:

…Now our favorite skeptic claims that he is using .5 cm pipe instead of the 1 cm pipe used by Mizuno and does not realize that he is making a major error. But, the area of that pipe is reduced by a factor of 4 since it is exactly 1/2 the inner diameter of the original. With a factor of 4 reduction in area comes an increase in the velocity of the water flowing through it by that factor 4 in order to achieve the same mass flow rate. Every thing else being equal you find that the energy imparted upon the water that is sped up from rest to a velocity that is 4 times that from the first case yields the square of that factor. In which case it is 4^2 which is 16 times.

According to this comment, since the pipe used by GSVIT has a diameter half that used by Mizuno, its section is 4 times smaller, and the speed of water at the output 4 times higher; since the kinetic energy depends on the square of the velocity, the kinetic energy associated with water at the output (that is transformed into heat by friction) is 16 times higher, the exact relationship between the two measurements (4.3W against 0.25W).

The commentator also ended by thanking the Mathematics that in his view had solved the problem and congratulated Jed.

…I love it when the math holds up so well.
Congratulations Jed, you got it right.

Unfortunately we have to disenchant him. His reasoning is typical of a person who has scientific knowledge but, almost certainly due to a lack of experience in the field, has analyzed the problem only at it surface. We hope that these notes and the further test that we have added can convince him (and those who make use of his approach) that the reality may seem simple, but almost always the simplest systems, if not observed with the necessary depth, can deceive and lead to erroneous conclusions.

First of all let’s be clear that he would have to be aware of his error by the following simple calculation based on the very few data provided by the pump manufacturer and already published in our previous post:

  • maximum pump flow = 8 litres / min
  • maximum pump head = 1 meter H2O

Obviously the head decreases with increasing flow rate, and the maximum flow is measured at 0 head, as per original data sheet.

We considered, however, applying more conservative constrains, to have simultaneously the maximum flow rate and the maximum head.

The power transferred to the water under these conditions is [by standard theory]:

P = q * ρ * g * h

where:

  • q è la flow capacity = [(8 x 10^-3) /60] m3/s
  • ρ è la density of water @20°C = 998 kg/m3
  • g è la standard acceleration gravity = 9.81 m/s2
  • h è la differential head = 1 m

so that P = [(8 x 10^-3) /60] x 998 x 9.81 x 1 = 1.3W

from this calculation it is clear, however, that this is not the right way to explain a 4W difference.

If we calculate the kinetic energy associated with the water jet exiting the discharge the pump [as done by Roberson], assuming as he does that the flow rate remains the same when passing from 5mm to 10mm [that is wrong], we can write:

  1. water speed @10mm = (8 x 10^-3/60)/[(5 x 10^-3)^2 x π] = 1.7 m/s
  2. water speed @ 5mm = (8 x 10^-3/60)/[(2.5 x 10^-3)^2 x π] = 6.8 m/s
  3. power in the first case = ½ x (8 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (1.7)^2 = 0.19W
  4. power in the second case = ½ x (8 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (6.8)^2 = 3.07W

Note that this power (ref. 4) is still significantly lower than the measured 4.3W, but it is certainly much higher than the actual value since we considered that the pump could simultaneously provide the maximum flow (8 liters / h) and the maximum head (1 m). The output speed calculated in the case of the 5mm pipe is in fact too high (6.8 m/s !) and corresponds (with a 100% nozzle efficiency) to 2.3 meters head, whereas the pump actually has a maximum head of 1 meter.

For verification, as shown in Figure I, we connected again 5mm pipe to the pump to measure the actual output speed of the water.

Figure I - Pump with a 5mm pipe output

Figure I – Pump with a 5mm pipe output

Figure II shows that the jet has a length of 28cm and the height difference between the nozzle and the surface of the water, where the jet is falling, is 10cm.

Figure II - Jet Pump 28cm and 10cm height difference

Figure II – Jet Pump 28cm and 10cm height difference

From Physics, using classical formulas for uniformly accelerated motion, we can write:

(a) for the vertical motion: s = ½ x g x (t^2 )

0.1 = ½ x 9.81 x t^2 which immediately provides: t = 0.143 seconds

(b) for the horizontal motion: s = v x t

0.28 = v x 0.143 from which it is immediately obtained: v = 1.96 m/s

The flow rate is: Q = π x ((2.5 x 10^-3)^2) x 1.96 = 3.85 x 10^-5 m3/s, and then only 2.31 l/min

The power associated with the kinetic energy is then: P = ½ x (2.31 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (1.96^2) = 0.074W

The resulting power is very small and is lower than that calculated for the 10 mm pipe because in that case as well a 8 l / min flow rate was considered, while the 40cm long 5mm pipe used in this measurement (the same we used in our original test) set the pump working point very close to the working point in the Mizuno system (which adopted a 10mm pipe, but 16 meters long), as it was our intention.

The power associated with the real flow, in the Mizuno’s system, was about:

P = ½ x (2.3 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (0.49)^2 = 0.0046W.

It is thus demonstrated that the difference in power measured by us (4.3W) and that indicated by Rothwell (0.25W) is not caused by the pipe diameter.

These simple calculations would be sufficient to set the matter, but here we want to take the opportunity to clarify what we wrote privately to Rothwell about the matter: actually the pipe diameter has no influence on power transferred from the pump to the water, being in reality this power equal to the flow rate times the load loss (head) in the working point of the pump. As explained in the description of the previous test, the pipe diameter has been calculated in order to have a load loss (approximately) equal to that of the Mizuno’s system. Had we adopted a pipe of the same diameter as that used by Mizuno, but shorter, the working point of the pump would have been moved to higher flow and lower head, with the result of increasing (albeit slightly) the power transferred to water. On the other hand, it was impractical to use a 10mm pipe 16 meters long, because the heat loss to the environment would have been excessive thus affecting the measurement.

Figure 1 shows typical curves of a centrifugal pump.

Figure 1 - Typical curves of a centrifugal pump

Figure 1 – Typical curves of a centrifugal pump

As one can see the power consumption (heat transferred to the fluid) grows with decreasing head and is maximum at zero head. Therefore, the decision to adopt that very diameter was taken to avoid measuring a power greater than the real one. A proof of this assertion was obtained when running again the calorimetry test on the pump, increasing the diameter to 10mm, as shown in the following.

Test using a 10mm diameter pipe

Since it is not a test of special importance (it has only demonstration purposes as a response to some comments ) no insulation was applied. This fact, combined with the pipe larger surface area, explains why the delta temperature versus time characteristics is inclined more than in the previous test when the water temperature exceeds the room temperature substantially. However, in this case as well, the measured curve can be approximated by a straight line if the water temperature is kept close to the ambient one (a few °C): So the evaluation was performed in the range 18.1 °C – 23.0 °C, with 20.0 °C in the environment.

Figure 2 shows the new set-up, virtually identical to the previous one, save the paper box that supports the pump.

Figure 2 - Set-up

Figure 2 – Set-up

Figure 3 shows the temperature versus time during the test.

Figure 3 - Plot temperature / time during the test

Figure 3 – Plot temperature / time during the test

Figure 4 shows the system at the beginning of the period considered in the dissipated power calculation.

Figure 4 - T1 temperature

Figure 4 – T1 temperature

In Figure 5 one can see the system at the end of the period taken into account in the calculation of the dissipated power.

Figure 5 - T2 temperature

Figure 5 – T2 temperature

 

The power P transferred from the pump is:
P = 4183 x 0.800 x (T2T1) /t

where:

  • 4183 the water specific heat @ 20°C [J/kg°C]
  • 0.800 the water mass to be heated [kg]
  • T2 is the final temperature [°C]
  • T1 is the initial temperature [C°]
  • t is the time between the two measurements [s]

Considering the values ​​taken from the two photographs (Figure 4 and Figure 5) performed at 1.9 ° C below (T1) and 2.9 ° C above (T2) the ambient temperature and taken respectively at 8:43:31 and at 09:42:34, that is, 3543 seconds away, we have that the power transferred from the pump to the water is equal to 4.6W.

As can be seen the power is slightly higher than that measured in the first test.

In Figure 6 the motor temperature is visible (measured by a pyrometer): it is slightly higher than that of the first test;

Figure 6 – Motor temperature measured by the pyrometer

Figure 6 – Motor temperature measured by the pyrometer

this is normal, being the delivered power slightly greater; however, it is also possible that at least part of the difference is due to a slightly higher supply voltage or reading at a warmer point.

We therefore confirm our measurement of the heat transferred to the water from the pump.

As Jed Rothwell continues to maintain that our value is impossible, we invite him to run again (he himself or together with Mizuno) measurement according to our procedure, since, as we have shown, the test takes no more than 2-3 hours and to publish photos and diagrams as we did.

At this point we must ask ourselves how it is possible that the pump delivers more than 4W to the water, if the theoretical mechanical work exerted by the pump on the water, as we have seen, is 20 times smaller.

One explanation is that these small magnetic drive centrifugal pumps have a very low efficiency, rarely exceeding 0.3.

But this would explain a dissipated power in the order of 1 – 2W, but does not appear sufficient to explain 4.6W.

The explanation (that we already communicated in private to Rothwell) is that a not negligible amount of heat flows by conduction from the motor (which, as seen in Figure 6 is at 45 ° C) to the water through the wall of the magnetic coupling.

For clarity in Figure 7 and 8 one can see the disassembled pump.

Figure 7 - Disassembled pump and magnetic driver temperature magnetico

Figure 7 – Disassembled pump and magnetic driver temperature

Figure 8 - Disassembled pump

Figure 8 – Disassembled pump

As it is clearly seen the water surrounding the magnet is in direct contact with the thin plastic wall that, externally, is in contact with the magnetic driver, whose temperature, after disassembly, at the end of the test was still 42.5 °C, as shown in Fig 7.

These photos contradict what Rothwell states, that these pumps are constructed so as to prevent any flow of heat from the motor to the fluid.

Equipment used:
Iso-Tech IDM91E Tester
Hanna Hi935005 Thermometer
RS 1319A Thermometer
Fluke 80T-IR IR Meter
8A Variac
850cc Dewar vessel
Radio Controlled Clock
Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Contrassegnato | Lascia un commento

Ulteriori misure sulla Pompa MD-6K-N utilizzata da Tadahiko Mizuno

Stesura del Report in data: 10/01/2015
Pubblicazione: 10/01/2015
Traduzione: 12/01/2015

Avendo recentemente letto un commento (postato nel mail-archive vortex-l e scritto da David Roberson) alla nostra recente misura calorimetrica su pompa a trascinamento magnetico Iwaki MD6, commento che tentava di spiegare la grossa differenza esistente tra la potenza ceduta all’acqua durante il nostro test (4.3W) e quella stimata da Jed Rothwell (0.25W), abbiamo ritenuto opportuno rispondere con questo Post anziché limitarci a una semplice risposta nei commenti, nella speranza che fare chiarezza su queste misure possa essere d’aiuto a chi, con onestà intellettuale cerca di affrontare queste problematiche.

Colui che ha scritto il commento individuava una sua spiegazione nella differenza di diametro del tubo di mandata della pompa utilizzato nel nostro test (5mm) rispetto a quello utilizzato da Mizuno (10mm).

In particolare il commentatore scrive:

…Now our favorite skeptic claims that he is using .5 cm pipe instead of the 1 cm pipe used by Mizuno and does not realize that he is making a major error. But, the area of that pipe is reduced by a factor of 4 since it is exactly 1/2 the inner diameter of the original. With a factor of 4 reduction in area comes an increase in the velocity of the water flowing through it by that factor 4 in order to achieve the same mass flow rate. Every thing else being equal you find that the energy imparted upon the water that is sped up from rest to a velocity that is 4 times that from the first case yields the square of that factor. In which case it is 4^2 which is 16 times.

cioè secondo questo commento, essendo il tubo utilizzato da GSVIT un diametro metà di quello utilizzato da Mizuno, la sua sezione era 4 volte inferiore, per cui la velocità dell’acqua in uscita era 4 volte superiore e dal momento che l’energia cinetica dipende dal quadrato della velocità, l’energia cinetica associata all’acqua in uscita (che per attrito si trasforma in calore) è 16 volte superiore, esattamente il rapporto tra le due misurazioni (4.3W contro 0.25W).

Il commentatore inoltre terminava ringraziando la Matematica che a suo avviso aveva risolto il problema e si congratulava con Jed.

…I love it when the math holds up so well.
Congratulations Jed, you got it right.

Purtroppo dobbiamo disilluderlo. Il suo ragionamento è quello tipico di chi ha delle conoscenze scientifiche ma, quasi certamente per mancanza di esperienza nel campo, analizza i problemi in superficie. Speriamo che queste righe ed il test che abbiamo aggiunto possano convincere lui (e chi fa uso del suo approccio) che la realtà può apparire semplice, ma quasi sempre anche il più semplice dei sistemi, se non osservato con la dovuta profondità, può ingannare e portare a conclusioni  errate.

Prima di tutto chiariamo che egli si sarebbe dovuto accorgere del proprio errore dal seguente semplice calcolo basato su pochissimi dati forniti dal costruttore della pompa e già in suo possesso perché pubblicati nel nostro precedente post:

  • portata massima pompa = 8 litri/min
  • prevalenza massima pompa = 1 metro H2O

Ovviamente la prevalenza diminuisce all’aumentare della portata, e la portata massima è misurata a prevalenza nulla, cioè a bocca aperta.

Noi però, applicando le condizioni più conservative, consideriamo pure di avere contemporaneamente la massima portata e la massima prevalenza contemporaneamente.

La potenza ceduta all’acqua in queste condizioni varrebbe:

P = q * ρ * g * h

dove:

  • q è la flow capacity = [(8 x 10^-3) /60] m3/s
  • ρ è la density of water @20°C = 998 kg/m3
  • g è la standard acceleration gravity = 9.81 m/s2
  • h è la differential head = 1 m

da cui P = [(8 x 10^-3) /60] x 998 x 9.81 x 1 = 1.3W

da questo calcolo già si deduce che non è questa la via per spiegare una differenza di 4W.

Volendo eseguire il calcolo delle energie cinetiche associate al getto d’acqua in uscita dal tubo di mandata della pompa come effettuato dal nostro commentatore, supponendo come egli fa che la portata rimanga la stessa nel caso del tubo da 5mm e in quello da 10mm possiamo scrivere:

  1. velocità acqua in tubo da 10mm = (8 x 10^-3/60)/[(5 x 10^-3)^2 x π] = 1.7 m/s
  2. velocità acqua in tubo da 5mm = (8 x 10^-3/60)/[(2.5 x 10^-3)^2 x π] = 6.8 m/s
  3. potenza associata al primo getto = ½ x (8 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (1.7)^2 = 0.19W
  4. potenza associata al secondo getto = ½ x (8 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (6.8)^2 = 3.07W

Si noti che questa potenza (rif. 4.) risulta comunque nettamente inferiore ai 4.3W misurati, ma è certamente molto superiore al valore reale visto che si è considerato che la pompa centrifuga potesse erogare contemporaneamente la massima portata (8 litri /h) e la massima prevalenza (1 m). La velocità di uscita calcolata nel caso del tubo da 5mm risulta infatti spropositata (ben 6.8 m/s) e corrispondente (con rendimento 1 dell’ugello) ad una prevalenza di 2.3 metri, mentre la pompa in realtà ha una prevalenza massima di 1 metro.

Per verifica, come si vede nella Figura I, abbiamo riposizionato la pompa con il tubo di mandata da 5mm in modo da verificare l’effettiva velocità di uscita dell’acqua.

Figura I - Pompa posizionata con tubo di mandata da 5mm

Figura I – Pompa posizionata con tubo di mandata da 5mm

Dalla Figura II è possibile constatare che il getto ha una lunghezza di 28cm e il dislivello tra l’ugello e il pelo dell’acqua, ove cadeva il getto, è di 10cm.

Figura II - Getto della Pompa 28cm e dislivello 10cm

Figura II – Getto della Pompa 28cm e dislivello 10cm

Dalla Fisica, utilizzando le note e classiche formule relative al moto uniformemente accelerato, possiamo scrivere:

(a) per il moto in verticale: s = ½ x g x (t^2 )

0.1 = ½ x 9.81 x t^2 da cui è immediato ricavare: t = 0.143 secondi

(b) per il moto in orizzontale: s = v x t

0.28 = v x 0.143 da cui è immediato ricavare: v = 1.96 m/s

e la portata associata vale: Q = π x ((2.5 x 10^-3)^2) x 1.96 = 3.85 x 10^-5 m3/s, quindi solo 2.31 l/min

La potenza associata al getto vale quindi: P = ½ x (2.31 x 10^-3/60) x 1000 x (1.96^2) = 0.074W

La potenza risultante è molto piccola ed è inferiore a quella calcolata per il tubo da 10mm perché anche in quel caso si è considerato che la portata fosse di 8 l/min, mentre i 40cm di tubo da 5mm utilizzati in questa misura (uguali a quelli utilizzati nella nostra prova calorimetrica della pompa) hanno posizionato il punto di lavoro della pompa (circa) nel punto presente nel sistema di Mizuno (che adottava un tubo da 10mm, ma lungo 16 metri), così come era nostra intenzione.

La potenza associata al getto reale, presente nel sistema Mizuno, quindi era circa:

P = ½ x (2.3 x 10^-3/60)x 1000 x (0.49)^2 = 0.0046W.

E’ quindi dimostrato che la differenza di potenza misurata nella nostra misura calorimetrica sulla pompa (4.3W) e quella indicata da Rothwell (0.25W) non è causata dal diametro del tubo.

Questi semplici calcoli sarebbero sufficienti per capire la questione, però vogliamo qui cogliere l’occasione per chiarire quanto avevamo già scritto privatamente a Jed Rothwell su questo argomento, e cioè che in realtà il diametro del tubo di mandata non ha di per sé alcuna influenza sulla potenza ceduta dalla pompa all’acqua, essendo in realtà la potenza ceduta meccanicamente all’acqua pari al prodotto della portata per il valore della perdita di carico nel punto di lavoro della pompa. Come spiegato nella descrizione della precedente prova calorimetrica della pompa, il diametro del tubo di mandata è stato calcolato proprio per avere una perdita di carico (circa) pari a quella del circuito del sistema Mizuno. Se avessimo adottato un tubo dello stesso diametro di quello utilizzato da Mizuno, ma più corto, il punto di lavoro della pompa si sarebbe posizionato a una portata superiore e a una prevalenza inferiore, col risultato di aumentare (seppure di poco) la potenza ceduta all’acqua. D’altra parte non era nemmeno possibile utilizzare un tubo da 10mm di diametro e 16 metri di lunghezza, perché lo scambio termico verso l’ambiente sarebbe stato eccessivo e la misura falsata.

In Figura 1 è possibile vedere le curve tipiche di una pompa centrifuga.

Figura 1 - Curve tipiche di una pompa centrifuga

Figura 1 – Curve tipiche di una pompa centrifuga

Come si vede la potenza assorbita (e quindi ceduta al fluido) cresce al diminuire della pressione di mandata ed è massima a bocca libera. La scelta quindi di adottare quel diametro è stata dettata dalla volontà di evitare di misurare una potenza superiore a quella reale. A dimostrazione di questa affermazione è stato rieseguito il test calorimetrico sulla pompa, identico al precedente, ma con tutti i tubi da 10mm di diametro.

Verifica utilizzando un tubo da 10mm di diametro

Non trattandosi di un test di particolare importanza (ha solo uno scopo dimostrativo come risposta ad alcuni commenti) non è stata applicata alcuna coibentazione. Questo fatto, unito alla maggiore superficie di scambio dei tubi, spiega perché la relazione delta temperatura/tempo si inclini più del test precedente quando la temperatura dell’acqua supera in modo consistente la temperatura ambiente. In ogni caso anche in questo caso la curva approssima molto bene una retta se non ci si scosta più di un paio di °C da essa, per cui il calcolo è stato eseguito nel campo 18.1°C – 23.0°C, essendo la temperatura ambiente 20.0°C.

In Figura 2 è visibile il nuovo set-up, praticamente identico al precedente.

Figura 2 - Set-up

Figura 2 – Set-up

In Figura 3 è visibile la curva temperatura /tempo durante il test.

Figura 3 - Grafico curva temperatura /tempo durante il test

Figura 3 – Grafico curva temperatura /tempo durante il test

In Figura 4 è visibile il sistema all’inizio del periodo preso in considerazione nel calcolo della potenza ceduta.

Figura 4 - Temperatura T1 del test

Figura 4 – Temperatura T1 del test

In Figura 5 è visibile il sistema alla fine del periodo preso in considerazione nel calcolo della potenza ceduta.

Figura 5 - Temperatura T2

Figura 5 – Temperatura T2

 

La potenza P ceduta dalla pompa è:
P = 4183 x 0.800 x (T2T1) /t

dove:

  • 4183 il calore specifico dell’acqua @ 20°C [J/kg°C]
  • 0.800 la massa di acqua in riscaldamento [kg]
  • T2 la temperatura finale [°C]
  • T1 la temperatura iniziale [C°]
  • t il tempo tra le due misurazioni [s]

Considerando i valori tratti dalle due fotografie (Figura 4 e Figura 5) effettuate a 1.9°C sotto (la T1) e 2.9°C sopra (la T2) rispetto alla temperatura ambiente e scattate rispettivamente alle ore 08:43:31 e alle ore 09:42:34, cioè a 3543 secondi di distanza, si ha che la potenza ceduta dalla Pompa all’acqua è pari a 4.6W.

Come si vede la potenza è risultata leggermente superiore a quella misurata nel primo test.

In Figura 6 è visibile la misura mediante pirometro della temperatura del motore, che è risultata leggermente superiore a quella del primo test:

Figura 6 - misura mediante pirometro della temperatura del motore

Figura 6 – misura mediante pirometro della temperatura del motore

ciò è normale essendo leggermente superiore la potenza erogata, ma è possibile che almeno in parte la differenza sia dovuta a tensione di alimentazione leggermente superiore o a lettura in un punto leggermente più caldo.

Confermiamo quindi la nostra misura della potenza termica ceduta all’acqua dalla pompa.

Poiché Jed Rothwell continua a sostenere che il nostro valore è impossibile, lo invitiamo nuovamente a eseguire lui stesso (o a far eseguire a Mizuno) la misura da noi effettuata, dato che, come abbiamo mostrato, il test non richiede più di 2-3 ore e a pubblicare foto e diagrammi come abbiamo fatto noi.

A questo punto è doveroso chiedersi come sia possibile che la pompa immetta più di 4W nell’acqua, se il lavoro meccanico esercitato dalla pompa sull’acqua, come abbiamo visto, è 20 volte inferiore.

Una prima spiegazione viene dal fatto che queste piccole pompe centrifughe a trascinamento magnetico hanno un rendimento molto basso, raramente superiore a 0.3.

Questo però spiegherebbe una potenza ceduta dell’ordine di 1 – 2W, ma non appare una spiegazione sufficiente per spiegare 4.6W.

La spiegazione (che avevamo già comunicato in privato a Rothwell) è che una quantità non trascurabile di calore fluisce per conduzione dal motore (che come si vede in Figura 6 è a una temperatura dell’ordine di 45°C) all’acqua attraverso la parete dell’accoppiamento magnetico.

Per chiarezza in Figura 7 e 8 è possibile vedere la pompa smontata.

Figura 7 - Pompa smontata e temperatura del trascinatore magnetico

Figura 7 – Pompa smontata e temperatura del trascinatore magnetico

Figura 8 - Pompa smontata

Figura 8 – Pompa smontata

Come si vede chiaramente l’acqua che circonda il magnete si trova a diretto contatto con la sottile parete plastica che all’esterno è in contatto col trascinatore magnetico, la cui temperatura dopo lo smontaggio a fine test era ancora a 42.5°C come mostrato in fig 7.

Queste foto smentiscono quanto Rothwell affermava, cioè che queste pompe sono costruite in modo da impedire ogni flusso di calore dal motore al fluido.

Strumentazione utilizzata:
Tester Iso-Tech IDM91E
Termometro Hanna Hi935005
Termometro RS 1319A
Misuratore IR Fluke 80T-IR
Variac 8A
Thermos a vaso Dewar da 850cc
Orologio radiocontrollato
Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Lascia un commento

Calorimetry measurement on the MD-6K-N pump used by Tadahiko Mizuno

First issue: 24/12/2014
Pubblication: 05/01/2015
Translation: 07/01/2015

This article reports the verification activities and the calorimetry measurement performed on the pump used by Tadahiko Mizuno during his recent measurement of the alleged anomalous heat due to LENR, which was discussed in our previous published analysis; according to our opinion and measurements the origin of the so-called anomalous heat, claimed by Mizuno and Jed Rothwell as due to a LENR phenomenon, is instead simply due to clear errors in measurement and evaluation of the involved parameters.

We have to remember that the Mizuno experimental set-up was checked and confirmed by Jed Rothwell who published his findings in this Report where he testifies that the pump used was:

Figure 1 - Pump used by Mizuno after Rothwell report

Figure 1 – Pump used by Mizuno after Rothwell report

In his report Rothwell says that the power dissipated by the pump was less than 0.5W, probably 0.25W, but certainly less than 1W.

In order to demonstrate which are the real and actual values, we got exactly the same model of pump used by Mizumo and Rothwell:

Figure 2 - Iwaki MD-6K-N pump

Figure 2 – Iwaki MD-6K-N pump

We performed a calorimetry measurement in order to evaluate the actual heat released by the pump. We used exactly the same adiabatic calorimetry method (the one originally used on the cell by Mizuno and Rothwell) confirming that this type of Calorimetry, if well done, allows precise and reliable measurements to be obtained.
Our calorimetry measurement showed that the pump dissipates 4.3W into the water, in line with what expected from our previous analysis of the theoretical data in the report by Rothwell.
It is then confirmed that in the Mizuno reactor, originally presented at the ICCF-18 conference, and measured via different calorimetry methods during 2013 and 2014 with the collaboration of Jed Rothwell, the excess heat claimed and attributed to LENR is instead due to the water pump dissipation in association with strong fluctuations in ambient temperature between day and night.

Measurement method description
The method used to measure the heat transferred from the pump to the water is extremely simple and did not require more than an afternoon of work. The same method had been previously suggested to Rothwell who refused to ask Mizuno to run it.
In Figure 3 one can see the simple set-up:

Figure 3 - Set-up

Figure 3 – Set-up

The pump makes water pass through a Dewar vessel by means of an external hydraulic circuit. The total amount of water was 800g and the heat capacity of the container was neglected. Although not essential, to increase the accuracy we used as external pipe a silicon tube with a 5mm inner diameter, and 40cm long in order to make the pump operate on the same working point in the PQ diagram.
In fact, as we know, for a given flow rate the pressure drop in a pipe depends, as a first approximation, on the inverse of the diameter raised to the 5th power. Since the Mizuno cell used a 16 meters long pipe with a 10mm inner diameter, we could obtain the same pressure drop by using about 0.5m of 5mm pipe. In the actual test, due to height problems the length was reduced to 0.4m.

Since the pump, built for the Japanese market, required a 100V 50Hz power feeding, we used a Variac, monitoring its output by means of a voltage tester. A preliminary simple test was performed to check if the Dewar vessel heat loss was really negligible. So we put inside 800g water at about 30 ° C, waiting about one hour to have the temperature stabilized; then the water temperature decrease was recorded during a 45 minute period.

The details are as follows:

  • Initial temperature: 28.0 ° C
  • Final temperature: 27.1 ° C
  • Room temperature: 21.0 ° C

These data provide a heat exchange coefficient K: = 0.15W/°C that is more than acceptable for the test, as long as operation is kept at temperatures not very far from the room temperature.
Before the test, the pump was preheated for about an hour in order to evaluate the water flow (see Figure 4).

Figure 4 - Pump preheating phase

Figure 4 – Pump preheating phase

 

Then a simple set-up was prepared with continuous reading of water and ambient air temperatures by two different thermometers.
The hydraulic circuit was then loaded with 800g of water at 14 ° C, and the pump was started [it is not self-priming] (see Figure 5).

Figure 5 – Beginning of test

Figure 5 – Beginning of test

We had to wait about an hour to have the water temperature ​​close to room temperature; then data were collected through successive photographs. Figure 6 and Figure 7 show the values ​​used in the final calculation.

Figure 6 - T1 Temperature

Figure 6 – T1 Temperature

Figure 7 - T2 Temperature

Figure 7 – T2 Temperature

At the end of the test the two thermometers showed the same values (see Figure 8).

Figure 8 - Control thermometers at the end of the test

Figure 8 – Control thermometers at the end of the test

 

At the end of the test the two thermometers showed the same values (see FiguThe pump motor temperature was measured as well; it was found to be 45 ° C (see Figure 9).

Figure 9 – Pump motor temperature

Figure 9 – Pump motor temperature

Figure 10 shows the time evolution of measured temperatures.

Figure 10 - Measurement diagram

Figure 10 – Measurement diagram

The power P transferred from the pump is given by:
P = 4183 x 0.800 x (T2T1) /t

where:

  • 4183 is the specific heat of water @ 20°C [J/kg°C]
  • 0.800 the mass of water to be heated [kg]
  • T2 is the final temperature [°C]
  • T1 is the initial temperature [C°]
  • t is the time interval between the two measurements [s]

Considering the values obtained from the two photographs (Figure 6 and Figure 7) taken at 0.5 ° C below (T1) and 1.0 ° C above (T2) the ambient temperature and taken respectively at 15:51:45 pm and 16:12:24, [that is at an interval of 20 minutes and 39 seconds], one can calculate that the power transferred from the pump to the water is equal to 4.3W, i.e. 0.4W higher than what we estimated theoretically in our previous Post. The difference is due to the conservative choices adopted there.

Conclusions
Calorimetry measurement performed on the same pump model used by Tadahiko Mizuno has confirmed that the pump dissipation is an order of magnitude higher than that assumed by Jed Rothwell: as such it can explain exactly the apparent excess heat measured.

 
Equipment used:
Iso-Tech IDM91E Tester
Hanna Hi935005 Thermometer
RS 1319A Thermometer
Fluke 80T-IR IR Meter
8A Variac
850cc Dewar vessel
Radio Controlled Clock
Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Contrassegnato | 9 commenti

Misura calorimetrica sulla Pompa MD-6K-N utilizzata da Tadahiko Mizuno

Stesura del Report in data: 24/12/2014
Pubblicazione: 05/01/2015
Traduzione: 07/01/2015

English version available at this link.

Questo articolo riassume l’attività di verifica e la misura calorimetrica condotta sulla Pompa utilizzata da Tadahiko Mizuno durante la sua recente misura di presunto calore anomalo dovuto a fenomeni LENR, di cui si era discusso nella nostra precedente analisi pubblicata, in quanto a nostro avviso l’origine del cosidetto calore anomalo, rivendicato da Mizuno e Jed Rothwell come fosse dovuto a fenomeno LENR, è invece semplicemente dovuto a loro evidenti errori di misura e di valutazione dei parametri.

Ricordiamo inoltre che il set-up sperimentale di Mizuno era stato verificato e confermato da Jed Rothwell che ha pubblicato i suoi risultati in questo Report e che Rothwell, nel suo Report, testimonia che la Pompa utilizzata era:

Figura 1 - Pompa utilizzata da Mizuno secondo Rothwell

Figura 1 – Pompa utilizzata da Mizuno secondo Rothwell

Nel suo Report Rothwell afferma che la potenza dissipata dalla pompa era minore di 0.5W, probabilmente 0.25W, ma con certezza minore di 1W.

Al fine di dimostrare quale sia la realtà e gli effettivi valori in gioco, ci siamo procurati esattamente il medesimo modello di Pompa utilizzata da Mizumo e Rothwell:

Figura 2 - Pompa Iwaki MD-6K-N

Figura 2 – Pompa Iwaki MD-6K-N

ed eseguita la Calorimetria per valutare l’effettivo calore rilasciato dalla Pompa. Il metodo utilizzato è proprio una Calorimetria adiabatica come quella che Rothwell pensava di utilizzare sulla cella Mizuno, a conferma che tale tipo di Calorimetria, se ben condotto, permette misure precise e affidabili.
La nostra misura calorimetrica ha evidenziato che la Pompa dissipa nell’acqua 4.3W, in linea con quanto avevamo previsto dalla nostra analisi teorica dei dati riportati dallo stesso Rothwell.
E’ quindi confermato che nel reattore Mizuno, presentato al ICCF-18 e sottoposto a diverse misure calorimetriche nel corso del 2013 e 2014 con la collaborazione di Jed Rothwell, l’eccesso di calore dichiarato e attribuito a fenomeni LENR era invece dovuto alla Pompa di circolazione dell’acqua in associazione alle forti fluttuazioni della temperatura ambientale fra il giorno e la notte.

Metodo di misura utilizzato
Il metodo utilizzato per la misura della potenza termica ceduta dalla pompa all’acqua è estremamente semplice e non ha richiesto più di un pomeriggio di lavoro. Lo stesso metodo era stato da noi suggerito a Rothwell che si era rifiutato di chiedere a Mizuno di eseguirlo.
In Figura 3 è possibile vedere il semplice Set-up:

Figura 3 - Set-up

Figura 3 – Set-up

La Pompa aspira l’acqua dall’interno di un comune Thermos e ve la reimette. La quantità di acqua introdotta era di 800g e la capacità termica del contenitore è stata trascurata. Seppure non di fondamentale importanza, per maggior precisione si è utilizzato per il tubo di mandata un tubo in silicone del diametro interno di 5mm, lungo 40cm allo scopo di far operare la pompa sullo stesso punto di lavoro nel diagramma P-Q.
Infatti come si sa le perdite di carico in una tubazione, a parità di portata dipendono, in prima approssimazione, dall’inverso del diametro elevato alla 5° potenza. Dal momento che nella cella Mizuno erano utilizzati 16 metri di tubo di diametro interno 10mm, la stessa perdita di carico può essere ottenuta utilizzando circa 0.5m di tubo da 5mm. Nel test effettivo, per problemi di altezze tale lunghezza è stata ridotta a 0.4m.

Poiché la pompa, utilizzata sul mercato giapponese, richiedeva l’alimentazione a 100V 50Hz, è stato utilizzato un Variac la cui uscita è stata monitorata mediante un Tester.
Si è prima effettuato un semplice test sul Thermos per verificare se la sua dispersione termica fosse sufficientemente piccola da poter essere trascurata. Si sono immessi nel Thermos 800g di acqua a circa 30°C, si è atteso circa un’ora per dare tempo alle temperature di stabilizzarsi, poi si è controllata la diminuzione di temperatura dell’acqua in un periodo pari a 45 minuti.

I dati sono i seguenti:

  • Temp. Iniziale: 28.0°C
  • Temp. Finale: 27.1°C
  • Temp. Ambiente 21.0°C

Da questi dati si ricava un coefficiente di scambio termico K = 0.15 W/°C che è più che accettabile per il test, purchè si operi a temperature non molto lontane dalla temperatura ambiente.

Prima del test la Pompa è stata preriscaldata per circa un’ora in modo da valutare il flusso dell’acqua (vedere Figura 4).

Figura 4 - Fase di preriscaldo

Figura 4 – Fase di preriscaldo della Pompa

 

Si è quindi approntato il semplice Set-up che prevedeva la lettura continua della temperatura dell’acqua e dell’aria ambiente mediante due termometri.
Il circuito è stato quindi caricato con 800g di acqua a 14°C, caricata e avviata la Pompa che non è autoadescante (vedere Figura 5).

Figura 5 -  Inizio test

Figura 5 – Inizio test

Si è atteso circa un’ora che la temperatura dell’acqua lentamente salisse a valori vicino alla temperatura ambiente, poi si sono raccolti i dati mediante fotografie successive. In Figura 6 e Figura 7 sono riportati i valori utilizzati nel calcolo finale.

Figura 6 - Temperatura T1

Figura 6 – Temperatura T1

Figura 7 - Temperatura T2

Figura 7 – Temperatura T2

A fine prova si è verificato che l’indicazione dei due termometri coincidesse (vedere Figura 8).

Figura 8 - Controllo termometri a fine test

Figura 8 – Controllo termometri a fine test

 

E’ stata anche misurata la temperatura del motore che è risultata di 45°C (vedere Figura 9).

Figura 9 - Temperatura motore

Figura 9 – Temperatura motore

In Figura 10 è riportato il diagramma delle temperature rilevate.

Figura 10 - Grafico misura

Figura 10 – Grafico misura

La potenza P ceduta dalla pompa è:
P = 4183 x 0.800 x (T2T1) /t

dove:

  • 4183 il calore specifico dell’acqua @ 20°C [J/kg°C]
  • 0.800 la massa di acqua in riscaldamento [kg]
  • T2 la temperatura finale [°C]
  • T1 la temperatura iniziale [C°]
  • t il tempo tra le due misurazioni [s]

Considerando i valori tratti dalle due fotografie (Figura 6 e Figura 7) effettuate a 0.5°C sotto (la T1) e 1.0°C sopra (la T2) rispetto alla temperatura ambiente e scattate rispettivamente alle ore 15:51:45 e alle ore 16:12:24, cioè a 20 minuti e 39 secondi di distanza, si ha che la potenza ceduta dalla Pompa all’acqua è pari a 4.3W, cioè 0.4W in piu’ rispetto a quanto avevamo stimato per via teorica nel nostro Post precedente. La differenza e’ dovuta alle scelte cautelative adottate per il calcolo nel Post precedente.

Conclusioni
La misura calorimetrica effettuata sul modello di Pompa adottata da Tadahiko Mizuno ha confermato che la dissipazione della Pompa è un ordine di grandezza superiore a quella supposta da Jed Rothwell e tale da spiegare esattamente l’apparente eccesso di calore misurato.

Strumentazione utilizzata:
Tester Iso-Tech IDM91E
Termometro Hanna Hi935005
Termometro RS 1319A
Misuratore IR Fluke 80T-IR
Variac 8A
Thermos a vaso Dewar da 850cc
Orologio radiocontrollato

 

Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Lascia un commento

Misure e verifiche con un analizzatore di potenza PCE-830

Stesura del Report in data: 15/12/2014
Pubblicazione: 22/12/2014

LineaSommario del Post:

1.0 Introduzione
2.0 Esempio di applicazione – Misura classica del consumo di un carico Trifase
3.0 Applicazione dello strumento – Misura del consumo di carichi connessi a linee Trifase parzializzate
4.0 La nostra sperimentazione – Misura su linee Trifase parzializzate tramite TRIAC
   4.1 Prove con lo strumento connesso “a monte”
   4.2 Prove con lo strumento connesso “a valle”
   4.3 Prove con lo strumento in condizioni di OverLoad (OL)
5.0 Ulteriori considerazioni
6.0 Conclusioni

Linea

1.0 Introduzione

Il PCE-830 è un analizzatore di potenza ed armoniche, costruito dalla PCE, destinato alla verifica delle reti elettriche di alimentazione e alla determinazione di  consumi energetici. Una breve descrizione dello strumento e dei suoi accessori è disponibile a questo link.

Per chi fosse maggiormente interessato è disponibile il Manuale completo in inglese dello strumento che, oltre alla descrizione delle sue funzioni e caratteristiche, riporta anche dei classici esempi applicativi di set-up di misura. Una versione più ridotta del manuale è scaricabile da qui.

Questo strumento solitamente si utilizza per misure di consumo di energia elettrica, stima della potenza elettrica (Attiva, Reattiva ed Apparente) ed analisi armonica su Tensioni e Correnti di linee Trifase, sia quando sia presente anche la connessione di Neutro [in questo caso si definisce una configurazione di tipo 3P4W (3-Phase Four Wires)], sia quando la connessione del Neutro è assente [in questo caso si definisce una configurazione di tipo 3P3W (3-Phase 3-Wires)].

Quando lo strumento è connesso per eseguire delle misure di tipo 3P3W necessita del collegamento delle 3 Tensioni V1, V2 e V3, dalle quali sono deducubili le 3 Tensioni concatenate V12, v23 e V31, ed ovviamente delle 3 Correnti di Linea I1, I2 e I3 che vengono prelevate dal circuito tramite apposito Current Probe (uno per ogni Linea) ad accoppiamento magnetico la cui portata è scelta e commisurata al valore di corrente che si intende misurare. Un esempio di connessione tipo 3P3W, tratto dal Manuale dello strumento, è riportato in Figura 1.

Figura 1 - Connessione 3P3W

Figura 1 – Connessione 3P3W

 

2.0 Esempio di applicazione – Misura classica del consumo di un carico Trifase

In figura 2 è mostrata la connessione 3P3W di un PCE-830 effettuata in una applicazione reale al fine di misurare il consumo di una apparecchiatura elettrica che viene alimentata da una linea elettrica Trifase. I Current Probe in uso sono il modello PCE-6801 che hanno come portata di f.s. 100 Arms.

Figura 2 - Esempio connessione reale 3P3W

Figura 2 – Esempio connessione reale 3P3W

 

Per quanto riguarda la misura dell’apparecchiatura del nostro esempio, lo strumento mostra, all’interno della schermata principale, un riassunto dati contenente i principali parametri elettrici necessari per stimare il consumo di energia e l’assorbimento di potenza. La schermata principale è visibile in Figura 3.

Figura 3 - Esempio di misura di potenza su carico trifase

Figura 3 – Esempio di misura di potenza su carico trifase

 

I valori delle Tensioni concatenate mostrate sullo schermo V12, V23 e V31 ci indicano che ci troviamo di fronte ad un sistema Trifase 380 Vac nominali (Frequenza di rete di 50 Hz) e che le Correnti di Linea si aggirno intorno ai 5.8 Arms. Specificatamente per quanto riguarda la misurazione di alcuni parametri elettrici, lo strumento stima:

1)  una Potenza Attiva complessiva pari a circa 2.477 kW

2)  una Potenza Reattiva complessiva pari a circa -3.019 kVAR

3)  una Potenza Apparente complessiva pari a circa 3.905 kVA

4) un cos(φ) di valore 0.63

5) una Frequenza di rete di 50Hz

Le Tensioni V1, V2, V3 risultano ovviamente pari a 1/√(3) rispetto alle Tensioni concatenate, il loro valore è prossimo ai 220 Vac nominali. Nella Figura 4 è mostrata la schermata specifica dello strumento che riporta tali valori ed include anche il Diagramma dei Fasori che mostra la relazione di fase tra le varie grandezze elettriche.

Figura 4 - Diagramma dei Fasori

Figura 4 – Diagramma dei Fasori

Nell’esempio riguardante la misura di questa apparecchiatura (un motore Trifase) si può notare che le correnti I1, I2 e I3 risultano in ritardo (di circa 51°)  rispetto alle corrispondenti Tensioni in quanto le relazioni riferite ad un carico a Triangolo regolare resistivo prevedono un ritardo di 30°:

Correnti nel sistema Trifase - Terna equilibrata con carico a Triangolo

Correnti nel sistema Trifase – Terna equilibrata con carico a Triangolo regolare

mentre nel nostro esempio di Figura 4 complessivamentela la I3 risulta 81° in ritardo rispetto alla V31, questo è il motivo per cui il cos(φ) misurato risulta 0.63 invece che unitario.

Si può notare che questo strumento effettua una misura della potenza anche nel caso che uno (o più) dei suoi Current Probe erroneamente sia stato collegato invertito come convenzione del verso della corrente. La Figura 5 mostra l’inversione del Current Probe n.3 (quello di colore blu) e la Figura 6 mostra la schermata dei parametri elettrici rilevati in questa condizione (virtualmente indistinguibile dalla precedente misura di Potenza).

Figura 5 - Connessione 3P3W con Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 5 – Connessione 3P3W con Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 6 - Misura di potenza con Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 6 – Misura di potenza con Current Probe 3 invertito

Specificatamente in questo caso (Current Probe invertito) lo strumento rileva:

1)  una Potenza Attiva complessiva pari a circa 0.788 kW

2)  una Potenza Reattiva complessiva pari a circa -0.935 kVAR

3)  una Potenza Apparente complessiva pari a circa 1.222 kVA

4) ancora un cos(φ) di valore 0.64

5) una Frequenza di rete di 50Hz

E’ da rilevare quindi che in queste condizioni la potenza stimata dallo strumento (p.e. quella Attiva) risulta essere 0.788W/2.477W, cioè circa 1/3 di quella effettivamente consumata dal motore.

Solo osservando il Diagramma dei Fasori l’inversione di uno dei Current Probe appare evidente come mostrato in Figura 7. Lo sfasamento complessivo tra I3 e V31 è in questo caso di 261° a cui corrisponderebbe un  cos(φ) di -0.63.

Figura 7 - Diagramma dei Fasori con Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 7 – Diagramma dei Fasori con Current Probe 3 invertito

La Figura precedente mostra come, al fine di verificare e testimoniare il corretto orientamento dei Current Probe, e più in generale il corretto collegamento dello strumento al sistema Trifase, è necessario controllare e testimoniare le connessioni del PCE-830 attraverso la schermata che riporta il Diagramma dei Fasori. A seguito dell’inversione del Current Probe i valori delle correnti non cambiano e non viene mostrato nessun allarme. Solo quando collegato in modo regolare lo strumento opera realmente una misura corretta delle grandezze.

3.0 Applicazione dello strumento – Misura del consumo di carichi connessi a linee Trifase parzializzate

Questo analizzatore di potenza è stato utilizzato per la stima del consumo elettrico del dispositivo denominato Hot-Cat. Il documento denominato Observation of abundant heat production from a reactor device and of isotopic changes in the fuel (TPR2) a firma dei professori:

G. Levi, E. Foschi, Bo Höistad, R. Pettersson, L. Tegnér e H. Essén

(nel seguito denominati Autori “AA”) viene preso come traccia di riferimento per discutere alcuni aspetti delle misure eseguite con il PCE-830.

Nel TPR2 viene descritto un sistema di 3 Resistenze (che per quanto desumibile dal documento risultano essere di pari valore), tra loro connesse in una configurazione a Δ (carico connesso a Traingolo) alimentate attraverso un sistema di parzializzazione delle tre Tensioni derivanti da una rete Trifase. Dalla descrizione e dalla documentazione fotografica riportata nel documento, il parzializzatore sembrerebbe essere un dispositivo a semiconduttori in grado di realizzare una parzializzazione “di fase” con angoli di conduzione anche stretti, in particolare la Figura 3 del TPR2 riprende come facente parte del set-up utilizzato, un parzializzatore di tipo Phase Angle molto simile al prodotto della Fusion del quale a questo link è disponibile documentazione tecnica. Una tipica applicazione del Fusion quando connesso ad un sistema Trifase, senza Neutro, è mostrata in Figura 8.

Figura 8 - Connessioni FUSION

Figura 8 – Connessioni FUSION

 

In riferimento allo schema riassuntivo riportato nel TPR2, la Figura 9 mostra i collegamenti elettrici realizzati per quel set-up.

Figura 9 - TPR 2 Schema dei collegamenti

Figura 9 – TPR 2 Schema dei collegamenti

Si nota come una linea Trifase 380Vac alimenti un carico resistivo composto da 3 Resistori connessi a Triangolo attaverso un sistema di parzializzazione. Gli strumenti di misura raffigurati sono due, uno primo PCE-830 posto “a monte” (upstream) del Control Sysytem (che include il sistema di parzializzazione delle tensioni tipo Fusion) cioè il PCE [A] e poi un secondo PCE [B] posizionato invece “a valle” (downstream) del Control System.

Lo strumento PCE [A] posto a monte misura la potenza Trifase complessivamente utilizzata, è connesso alle 3 Tensioni di Linea (senza il collegamento di Neutro) e alle 3 Correnti di Linea. Lo strumento PCE [B], posto a valle, misura la potenza assorbita dalle Resistenze essendo connesso alle 3 Tensioni di Linea dopo il sistema di parzializzazione e ovviamente alle medesime 3 Correnti di Linea. In questa configurazione di connessione entrambi gli strumenti devono operare nella modalità di misura denominata 3P3W.

Sempre attraverso la consultazione del documento TPR2 è possibile rilevare quale tipo di Current Probe, molto probabilmente (gli AA non esplicitano), sia stato utilizzato in congiunzione al PCE-830 per le misure. La Figura 10, sulla destra in alto, riporta un dettaglio del set-up del TPR2 ed in alto a sinistra mostra i Current Probe PCE-6801 (tipo quelli da noi utilizzati per le precedenti misure).

Figura 10 - Current Probe PCE-6801

Figura 10 – Current Probe PCE-6801

Quando all’analizzatore PCE-830 si collegano i Currenti Probe tipo PCE-6801, lo strumento assume un Range di misura operativo, per la misura della corrente (nel range 50-60 Hz) che, da specifica costruttore, arriva fino a 100Arms.

Figura 11 - AC Range con Current Probe PCE-6801

Figura 11 – AC Range con Current Probe PCE-6801

Superato questo valore di corrente di 100 Arms si opera al di fuori dalle caratteristiche dicharate del costruttore e non è garantito che lo strumento rispetti le specifiche di misura di cui sopra. Inoltre il Manuale dello strumento fa riferimento ad un altro limite assoluto sulla corrente per il sistema di misura, che è rappresentatala dalla condizione di OverLoad protection AC, una soglia limite di OL  per correnti prossime a 200A.

A questo proposito una prima valutazione operativa può essere fatta prendendo a riferimento i dati riportati in Tabella 7 del TPR2. In quella Tabella sono riassunti i principali dati che riguardano i consumi e le varie potenze misurate e sono anche riportati i valori, calcolati dagli AA, che riguardano la potenza dissipata per effetto Joule dai conduttori che collegano i tre Resistori di carico con il sistema di alimentazione Trifase. In particolare la Tabella 7 riporta nella terz’ultima colonna i valori di potenza, attribuiti dagli AA, al “Joule Heating”.

Tabella 7 del TPR2

Tabella 7 del TPR2

I valori sono stati calcolati dagli AA utilizzando le relazioni (9) e (10) riportate a pagina 14 del documento, cioè:

Relazioni (9) e (10) di pagina 14 del TPR2

Relazioni (9) e (10) di pagina 14 del TPR2

e le correnti considerate sono valori rms dato che si esegue il calcolo della dissipazione dei conduttori. Su queste relazioni torneremo anche in seguito ma per il momento ci limitiamo ad utilizzarle, così come gli AA hanno definito i legami tra le grandezze, rielaborandole unicamente al fine di ricavare, in prima approssimazione, le Correnti rms di Linea che gli AA affermano di aver misurato (senza esplicitarle nel documento) durante il Run. Consideriamo le implicazioni conseguenti a quello che gli AA hanno scritto nelle loro (9) e (10),  e considerando che:

Ptot/3 = (P1 + 2 * P2)

(dove P1 è la potenza dissipata in R1, P2 è la potenza dissipara in R2 e Ptot è la potenza complessiva dissipata per Joule heating)

si possono ricavare i valori della Corrente rms di Linea, a partire dalle quantità riportate come potenza dissipata nella colonna “Joule heating”, utilizzando i valori R1 ed R2 dichiarati nel TPR2. In prima approssimazione la Corrente di Linea vale:

I Linea = √[(Ptot/3)/(R1+R2/2)]

Si ottengono in questo modo i valori delle Correnti di Linea da associare ad ognuno dei File del Run della Tabella 7 e per il test Dummy, e cioè:

Tabella 7 del TPR2 rielaborata

Tabella 7 del TPR2 rielaborata

I valori di Corrente di Linea così calcolati per i File del Run risultano in buon accordo con quanto descritto nel documento, infatti  gli AA riportano che:

The regulator is driven by a potentiometer used to set the operating point (i.e. the current through the resistor coils, normally 40-50 Amps)

inoltre, specificatamente per il test Dummy, gli AA riportano di aver misurato una Corrente di Linea di 19.7 A.

Come detto in precedenza la dinamica di misura va verificata in funzione dei valori di corrente circolante. Considerando che l’alimentazione dei Resistori viene ricavata parzializzando le 3 Tensioni di Linea Trifase, le correnti circolanti non risultano essere grandezze puramente sinusoidali bensì assumono caratteristiche fortemente impulsive per cui bisogna assicurarsi che i valori di Picco della Corrente di Linea rimangano sempre contenuti all’interno della dinamica di misura e della specifica dello strumento compreso il relativo Current Probe utilizzato. A questo scopo assume particolare interesse valutare la Ipeak (oltre che il valore Irms), ma nel documento questo dato non viene riportato.

Sulla base della potenza riportata nel documento per il test Dummy è possibile stimare il valore resistivo Rload di ciascuna delle Resistenze di carico ed il risultato che si ottiene, in prima approssimazione, è di circa 1.24 ohm. E’ immediato verificare che tale valore corrisponde ad una potenza dissipata di:

Ptot = {3 * Rload * [I Linea/√(3)]^2} ≈ 480 W

oppure semplicemente Ptot = {Rload * [I Linea]^2} ≈ 480 W

oppure anche considerando la Req pari a:
[Rload*(Rload+Rload)]/(3*Rload) corrispondente a (2/3 * Rload), avremo che:
Ptot = {3/2 * Req * (I Linea)^2} ≈ 480W

In forza del valore Rload di cui sopra è possibile ricavare il valore della  Tensione rms di Linea e questo valore in prima approssimazione vale 15 Vrms. Il valore Vrms è stato ottenuto attraverso calcolo matematico e verificato utilizzando un simulatore circuitale. Considerando che la tensione di alimentazione della rete è di 380Vac, per produrre il valore di tensione di 15 Vrms l’angolo di conduzione del parzializzatore si dovrebbe aggirare intorno ai . La tensione di Picco associata a quest’angolo vale:

Vpeak = 380 * √(2) * sin(180-9) = 84 Vpeak

di conseguenza la corrente Ipeak sarà:

Vpeak/Req = 101 Apeak

[questo valore, presumibilmente, è ridotto per effetto del coefficiente di auto-induzione dei collegamenti; una stima di questo effetto darebbe come risultato una Corrente di Picco che potrebbe aggirarsi intorno ai 85 Apeak]. Il valore calcolato risulta ancora compatibile con la dinamica di misura del Current Probe e il rapporto Ipeak/Irms (il Fattore di Cresta) risulterebbe circa 5.

Analogamente si può ripetere questa breve analisi per quanto riguarda le prove Hot-Cat in Run. Prendiamo in considerazione, ad esempio, la potenza dichiarata dagli AA relativa al File n.9 pari a 917.9W e la Corrente di Linea conseguente era circa 49A. Ricalcolando in base a questi valori la resistenza Rload si scopre che in questo caso (il Run) la resistenza differisce sensibilmente dal precedente valore stimato dal test in Dummy. Il calcolo porta ad ottenere un valore circa 1/3 del precedente in particolare 0.365 ohm. Per verifica ricalcolando la potenza:

Ptot = {Rload * [I Linea]^2} ≈ 877 W (cioè i 918 W al netto del Joule heating dichiarato nel documento dagli AA corrispondente a 41 W)

Questa notevole variazione del valore della resistenza è stata giustificata dagli AA, per voce del dott. Rossi su JoNP, come caratteristica voluta e dovuta alla composizione del resistore molto particolare (si parla di un conduttore drogato) utilizzato nel Hot-Cat, avente caratteristiche fortemente non lineari ed estremamente dipendenti dalla temperatura. Inoltre, considerando i dati riportati nel TPR2, il salto quasi totale di resistenza avverrebbe unicamente tra i 450°C del test Dummy e i 1250°C del test Run in quanto poi la variazione della resistività si stabilizza intorno ad un valore con una variazione minima di pochi punti %.

Di seguito la comunicazione pubblicata su JoNP.

Rossi su JoNP

Rossi su JoNP

Il nuovo valore resistivo però comporta un ricalcolo e una nuova verifica dei parametri di misura. In forza del valore Rload di cui sopra è possibile ricavare il valore della  Tensione rms di Linea e questo valore in prima approssimazione vale 10.5 Vrms. Considerando che la tensione di alimentazione della rete è di 380Vac, per produrre il valore di tensione di 10 Vrms l’angolo di conduzione del parzializzatore si dovrebbe aggirare intorno ai 7.5°. La tensione di Picco associata a quest’angolo vale:

Vpeak = 380 * √(2) * sin(180-7.5) = 70 Vpeak

di conseguenza la corrente Ipeak conseguente sarà:

Vpeak/Req = 285 Apeak

[questo valore, presumibilmente, è ridotto per effetto del coefficiente di auto-induzione dei collegamenti; una stima di questo effetto darebbe come risultato una Corrente di Picco che potrebbe aggirarsi intorno ai 185 Apeak]. In questo caso quindi il valore calcolato come Corrente di Picco risulta a rischio rispetto alla dinamica di misura del Current Probe e la Corrente di Picco della Linea, in funzione dell’effettivo angolo di conduzione, potrebbe uscire dalla specifica dello strumento e risultare persino superiore ai valori e ai limiti previsti per la condizione di OverLoad (OL).

Se queste erano le condizioni di lavoro, sarebbe interessante capire in dettaglio come gli AA possono aver progettato, ed eseguito, delle misure elettriche corrette.

Riprendendo inoltre quanto è stato scritto dagli AA a pagina 14 del TPR2 e che anche il dott. Rossi su JoNP  si premura di confermare in prima persona, fornendo pure una sua deduzione allo scopo di giustificare i contenuti:

Rossi su JoNP conferma correnti I/2

Rossi su JoNP conferma correnti I/2

 “THE ALIMENTATION CABLING OF THE REACTOR IS COMPOSED BY MEANS OF 2 PARTS FOR EVERY ROW:
1- ONE PART FROM THE CONTROL SYSTEM TO THE JOINT (C); THIS PART IS NAMED C1
2- AFTER THE JOINT C THE SAME CURRENT IS SUBDIVIDED INTO 2 ROWS HAVING THE SAME SECTION AND LENGTH: WE CALL THEM C2
BASED ON THE KIRCHHOFF LAW ( ALSO CALLED KICHHOFF JUNCTION RULE) , WE CAN MAKE THE DEDUCTION THAT THE CURRENT THAT FLOWS THROUGH THE ROW C1 IS EQUAL TO THE DOUBLE OF THE CURRENT THAT FLOWS ALONG EACH OF THE ROWS NAMED C2.

è necessario chiarire che quanto affermato dal dott. Rossi e quanto scritto nella relazione (10) del TPR2 dal puno di vista teorico è completamente errato. La corrente citata è quella che determinerebbe la dissipazione Joule nei conduttori quindi il suo valore Irms, infatti gli AA attraverso di essa si pongono l’obiettivo di calcolare la potenza dissipata a regime applicando la classica relazione P=R*(I^2), nella quale I rappresenta il valore rms della corrente da considerare (per ciascuno dei tre nodi del sistema) intendendo una linea C1 dalla quale poi si diramano i 2 rami C2 (si noti che gli AA nel loro esposizione fanno conto che il carico era composto da 3 resistenze di pari valore).

Quanto sostenuto dal dott. Rossi e dagli AA è sconcertante e smentito dalle stesse leggi dell’Elettrotecnica che invocano a supporto. Risulta sorprendente soprattutto che sia gli AA, sia tutti coloro che hanno effettuato il prolungato ed approfondito peer-review del TPR2, durato oltre 6 mesi, abbiano creduto alla validità delle relazioni utilizzate nel documento per il calcolo delle correnti nei rami C2. Nella condizione descritta dagli AA, la corrente Irms nei singoli rami C2 vale in modulo 1/√(3) del valore della corrente Irms del ramo C1 e non 1/2; questo è notorio dalla teoria delle reti Trifase, comunque di questo si darà anche evidenza sperimentale nel seguito con delle misure condotte allo scopo di mostrare le vere relazioni tra le correnti.

Se il problema fosse puramente dovuto ad “un errore teorico degli AA” esso avrebbe impatto sul calcolo della potenza dissipata dai fili ma avrebbe effetto marginale rispetto ai valori di potenza dissipata nei resistori, però gli AA nel TPR2 sostengono esplicitamente di aver “misurato” sia la corrente in C1 che quella in C2, infatti scrivono:

Measurements performed during the dummy run with the PCE and ammeter clamps allowed us to measure an average current, for each of the three C1 cables, of I1 = 19.7A, and, for each C2 cable, a current of I1 / 2 = I2 = 9.85 A

quindi secondo gli AA la corrente da loro misurata in C2 era la metà di quella da loro misurata in C1. Questa esplicita affermazione, nell’ipotesi di cui sopra, comporterebbe come conseguenza l’evidenza che il circutito elettrico descritto dagli AA nel TPR2 (3 Resistori connessi a Triangolo) non erano stati connessi a Triangolo durante il test. Questa incongruenza è un altro elemento di dubbio che, a nostro avviso, gli AA dovrebbero spiegare fornendo tutte le evidenze documentali oggettive necessarie a supporto delle loro affermazioni.

4.0 La nostra sperimentazione – Misura su linee Trifase parzializzate tramite TRIAC

Ritorniamo ora agli aspetti di misura sperimentati. Allo scopo di verificare in laboratorio (nei limiti del possibile) condizioni di misura dello strumento come quelle descritte nel TPR2, è stato progettato  e realizzato un sistema di parzializzazione Trifase, basato su semiconduttori di tipo TRIAC, la cui commutazione è stata sequenziata similmente a quella prodotta del Fusion. La figura 12 mostra la scheda TRIAC “custom” realizzata e poi utilizzata per i test seguenti.

Figura 12 - Scheda TRIAC

Figura 12 – Scheda TRIAC

 Il nostro set-up di misura include ovviamente un PCE-830 equipaggiato con 3 Current Probe tipo PCE-6801, i 3 carichi resistivi realizzati uilizzando tre comuni Lampade ad incandescenza da 100W nominali ciascuna, un Scopemeter Fluke 123 con banda 20MHz e collegato ad una  Pinza di Corrente della Chauvin Arnoux avente Banda di frequenza operativa fino a 100 kHz con un fattore di scala di 100 mV/A. La figura 13 mostra il set-up allestito.

Figura 13 - Set-up per le misure

Figura 13 – Set-up per le misure

 

Preliminarmente vanno considerati e chiariti due aspetti che riguardano il set-up realizzato.

Il primo riguarda il valore della tensione Trifase utilizzata per le prove che è stata ricavata attraverso un Variac di potenza a partire dalla rete Trifase 400Vac. Per motivi legati alla tensione massima di lavoro dei semiconduttori utilizzati nella scheda di parzializzazione, il valore delle Tensioni di Linea in uscita dal Variac, che poi vengono utilizzate per alimentare il set-up, è stato regolato a circa 330Vac, invece dei 380Vac dichiarati nel TPR2. Tale variazione non ha impatto sulle misure del PCE-830 che, come verificabile dal Manuale, ha un range operativo, per le Tensioni di ingresso, compreso tra i 20 e i 600 Vac pertanto le misure dello strumento si svolgono regolarmente anche con dei valori di Tensione di Linea leggermente inferiori ai 380Vac. Nella Figura 14 è visibile il Variac Trifase utilizzato per produrre le Tensioni di lavoro.

Figura 14 - Variac Trifase

Figura 14 – Variac Trifase

 Il secondo aspetto riguarda la potenza dei resistori utilizzati (le 3 Lampade) che formano il carico Trifase connesso a Triangolo. La potenza complessiva delle Lampade è inferiore ai valori di potenza dichiarata nel TPR2, circa 480W per il test del Dummy e ancora di più durante il Run del Hot-Cat, di conseguenza a parità di condizioni le correnti di Linea risulterebbero inferiori ai valori riportati in quel documento. Per ovviare si è provveduto ad avvolgere più spire (in paricolare 30 spire) dei conduttori di Linea  intorno ai rispettivi Current Probe, in modo da aumentare il valore del Flusso Magnetico circolante nel Current Probe come risultante dall’accoppiamento degli stessi rispetto ai conduttori di Linea. Un dettaglio della soluzione adottata è riportato in Figura 15.

Figura 15 - Accoppiamento alla Linea dei Current

Figura 15 – Accoppiamento alla Linea dei Current Probe

Lo strumento utilizzato è connesso ai 3 Current Probe e alle 3 Tensioni V1, V2 e V3 che, a seconda dei diversi test, sono state connesse “a monte” (upstream) o “a valle” (downstream) del sistema di parzializzazione Trifase. La Figura 16 mostra lo strumento utilizzato.

Figura 16 - PCE-830

Figura 16 – PCE-830

4.1 Prove con lo strumento connesso “a monte”

Dopo aver connesso lo strumento al circuito connettendo le 3 pinze di Tensione prima del sistema di parzializzazione (condizione upstream), si procede al controllo delle grandezze attraverso l’esame del Diagramma dei Fasori che sono visibili nella Figura 17. L’angolo complessivo tra I3 e V31, che appare dai dati sullo schermo, risulta 105° per cui il cos(φ) dovrebbe essere  0.25.

Figura 17 - Diagramma dei Fasori normale

Figura 17 – Diagramma dei Fasori normale

La Tensione è stata parzializzata con una durata pari a 1 ms come visibile nella Figura 18. La scelta del valore è ispirata a quanto mostrato nella Figura 5 del TPR2 (sulla quale torneremo in seguito) nella quale la parzializzazione utilizzata corrisponde all’incirca ad un angolo di conduzione di 18°, cioè ad un periodo di tempo pari a 1 ms.

Figura 18 - Parzializzazione durata 1 ms

Figura 18 – Parzializzazione durata 1 ms

Le 3 Lampade sono debolemente illuminate a causa della parzializzazione delle tensioni  come visibile in Figura 19.

Figura 19 - Il carico composto dalle 3 Lampade

Figura 19 – Il carico composto dalle 3 Lampade

Lo strumento indica le grandezze misurate come in Figura 20. Il  cos(φ) calcolato dallo strumento ed indicato sullo schermo è 0.12.

Figura 20 - Potenza misurata

Figura 20 – Potenza misurata

In queste condizioni la Potenza Attiva stimata dal PCE vale 570W.

A fini di verifica della misura dello strumento si procede ad una misura parallela attraverso la stima del valore rms della Tensione ai capi di una delle lampade utilizzando lo Scopemeter al quale viene anche collegata la Pinza di Corrente Chauvin Arnoux per acquisire il valore della corrente Irms che scorre nel carico. Essendo questo un caso di carico resistivo sarà sufficiente poi moltiplicare tra loro i valori ottenuti per ottenere la potenza consumata da ciascuna Lampada e poi ovviamente moltiplicare il risultato per 3. L’accuratezza del PCE da manuale teoricamente è superiore al sistema Scopemeter + Pinza di Corrente, inoltre le 3 Lampade non sono esattamente identiche per cui la verifica andrebbe considerata unicamente a scopo di verifica del o.d.g.

In figura 21 sono riportati i valori e le forme d’onda rilevati ai capi di una Lampada. Il valore della Tensione Vrms è pari a 35 V mentre la Corrente si calcola tenendo conto del fattore di scala della Pinza di Corrente Chauvin Arnoux (100mV/A), per cui 15.1mVrms misurati dallo Scopemeter corrispondono ad una corrente di 0.151 Arms.

Figura 21 - Potenza misurata. con Scopemeter

Figura 21 – Potenza misurata. con Scopemeter

Sulla base dei valori rilevati la Potenza misurata vale:

Ptot = 3 * [35Vrms * 0.151Arms * 30 * cos(φ)] = 476.6 W

Il coefficiente 30 tiene conto che la corrente misurata in precedenza con il PCE era fittizia perchè ottenuta avvolgendo 30 spire di filo intorno al Probe di Corrente e il cos(φ) unitario è assunto per via del carico resistivo delle Lampade. Questa misura, in teoria meno raffinata, in realtà si avvivcina ai valori reali di potenza consumata. Il valore misurato dal PCE invece è una stima della potenza con un errore di circa il 20%, come anche il Fattore di Cresta.

In Figura 22 (sulla sinistra) sono mostrate invece le tre Tensioni V1, V2 e V3 e le forme d’onda delle tre Correnti di Linea rappresentate temporalmente rispetto alle rispettive Tensioni. La Tensione V1 funge da sincronismo della base tempi e la rappresentazione dello strumento è compatibile con i risultati delle simulazioni del circuito (sulla destra). Nella colonna centrale sempre le stesse Correnti di Linea ma questa volta rappresentate nella schermata che le mostra insieme all’andameno spettrale del segnale parzializzato. In quest’ultima modalità la Corrente di Linea I1 non viene più rappresentata temporalmente in modo corretto e sembra fungere da sincronismo per la sua rappresentazione in accordo a quanto indicato in una nota inserita a pagina 26 del Manuale d’uso:

Nota sul Trigger dal manuale PCE

Nota sul Trigger dello strumento, dal manuale PCE

Figura 22 - Forme d'onda delle Correnti di Linea I1 I2 e I3

Figura 22 – Forme d’onda delle Correnti di Linea I1 I2 e I3

La Figura 23 mostra l’evidenza sperimentale di quanto da noi (e dalla teoria delle reti in Elettrotecnica) affermato in precedenza. Se il carico è costituito dai 3 Resistori connessi a Δ cioè a Triangolo (nel ns caso le 3 Lampade), allora la relazione tra la corrente che scorre in ciascun ramo del carico (la C2 del TPR2) e la corrente di Linea da cui a monte della giunzione (la C1 del TPR2) vale assolutamente  1/√(3).

Figura 23 - Verifica rapporto corrente di Linea (C1) e corrente nella Lampada (C2)

Figura 23 – Verifica rapporto corrente di Linea (C1) e corrente nella Lampada (C2)

 Infatti (sulla sinistra) lo Scopemeter mostra il valore di corrente di Linea misurato attraverso la Pinza di Corrente Chauvin Arnoux, esso vale 27.3 mVrms che per il fattore di scala corrisponde a 0.273 Arms mentre nella parte destra della figura è visibile lo Scopemeter mentre misura la corrente nel carico (una delle Lampade). Il secondo valore è di 15.2 mVrms che, per la medesima ragione di cui sopra, corrisponde a 0.152 Arms. Calcolando il rapporto tra le correnti:

Rapporto tra le correnti = 0.273/0.152 = 1.79

(ricordiamo che √(3) vale circa 1.73)

quindi un rapporto tra le correnti misurate in  accordo con quanto atteso sulla base delle relazioni teoriche che governano i circuiti elettrici, compresa la legge di Kirchhoff (KCL) che il dott. Rossi nella sua esposizione su JoNP applica a suo modo in maniera errata.

Come in precedenza se si inverte un Current Probe (nel caso mostrato quello relativo alla corrente I3)  una Potenza (errata)  viene comunque rilevata. Il Current Probe inveritito è visibile nella Figura 24.

Figura 24 - Current Probe I3 invertito

Figura 24 – Current Probe I3 invertito

Il valore di potenza misurato dallo strumento in queste condizioni è di 150W come visibile in Figura 25.

Figura 25 - Potenza misurata con Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 25 – Potenza misurata con Current Probe 3 invertito

In Figura 26 è mostrato il Diagramma dei Fasori che ovviamente evidenzia l’inversione di 180° del Current Probe della corrente I3.

Figura 26 - Diagramma dei Fasori con Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 26 – Diagramma dei Fasori con Current Probe 3 invertito

In Figura 27 sono mostrate invece le tre Tensioni V1, V2 e V3 e le forme d’onda delle tre Correnti di Linea rappresentate temporalmente rispetto alle rispettive Tensioni. Ricordiamo che la Tensione V1 funge da sincronismo della base tempi e nella colonna di destra sempre le medesime Correnti di Linea rappresentate nella schermata che le mostra insieme all’andameno spettrale del segnale parzializzato. In quest’ultima modalità la Corrente di Linea I1 non viene più rappresentata temporalmente in modo corretto e sembra fungere da sincronismo per la sua rappresentazione.

Figura 27 - Forme d'onda delle Correnti di Linea I1 I2 e I3 invertita

Figura 27 – Forme d’onda delle Correnti di Linea I1 I2 e I3 invertita

 

4.2 Prove con lo strumento connesso “a valle”

La Figura 28 mostra il set-up per le misure con il PCE connesso “a valle” (downstream) del parzializzatore di Tensione. Per queste prove la tensione delle linee Trifase in ingresso al parzializzatore è stata regolata a 310VAc.

Figura 28 - Set-up per le misure a valle

Figura 28 – Set-up per le misure a valle

La figura 29 mostra il Diagramma dei Fasori come risulta quando il PCE è connesso a valle del parzializzatore. Si noti l’instabilità del diagramma dovuto alla parzializzazione del riferimento che questa volta è anch’esso interrotto dalla commutazione ciclica attraverso i TRIAC della scheda elettronica. Un breve filmato disponibile a questo link mostra la condizione sopra descritta.

Figura 29 - Diagramma dei Fasori (a valle) normale

Figura 29 – Diagramma dei Fasori (a valle) normale

 Lo strumento indica le grandezze misurate come visibili in Figura 30.

Figura 30 - Potenza misurata (a valle)

Figura 30 – Potenza misurata (a valle)

In queste condizioni la Potenza Attiva stimata dal PCE vale 410W.

Anche in questo caso, a fini di verifica della misura dello strumento, si procede ad una misura parallela attraverso la stima del valore rms della Tensione ai capi di una delle lampade utilizzando lo Scopemeter al quale viene anche collegata la Pinza di Corrente Chauvin Arnoux per acquisire il valore della corrente Irms che scorre nel carico. Essendo questo un caso di carico resistivo sarà sufficiente poi moltiplicare tra loro i valori ottenuti per ottenere la potenza consumata da ciascuna Lampada e poi ovviamente moltiplicare il risultato per 3.

In figura 31 sono riportati i valori e le forme d’onda rilevati ai capi di una Lampada. Il valore della Tensione Vrms è pari a 31.7 V mentre la Corrente si calcola tenendo conto del fattore di scala della Pinza di Corrente Chauvin Arnoux (100mV/A), per cui 14.4mVrms misurati dallo Scopemeter corrispondono ad una corrente di 0.144 Arms.

Figura 31 - Potenza misurata. con Scopemeter (a valle)

Figura 31 – Potenza misurata. con Scopemeter (a valle)

Sulla base dei valori rilevati la Potenza misurata vale:

Ptot = 3 * [31.7Vrms * 0.144Arms * 30 * cos(φ)] = 410.8 W

Il coefficiente 30 tiene conto che la corrente misurata in precedenza con il PCE era fittizia perchè ottenuta avvolgendo 30 spire di filo intorno al Probe di Corrente e il cos(φ) unitario è assunto per via del carico resistivo delle Lampade. In questo caso i valori di potenza misurati con i due metodi praticamente coincidono.

La Figura 32 mostra nuovamente anche l’evidenza sperimentale di quanto da noi affermato in precedenza. Se il carico è costituito dai 3 Resistori connessi a Δ cioè a Triangolo (nel ns caso le 3 Lampade), allora la relazione tra la corrente che scorre in ciascun ramo del carico (la C2 del TPR2) e la corrente di Linea da cui a monte della giunzione (la C1 del TPR2) vale assolutamente  1/√(3).

Figura 32 - Verifica rapporto corrente di Linea (C1) e corrente nella Lampada (C2)

Figura 32 – Verifica rapporto corrente di Linea (C1) e corrente nella Lampada (C2)

Analogamente a quanto misurato in precedenza, lo Scopemeter mostra il valore di corrente di Linea misurato attraverso la Pinza di Corrente Chauvin Arnoux, esso vale 25.3 mVrms che per il fattore di scala corrisponde a 0.253 Arms mentre nella parte destra della figura è visibile lo Scopemeter mentre misura la corrente nel carico (una delle Lampade). Il secondo valore è di 14.4 mVrms che, per la medesima ragione di cui sopra, corrisponde a 0.144 Arms. Calcolando il rapporto tra le correnti:

Rapporto tra le correnti = 0.253/0.144 = 1.76 (√(3) vale circa 1.73)

quindi ancora si conferma che il rapporto tra la corrente misurata nel tratto C1 del TPR2 e quella misurata nel tratto C2 del TPR2, in  accordo con quanto atteso dalla teoria delle reti, avrebbe dovuto valere √(3) e non 1/2.

La Figura 33 mostra come vengono rappresentate dallo strumento le Tensioni parzializzate V1, V2 e V3. Si noti che le forma d’onda sullo schermo fluttuano e non risultano sempre ben sincronizzate.

Figura 33 - Rappresentazione PCE delle tensioni a valle

Figura 33 – Rappresentazione PCE delle tensioni a valle

 La Figura 34 mostra come vengono rappresentate dallo strumento le Correnti parzializzate I1, I2 e I3. Sono ripresi 2 diversi istanti successivi, si noti che la forma d’onda sullo schermo non risulta più sincronizzata per quanto riguarda la I2 e la I3 mentre la corrente I1 appare sincronizzata sempre sul suo fronte di salita.

Figura 34 - Rappresentazione PCE delle correnti a valle

Figura 34 – Rappresentazione PCE delle correnti a valle

Un breve filmato di ciò che risulta visibile sullo schermo dello strumento come Tensioni e Correnti è disponibile a questo link.

Se si inverte un Current Probe (nel caso mostrato quello relativo alla corrente I3)  una Potenza (errata)  viene comunque rilevata. Il Current Probe inveritito è visibile nella Figura 35.

Figura 35 - Set-up per le misure a valle Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 35 – Set-up per le misure a valle Current Probe 3 invertito

Il valore di potenza misurato dallo strumento in queste condizioni è di 90W come visibile in Figura 36.

Figura 36 - Potenza misurata (a valle) Current probe 3 invertito

Figura 36 – Potenza misurata (a valle) Current Probe 3 invertito

 La Figura 37 mostra come vengono rappresentate dallo strumento le Tensioni parzializzate V1, V2 e V3.

Figura 37 - Rappresentazione PCE delle tensioni a valle Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 37 – Rappresentazione PCE delle tensioni a valle Current Probe 3 invertito

La Figura 38 mostra come vengono rappresentate dallo strumento le Correnti parzializzate I1, I2 e I3 con il Current Probe 3 invertito. Sono ripresi 2 diversi istanti successivi. La forma d’onda sullo schermo non risulta più sincronizzata per quanto riguarda la I2 e la I3 mentre la corrente I1 appare sincronizzata sempre sul suo fronte di salita.

Figura 38 - Rappresentazione PCE delle correnti a valle Current Probe 3 invertito

Figura 38 – Rappresentazione PCE delle correnti a valle Current Probe 3 invertito

Un breve filmato di ciò che risulta visibile sullo schermo dello strumento come Tensioni e Correnti nel caso Current Probe 3 invertito è disponibile a questo link.

4.3 Prove con lo strumento in condizioni di OverLoad (OL)

Al fine di verificare gli effettivi limiti di misura del PCE-830 + Probe PCE-8601 specificatamente per quanto riguarda i valori massimi di corrente che lo strumento è in grado di misurare rimanendo all’interno della dinamica di misura, è stato incrementato il numero di spire avvolte intorno al Current Probe 3, portandolo a 180 spire, al fine di simulare la condizione operativa derivante da una corrente di Linea più elevata rispetto ai precedenti test. L’incremento del numero di spire è stato realizzato, dato lo scopo prettamente dimostrativo, unicamente sulla Linea 3 e la variazione al set-up è mostrata in Figura 39.

Figura 39 - Set-up Correnti elevate su Linea 3

Figura 39 – Set-up Correnti elevate su Linea 3

La Figura 40 mostra la condizione estrema di misura della corrente che cade ancora all’interno della dinamica dello strumento. Il PCE-830 da noi utilizzato arriva a coprire valori di ampiezza della corrente di Linea fino a circa 160 Apeak. La condizione limite di 160 Apeak, come la dinamica del PCE-830 utilizzato, è documentata nel filmato visibile da questo link.

Figura 40 - Corrente di Linea I3 di ampiezza 160 Apeak

Figura 40 – Corrente di Linea I3 di ampiezza 160 Apeak

Appena la corrente di Linea viene incrementata ulteriormente e supera il valore soglia di 160 Apeak lo strumento non consente più la rilevazione dei parametri di misura mostrando chiaramente l’indicazione di “OL” (OverLimit). La Figura 41 mostra la condizione di OL del PCE-830 quando utilizzato in combinazione al Current Probe PCE-8601 e la condizione di OL per la Line 3 è documentata nel filmato visibile da questo link. E’ da notare che quando lo strumento opera in queste condizioni di OL, i valori numerici di Tensione Corrente e Potenza misurati, eccedendo la dinamica dello strumento, non vengono più presentati sullo schermo poichè, verosimilmente, in queste condizioni i valori misurati sono ritenuti inaffidabili.

Figura 41 - Corrente di Linea I3 di ampiezza superiore ai limiti con conseguente segnalazione di OL

Figura 41 – Corrente di Linea I3 di ampiezza superiore ai limiti con conseguente segnalazione di OL

 

5.0 Ulteriori considerazioni

La condizione di OverLimit (OL) del PCE, mostrata in precedenza, è da porre in relazione con quanto gli AA hanno documentato nel TPR2 attraverso la Figura 5. Ricordiamo che questa condizione si manifesta quando lo strumento opera al di fuori della dinamica di misura prevista dalla specifica.

Figura 5 del TPR2

Figura 5 del TPR2

Il testo a commento alla Figura 5 del TPR2 chiarisce che l’immagine in oggetto è relativa al PCE [B], quello posto a valle del parzializzatore, ed il suo scopo è quello di dimostrare che il contenuto in termini di componenti armoniche del segnale misurato (la corrente I3), relativamente alla parte significativa dello spettro, è contenuto entro la 2oa armonica della frequenza fondamentale di rete. Considerare la 20a armonica della fondamentale 50Hz vuol significare che lo spettro, considerato significativo dagli AA, è quello che si estende fino alla frequenza di circa 1kHz.

Inoltre questa figura, fatte le debite proporzioni con il periodo di rete (pari a 20ms), consente (grossomodo) di stimare  l’angolo di conduzione utilizzato  (il tempo di conduzione dei semiconduttori del Fusion che parzializzavano le tensioni Trifase). La stima sulla base di questa immagine è ovviamente un dato approssimato,  però la durata degli impulsi visibili lascerebbe intendere un angolo di circa 17-18°.

Questa stima dell’angolo di conduzione è confermata dall’esame dello spettro del segnale. Le ampiezze delle componenti dello spettro sono distribuite con un andamento assimilabile ad una Sinc [sin(x)/(x)]  il cui primo “null” è posizionato intorno alla 20a armonica (ogni divisione del display del PCE copre 9 armoniche) cioè come detto alla frequenza di 1kHz. A questo spettro in banda base, avente il primo “0” di ampiezza posizionato alla frequenza 1kHz, corrisponde nel dominio del tempo un impulso di durata 1 ms (quindi 1/20 del periodo da 20 ms) che, se proporzionalmente riferito al periodo di 360°, da come risultato un angolo di conduzione di 18°.

Quanto scritto nel TPR2, a commento della Figura 5, riferisce l’intenzione da parte degli AA di documentare che le componenti significative dello spettro del segnale, utilizzato durante i loro test del Hot-Cat, erano limitate ed i valori corrispondenti sono quelli calcolati sopra (se 20a armonica, f=1kHz). Se l’angolo di conduzione fosse stato più stretto (ad esempio i 7-8° da noi citati in precedenza) lo spettro del segnale conseguente risulterebbe più esteso ed il primo “0” delle componenti si sposterebbe a 2.5 kHz cioè non più alla 20a armonica ma oltre la 50a per cui la Figura 5 perderebbe il suo scopo dichiarato, quello di fornire evidenza che le componenti armoniche significative del segnale erano limitate alla 20a armonica. Questa considerazione ci suggerisce di verificare i parametri elettrici e le relative dinamiche di misura sulla base di questo angolo di conduzione (un angolo di circa 18°), in particolare per quanto rigurda il test Hot-Cat in Run.

Sulla base del valore dell’angolo di conduzione di 18° e considerando che la tensione di alimentazione della rete è di 380Vac, è possibile ricavare il valore della  Tensione di Picco associata a quest’angolo vale:

Vpeak = 380 * √(2) * sin(180-18) = 166 Vpeak

se il valore resistivo di ciascuno dei resistori  fosse quello ricavato attraverso il precedente calcolo, cioò sulla base della potenza misurata riportata nel TPR2 per il Run, Rload=0.365 ohm, la corrente Ipeak teorica conseguente varrebbe:

Vpeak/Req = 682 Apeak

[questo valore, presumibilmente, è ridotto per effetto del coefficiente di auto-induzione dei collegamenti; una stima di questo effetto darebbe come risultato una Corrente di Picco che potrebbe aggirarsi intorno ai 420 Apeak]. Eseguendo quindi la verifica, utilizzando il valore di resistenza calcolato sulla base della potenza riportata nel documento, si ottiene un valore di Corrente di Linea di Picco che non risulta per nulla compatibile con la dinamica di misura del Current Probe del PCE 830. La Corrente di Picco risulta assolutamente fuori dalla specifica dello strumento e largamente superiore ai valori e ai limiti previsti per la condizione di OverLoad (OL).

Alle spiegazioni contenute nel TPR2 si aggiunge una precisazione del dott. Rossi su JoNP che specificatamente in merito al significato della Figura 5 scrive:

Spiegazione di Rossi in merito alla Figura 5 del TPR2

Spiegazione di Rossi in merito alla Figura 5 del TPR2

They explained to me that the photo has been taken during the set up of the measurement stuff and they were controlling that the PCE830 was surely able to read perfectly the waves also in extreme conditions: for this reason , as surely have understood the experts and the reviewers to whom the Professors have given the report before the publication, the photo shows the wave also when the system has been put in overload; you can understand it from the acronym “OL” that you can read on the display, while the wave is perfectly described by the instrument.

In questo commento il dott. Rossi, sostanzialmente, sembra confermare che alcune misure (o una parte di esse) del PCE sono state condotte anche in condizioni di forme d’onda “extreme condition“, cioè in particolare quando i parametri elettrici da misurare  erano tali da comportare la condizione operativa di OverLoad per lo strumento. Se questa condizione di OL è stata raggiunta durante il test, si capisce il motivo per il quale gli AA vadano ad occuparsi della condizione anomala del PCE in OL, in quanto lo strumento di per sè, nasce per stimare correttamente i parametri elettrici della rete quando il segnale da misurare resta confinato all’interno del range di misura e della dinamica definita nelle specifiche del costruttore.

Quanto esposto in precedenza, a cui si aggiunge questa ultima considerazione operativa, non risolve i dubbi sulla correttezza delle misure anzi confermerebbe che, in qualche fase della misura del Hot-Cat, lo strumento è stato utilizzato in una condizione di OverLoad e non all’interno della specifica di misura nell’ambito della quale le misure dei parametri elettrici sono definite come accuratezza.

Sulla base di quanto discusso e considerando che le informazioni attualmente inserite nel TPR2 non chiariscono questi importanti aspetti della misura, a nostro avviso sarebbe opportuno gli AA rendano disponibili delle evidenze documentali (Logfile, foto, filmati o altro) utili ad illustrare con sufficiente dettaglio tecnico e chiarezza, lo svolgersi effettivo delle misure.

 

6.0 Conclusioni

Le misure e le considerazioni esposte in questo Post, oltre che come esperienza di laboratorio utile ad approfondire la conoscenza dello strumento in oggetto, hanno messo in evidenza errori ed aspetti dubbi in riferimento alle misure documentate nel TPR2, cioè le misure prese come riferimento applicativo.

A nostro avviso sarebbe auspicabile che gli AA del documento forniscano tutte le spiegazioni e i chiarimenti necessari in riferimento, ad esempio, alla questione della misura della corrente C2 (che non risulta sia 1/2 di quella in C1) ovvero in merito al collegamento effettivo dei resistori durante le prove, ed inoltre le dovute evidenze tecniche che in tutte le prove condotte sia stata sempre rispettata la corretta modalità/dinamica di misura prevista dalla specifica dello strumento.

Pubblicato in Hot-Cat - Misure elettriche | 2 commenti

Analysis of Jed Rothwell’s Report about his calorimetry performed on Mizuno’s cell

First issue: 30/11/2014
Pubblication: 04/12/2014
Revision 1: 06/12/2014
Translation: 10/12/2014
Revision 2: 10/01/2015
Translation: 12/01/2015

Recently, on November 14, 2014 Jed Rothwell published a Report about a calorimetric measurement, performed in the period 16 to 24 October 2014, in the laboratory of dr. Tadahiko Mizuno . The document was subsequently revised by Jed Rothwell on November 24, 2014.

Rothwell asserts that calorimetric measurements performed by Mizuno in the year 2013, as presented in a Report of the same year, showed a significant excess heat, but that the used methodology, the isoperibolic calorimetry, was too complex and vulnerable to criticisms under several respects.

Conversely, Rothwell concludes that the calorimetry described in his Report, to which the present analysis applies, is substantially correct:

There is no likelihood of an instrument error. Only an error in the methodology can disprove these results.

Since an analysis of the Report convinced us that the methodology was still wrong, we contacted the author to discuss with him the technical content. The discussion was wide and long, but did not lead to any agreement on the issue. Therefore an analysis of ours is presented here which, contrasts completely with that by Rothwell: We think it is also widely supported by the experimental data appearing in the Report.

A simple test (see Note 1) lasting about four hours would have been enough to highlight the error making the present analysis not necessary, but since Rothwell said that the test was unnecessary and refused to ask for Mizuno to perform it, we felt necessary and useful to publish this post.

Adiabatic calorimetry

According to the report, Mizuno adopted an adiabatic calorimetry, or, at least, this was his initial intention. In an ideal adiabatic calorimetry, the system under test is confined within a volume that is completely and perfectly insulated. Once the heat capacity of the whole set up is known –it can be normally calculated with sufficient accuracy by theory (as Rothwell did)- it is very simple to evaluate the heat transferred in a given time t, starting from the measured temperature increase of the whole system.

To get meaningful results, it is necessary that the temperature of the whole system be the same (see Note 2). During the test this was obtained wrapping a long plastic pipe around the reactor cell and connecting it to a Dewar vessel acting as a reservoir.

The water circulating in the pipe transfers heat from the hottest parts in the system to the coldest ones ensuring that all the constituent parts of the thermal mass reach the same temperature. The water circulation was forced by a suitable pump. Obviously this pump coupled some energy to the water thus raising the temperature of the entire system.

Were the system ideal and perfectly isolated, we could observe an overall constant slope temperature increase that, in case of a blank test, would provide an estimation of the power coupled by the pump. Such power would eventually be subtracted from the actual measurement (or neglected if small).

In theory, this principle would be applicable also to a real adiabatic calorimeter, where a certain degree of heat exchange exists. In such a condition, the blank test would change the constant slope straight line to a curve that asymptotically approaches a temperature value at which the heat transferred from the pump to the system equals the heat transferred from the system to the environment. Once again, albeit in a slightly more complex way, it would be possible to deduce the power transferred from the pump. Obviously the evaluation accuracy scales with the thermal isolation of the system.

What is reported above is true provided that ambient temperature is constant. Actually, whereas the changes in ambient temperature do not affect the measurement by an ideal adiabatic calorimeter, the same can not be said for a real one.

When a real adiabatic calorimeter is used, one should always check whether the deviations from the ideal situation are small or large. In the present case, as appearing in the graphs reported by the author, the fluctuations of the ambient temperature even exceeded temperature changes induced by the heat to be measured, and the motor of the used pump required a power 3 times higher than the thermal power to be measured; the hydraulic power declared by the manufacturer was equal to the thermal power to be measured.

In this situation, (which would have been better to avoid) it is highly recommended to analyze any system components to be able to evaluate the influence of each of them on the final result. The fact that Rothwell refused to follow a well-founded methodology appears inexplicable to us.

Temperature fluctuations and thermal inertia

Most of the adiabatic calorimetric systems exhibit very high internal and external time constants. The internal time constant identifies the response time of the system to an input step of thermal energy within the system (the internal heat to be measured); on the other side, the external time constant identifies the step response to environmental temperature changes. The former value is normally quite high because of the fact that the thermal mass is normally high and “distributed” as opposed to a heat source well localized. This means we need to wait enough time to have the heat spread evenly over the entire thermal mass. This time constant should be made as small as possible during the design phase to have a faster response of the system, even if in general it does not affect the accuracy of the measurement.

The external time constant is normally chosen very high on purpose, due to the fact that these systems normally possess a very high insulation value, so that the product (thermal capacity) * (heat resistance) towards the environment is very high. This time constant should be made as large as possible and should be much greater than the period of the fluctuation of the ambient temperature (if present), so that the system acts as a low pass filter and the fluctuations of ambient temperature appear attenuated on the measurement fluid.

This concept becomes very important whenever the fluctuations in ambient temperature are not negligible compared to the temperature change of the measurement fluid.

Unfortunately, these concepts do not seem clear to the author and he does not care that the external time constant of the test system is less than 6 hours, or about one quarter of the period of variation of the ambient temperature while, as mentioned above, should always be considerably higher; even more in this case as the fluctuation of the ambient temperature is very high.

Where does the excess heat come from

The average water temperature during a full day was about 2 °C above the ambient one. Since the system is not perfectly insulated this indicates a heat flow from inside to outside.

Each test performed during the day by Mizuno, consisted of a variable number of current pulses (1 to 5), applied to an electric resistance made by Nickel or Palladium in a Deuterium athmosphere. Taking into consideration the test of October 21, which is extensively considered in the report, three 20W pulses were applied to the heather, the duration of each pulse being 500 seconds, so that 30.000J of total energy were supplied.

Since the heat capacity of the system was 41.000J / °C (calculated in Report after the content of water and the mass of the stainless steel vessel), this amount of energy would have raised the temperature of an ideal system by 0.73 °C.

Since the system is not thermally insulated, and the ambient temperature is lower than the water temperature (Figure 12 of the Report)

Figure 12 of Rothwell’s Report

Figure 12 of Rothwell’s Report

that would lead us to say that, in the absence of other heat sources, the temperature increase must be less than 0.73 °C. Since the temperature increased from the beginning of the first pulse to a maximum after the third peak by 2.5 °C( Figure 7 of the Report),

Figure 7 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 7 of the Report by Rothwell

Rothwell infers that these pulses have triggered an exothermic process in the reactor. If, as supposed by Rothwell the power transferred from the pump to the fluid is equal to 0.25W (see Note 5), the energy provided by the pump to the water in the corresponding period (6 hours) was equal to 5400J, corresponding to a temperature rise of the system of 0.13 °C. The remaining 1.6 °C would be provided by the exothermic reaction that would have produced an average extra-power of approximately 3W.

Furthermore Rothwell asserts that, since the pump was not turned off neither during the night, the power transferred to the fluid is not important, since it simply moves the zero of adiabatic calorimetry (it is an offset). This assertion (true in the case of system with very high external time constants) would lead to estimate about 3.25W of power generated by the exothermic reaction, as indicated in Table 2 of the Report.

We assert, instead, that the power transferred from the pump to the system was much higher: this fact, combined with a strong variation of the ambient temperature and the low external time constant, led to water temperature changes that have been misunderstood and that can be explained without invoking excess heat from alleged nuclear reactions.

At this point it is obvious that it is crucial to know how much heat was transferred from the pump (see Note 3).

Were the calorimeter ideal (no dissipation) it would be easy to deduce the power transferred from the pump to the water. In this case if it were correct that, as Rothwell thinks, power was equal to 0.25W, the heat introduced by the pump during the 24 hours would be 21600J, which would bring the expected increase (always an ideal adiabatic calorimeter) at 0.52 °C in 24 hours.

The calorimeter is not, however, perfectly isolated, so the pump that continuously injects power raises the mean temperature of the water up to a value at which the heat dissipated equates the heat pumped in.

The average difference between the water temperature and the environment during 24 hours is found to be about 2 °C, a value too high (considering the insulation system which, as we will see below we calculated to be about 0.5 °C / W) to be generated by only 0.25W coming from the pump. Even this consideration would therefore seem to confirm the existence of an internal source of heat.

Our explanation is very simple: the water pump dissipates a power far greater than that estimated by Rothwell, approximately 4W.

The fact that the pump dissipates much more than 0.25W , as estimated by Rothwell, and probably about 3.9W is supported by at least three considerations:

1) the used pump has a prevalence of up to 1 m H2O, and a maximum capacity of 8 liters per minute. In the mid-point of its characteristic, the values are: 0.6 m and 4 l / min. The hydraulic power corresponding is: Pi = 0.4W and considering an efficiency of 50% (already very high for pumps of this size), the power transferred from the impeller to the water is about 0.8W, which must be added the heat flowing from the engine (12W) to the water through magnetic coupling.

2) the pump manufacturer (page 5 of the datasheet) states a mechanical power output of 3W (see Note 4).

3) it is possible to estimate the heat transferred to the water from the pump using the same diagrams presented in the report under scrutiny.

The Figures 13, 14 and 15 of the Report refer to the tests, respectively, of 21 and 22 October.

Figure 13 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 13 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 14 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 14 of the Report by Rothwell

They show the behavior of night temperatures as well. During the night of 21st ( Figure 15 ), the pump stopped due to a fault after 7 hours from the start of data recording.

Figure 15 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 15 of the Report by Rothwell

This coincidence allows us to calculate in a simple way the power transferred from the pump (see Note 2). Consider the two graphs in the period 8.2 – 16.3 (8.1 hours). We focus on energy balance.

In the two cases the thermal mass is different; actually in the case of Figure 14 it is, as already seen, 41.000J / °C, while in the case of Figure 15 (pump not working), the thermal mass is to be divided into two parts as the water does not circulate and the Dewar vessel remains isolated from the rest of the circuit. In this case, according to the report, the thermal mass is 28.000J / °C for the reactor, and 13.000J / °C for the Dewar.

From Figure 15 (pump not running) we can see that in the considered time, the average difference between the internal reactor temperature and the ambient temperature was 1.4 °C and that the internal temperature dropped by 2.7 °C. The average difference between the internal Dewar temperature and the ambient temperature was 3.5 °C and the internal Dewar temperature decreased by 0.8 °C.

From Figure 14 (running pump) we can see that in the considered time, the average difference between the internal temperature of the reactor and the ambient temperature was 3 °C and that the internal temperature dropped by 1.4 °C.

From data in Figure 15 (pump not running), we can write for the reactor:

(a) Power released to the environment = Kr * 1.4
(b) Decrease of reactor internal energy = 2.7 * 28000 = 75.600J

and for the Dewar:
(a’) Power released into the environment = Kd * 3.5
(b’) Decrease of Dewar internal energy = 0.8 * 13,000 = 10.400J

From data in Figure 14 (running pump) we can write:
(c) Power released to the environment = Kt * 3
(d) Decrease of system internal energy = 1.4 * 41000 = 57.400J

From (a) and (b) we obtain: Kr = 75,600 / (1.4 * 8.1 * 3600) = 1.85 W / °C

From (a’) and (b’) we obtain: Kd = 10,400 / (3.5 * 8.1 * 3600) = 0.1W / °C
We get easily Kt = Kr + Kd = 1.95 W / °C

From (c) and (d) we obtain: Ppump * 8.1 * 3600 + 57,400 = 1.95 * 3 * 8.1 * 3600
The pump power equals 3.9W

If we add to this power the power released by the current peaks averaged over 24 hours [30,000 J / (24 * 3600) s ≈ 0:35 W] we can perfectly explain the average daily increase of about 2 °C in the system temperature versus the ambient temperature:

P = Kt * Δ t = (1.95W / °C * 2 °C) ≈ (3.9W + 0.35W) [Watt]

Further confirmation of assessment errors in the Report

There are four more indications of no excess heat. First, if you look at Figure 12

Figure 12 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 12 of the Report by Rothwell

You can see that at the very left, before the start of the first pulse, the water temperature is already rising with a slope nearly identical to that which is maintained throughout the test period, until the end of the third pulse. The same thing is seen in Figure 6

Figure 6 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 6 of the Report by Rothwell

where we see also that the temperature of the inner wall of the reactor starts increasing before the beginning of the first pulse. This shows that it is not a nuclear reaction triggered by the peaks of electrical power input to generate the rising temperature of the fluid, but it is the heat exchange with the ambient temperature which is higher with respect to the night of about 3 °C as can be seen from Figure 14 (even if this refers to the following night). This point seems not to be clearly understood by Rothwell who answered the question by saying that this would be contrary to the second law of thermodynamics.

The second indication is given by Rothwell himself: as well during the vacuum test (that should not produce any excess heat), a significant “excess heat” (approximately 1.5W) was measured. Rothwell believes that despite vacuum conditions, a modest nuclear reaction has taken place. We are not able to provide a full explanation about the fact that in this test under vacuum the temperature raised to a value about 1 °C lower than that obtained in the actual test, since we do not know exactly the difference between the two tests. Certainly, in this case 5 current pulses were used instead of 3 (Figure 10 )

Figure 10 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 10 of the Report by Rothwell

And this fact has led to a larger increase of the system temperature so that subsequently less heat from the environment is received. It is not clear why during this test, it was decided to adopt a higher number of pulses. Also the fact that the x-coordinate is not an absolute time, does not help to understand at what time of day the various tests have taken place. Clearly, since the heat exchange between the air and the system is related to the temperature of the air and this varied by some 2.5 °C during 24 hours, tests carried out at different times can give a different increase of the water temperature.

The third indication relies on the fact that in all cases the temperature of the reactor is lower (even if slightly) than the water temperature (see Figures 8 , 13 and 14 ).

Figure 8 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 8 of the Report by Rothwell

This would be a nonsense if the heat came from a nuclear reaction inside the reactor, whereas it is obvious when you consider that the ambient temperature, higher during the day when you run the tests, is providing energy to the water that circulates outside the reactor and the Dewar: the water itself transmits the heat to the reactor which stays always a bit cooler.

The fourth indication as well refers to the analysis of Figure 7.

Figure 7 of the Report by Rothwell

Figure 7 of the Report by Rothwell

If you look closely at the trend of the reactor walls temperature; you may note initially the sharp rise in temperature due to the application of the electrical pulse, what should have triggered the nuclear reaction. Subsequently, the wall temperature falls during a cooling phase to reach a value of relative minimum which represents the depletion of the thermal transient. From that value of the minimum wall temperature should remain almost unchanged, but in reality this happens only for a short period (while, instead, the water temperature continues to rise with its slope fairly constant) and subsequently we note, however, that the wall temperature continues increasing faithfully following the thermal evolution of the water temperature. This behavior thus leads to deduce that the temperature of water determines and imposes the temporal evolution of the temperature of the reactor walls and not vice versa as the Report would like to demonstrate.

Conclusions
From what we said above, one can concluded that the reported measurements do not show any evidence of anomalous heat: The allegation comes from a poor interpretation of the data collected from the system. The error finds its basis in the fact that the adiabatic calorimetry was assumed to be ideal: that is, very well insulated, and insensitive to variations in ambient temperature; moreover, a negligible power coupled by the pump to the circulating water. A simple calorimetric test with only the pump, to the author refused this suggestion of ours, would have immediately shown the error.

Considerations added on 06/12/2014

In a recent e-mail, Jed Rothwell asks our Group to insert some considerations written in his e-mail. In the following you can find the consideration coming from Rothwell and our replies.

JR-1) “…With this method of adiabatic calorimetry the 0.6°C temperature increase over ambient is not included in the calculation of excess heat, because the pump is left on all the time, and it always does the same amount of work, so the temperature is always 0.6°C above ambient. To be specific, with this method, the starting water temperature is subtracted from the ending water temperature, and the starting temperature is already 0.6°C warmer than ambient.
With other methods of calorimetry, heat is measured by comparing the reactor temperature to ambient. With these methods, heat from the pump has to be subtracted from the total, or it will be mistaken for excess heat.

GSVIT-1) We do not agree at all. The pump was not stopped during the test and, as Rothwell says, we are speaking about a differential temperature increase equal to +2.5°C. Additional heat coming from the pump increases the final result; that is, the ΔT considered by Rothwell to be the smoking gun of the alleged production of anomalous heat. Obviously, this is valid until thermal equilibrium is reached.

JR-2) “Regarding Fig. 12 you note correctly that the temperature of the water was rising before the first pulse. That is mainly because the ambient temperature was rising.

GSVIT-2) This statement is exactly in the line of our Post: the system external time constant is too short when compared to the external temperature change period: Actually it is true that the water temperature (as Rothwell is saying in his e-mail) changes due to an ambient temperature fluctuation.

Note 1 As you will see in the analysis, the setup by Mizuno used a centrifugal pump driven by 12W electric motor that Mizuno himself measured to absorb 10W. The power fed into the water from the pump is completely neglected in the report. The motivation for this choice was due to the fact that Rothwell had estimated a very low power, around 0.25W. The characteristic curves of the pump show that the hydraulic power the pump is able to provide is 3W and the same manufacturer indicates that power as “output power” in the datasheet of the pump . When such data were presented to Rothwell, he argued that the pump had been working with a flow rate of 8l / min without any back pressure, so the coupled power was virtually zero. The pump actually was pushing the water in a plastic pipe of the length of 16m and a diameter of 10mm. An approximate calculation of the pressure drop leads us to say that in those conditions the actual flow rate was 1 l / min and that the curve (which has a maximum head of 1m) worked at the extreme left of the curve. Actually, this position is effectively the position of minimum power consumption for a centrifugal pump contrary to what Rothwell thought believing that the minimum absorption were at the right end. In any case, in addition to the power coupled to the water by the impeller, there is a part of heat that is transferred from the engine to the water through the magnetic coupling used in this type of pumps, heat that Rothwell neglects without being able to bring any justification. Actually he tries to support his claim by arguing that the engine was hot, while the pump was at the water temperature. This assertion is, of course, obvious and clearly can not indicate how much heat is flowing from the motor to the pump; but that concept seems not understandable by Rothwell. Since the Mizuno setup used a very well insulated Dewar flask, we proposed them to perform a measurement of the power delivered by pump to the circulating water simply by closing the circuit outside the Dewar with insulated pipes as short as possible (although it would have been more appropriate to include a localized pressure loss equal to the pressure drop of the actual circuit in order to make the pump work at the same point). Rothwell defined this test useless and refused to ask for Mizuno to run it.
Note 2 Alternatively, one can take temperature measurements of the all the various parts of the system that are supposed to stay at different temperatures (typical method of isoperibolic calorimeters). This procedure has the advantage of not requiring a fluid to make  the system temperature uniform, but requires knowledge  of  the heat capacity all over the system, what is not always easy or feasible; for this reason the choice of having circulating water is entirely acceptable.
Nota 3 Rothwell attempted as well, in a further communication, to perform this calculation, but it is unclear to us which system he used since he came to the conclusion that the power loss was only 0.25W.
Nota 4 Rothwell indicates an Iwaki MD6 magnetic drive pump, that, as per datasheet, incorporates a 22W motor; afterwards, in a private communication, he informed us that actually the setup used a slightly different pump, powered by a 12W electric motor.
Nota 5 Rothwell (in a subsequent calculation) concludes that the pump would released at most 0.4 W power. He does not exclude that the real power delivered by the pump could be even higher (no more than 1W) but he considers this possibility highly unlikely.

 

We thank the author of the Report, Jed Rothwell, for allowing the GSVIT to freely use the contents of his document.

 

Appendix: Further analysis with numerical simulations

To further verify what is presented above, a simulation was carried out in order to reconstruct the experimental temperature curves as a function of time. The simulation was carried out for the tests shown in Figures 14 and 15, using the equation of the thermal equilibrium of a body:

– M c P dT + P dt – KT (T – Tenv) dt = 0         (eq.1)

where:

  • M cP is the Heat Capacity (Mass x Specific Heat) [J/°C]
  • P is the Power [W]
  • KT is the overall Transmittance (Transmittance x outer Surface of the system) [W/°C]
  • dT is the Temperature interval
  • dt is the time interval

Introducing the internal time constant, cT = M cP / KT, the above equation can be rewritten in the following way:

P / KT dt = cT dT + (T – Tenv) dt       (eq.2)

The first simulation provides the curves Tdewar and Tbody versus time, shown in Figure 14 in the original Report by Jed Rothwell, starting from the sixth hour of the test (night phase). The curves were obtained by numerically solving the equation (1) with the following parameters:

  • t = 6h → TD = TB = 23.5 °C
  • M cP = 41000 J/°C
  • P = 4 W

The room temperature has been interpolated by means of several linear correlations to describe the actual measured curve. K T instead has been considered as a fitting parameter.

Figure A1 below shows the simulation results obtained with KT = 1.95 W/°C: the simulation graphs are superimposed to those in the test report by Rothwell. It is to be noted that the curves are almost indistinguishable and are obtained taking a pump power equal to 4 W.

Figure A1 - Simulation October 22 P = 4W

Figure A1 – Simulation October 22 P = 4W

Subsequently, data of Figure 15 was reconstructed with the same procedure using the equation (1) written both for the dewar vessel and the reactor body:

MD cP,D dTD = – KD (TD – Tenv) dt       (eq.3)

MB cP,B dTB = – KB (TB – Tenv) dt       (eq.4)

It is important to note that during this test, the power terms are zero since the pump failed and the reactor was off.

For equation (3) the following parameters were considered (taken from the original report):

  • t = 7.5 h → TD = 25.5 °C
  • MD cP = 13000 J/°C
  • KD = 0.1 W/°C

whereas for equation (4) the following:

  • t = 7.5 h → TB = 25.1 °C
  • MB cP = 28000 J/°C
  • KB = KT – KD = 1.85 W/°C

The following figure A2 shows the plots obtained using the above described model; as previously, the test graph and the simulation are superimposed:

Figure A2 - Simulation October 21 - Pump fails at night

Figure A2 – Simulation October 21 – Pump fails at night

It can be seen from this graph, a good agreement of the model results with the experimental ones (practically indistinguishable); this is a strong confirmation of our analysis previously reported in the present post.

Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Contrassegnato | 1 commento

Analisi della Calorimetria della cella Mizuno (e del relativo Report) di Jed Rothwell

Stesura del Report in data: 30/11/2014
Pubblicazione: 04/12/2014
Revisione 1: 06/12/2014
Traduzione: 10/12/2014
Revisione 2: 10/01/2015
Traduzione: 12/01/2015

English version available at this link.

Il 14 Novembre 2014 Jed Rothwell ha pubblicato il Report di una sua misura calorimetrica, effettuata nel periodo 16-24 ottobre 2014, presso il laboratorio del dr. Tadahiko Mizuno. Jed Rothwell ha successivamente revisionato il suo documento il 24 Novembre 2014.

Rothwell asserisce che le misure calorimetriche eseguite dallo stesso Mizuno nell’anno 2013, e riportate in un proprio Report dello stesso anno, evidenziavano un notevole eccesso di calore, ma che la metodologia utilizzata, riconducibile a una specie di Calorimetria isoperibolica, era troppo complessa e appariva criticabile sotto vari punti di vista.
Al contrario Rothwell trova la Calorimetria descritta nel suo Report, di cui qui è stata fatta l’analisi, sostanzialmente corretta e conclude:

There is no likelihood of an instrument error. Only an error in the methodology can disprove these results.

Non c’è evidenza di errori di misura. Solo un errore nella metodologia può rendere falsi i risultati”.

Poiché l’analisi del Report di Rothwell ci ha convinti che l’errore nella metodologia c’era, abbiamo contattato l’autore per discutere tecnicamente con lui dei contenuti. La discussione è stata ampia e prolungata, ma non ha portato a un accordo sulla questione.

Quello che presentiamo qui è quindi la nostra analisi, che si contrappone completamente a quella di Rothwell, e che pensiamo sia anche ampiamente supportata dai dati sperimentali riportati nel Report stesso in analisi.
Ci rammarica il fatto che un semplice test (vedere Nota 1) della durata di circa 4 ore sarebbe stato sufficiente ad evidenziare l’errore senza rendere necessaria la presente analisi, ma dal momento che Rothwell ha dichiarato quella richiesta inutile e si è rifiutato di richiederla a Mizuno, abbiamo ritenuto necessario ed utile pubblicare questo Post.

Calorimetria adiabatica
Come si vede dal Report la Calorimetria adottata da Mizuno è del tipo adiabatico, o almeno questa inizialmente era l’intenzione. In una Calorimetria ideale di questo tipo l’oggetto da cui si vuole misurare il calore uscente viene rinchiuso all’interno di un volume completamente e perfettamente isolato termicamente. Una volta nota la capacità termica di tutto l’insieme, cosa normalmente ottenibile con sufficiente approssimazione per via teorica (via seguita anche da Rothwell), è immediato calcolare il calore ceduto in un determinato tempo t, una volta misurato l’innalzamento di temperatura dell’intero sistema.

Affinchè questo calcolo abbia senso, occorre che l’intero sistema sia isotermo (vedere Nota 2). Nel test in esame ciò era garantito da un lungo tubo in plastica che era avvolto attorno alla cella e si collegava a un serbatoio costituito da un vaso Dewar. L’acqua che circolava nel tubo prelevava il calore dalle parti più calde e lo portava a quelle più fredde garantendo che tutte le parti costituenti la massa termica si trovassero alla stessa temperatura. La circolazione dell’acqua era garantita da una pompa centrifuga. Ovviamente questa pompa immetteva energia nell’acqua che contribuisce ad innalzare la temperatura dell’intero sistema.

Se ci fossimo trovati davanti a un sistema ideale, perfettamente isolato, quello che avremmo osservato sarebbe stato un innalzamento a pendenza costante della temperatura col passare del tempo. Dalla pendenza di tale curva durante una prova in bianco si sarebbe potuto dedurre la potenza ceduta dalla pompa. Tale potenza sarebbe poi stata sottratta a quella misurata durante i test effettivi (o trascurata se piccola, in un’ottica cautelativa).

In teoria tale principio sarebbe applicabile anche a un Calorimetro adiabatico reale, che cioè presenta un certo grado di scambio termico. Quello che otterremmo in questo test in bianco sarebbe una salita non più rettilinea della temperatura, ma una salita asintotica fino a un valore di temperatura al quale il calore ceduto dalla pompa uguaglia il calore ceduto dal sistema all’ambiente. Ancora una volta, seppure in modo leggermente più complesso, sarebbe stato possibile dedurre la potenza ceduta dalla pompa. Ovviamente la cosa sarebbe tanto più precisa quanto più il sistema risulta termicamente isolato.

In realtà quanto asserito sopra risulta vero a condizione che la temperatura ambiente risulti costante. Mentre infatti le variazioni della temperatura ambiente non influiscono sulla misura di un Calorimetro adiabatico ideale, lo stesso ovviamente non si può dire per uno reale.
Quando ci si trova davanti una Calorimetria adiabatica reale occorre sempre verificare se gli scostamenti rispetto alla situazione ideale sono piccoli o importanti. Nel caso in esame, come si può vedere dai grafici riportati dall’autore, le fluttuazioni della temperatura ambiente erano addirittura superiori all’innalzamento di temperatura dovuto al calore da misurare, e la pompa installata per la circolazione aveva un motore di potenza 3 volte superiore alla potenza termica da misurare e una potenza idraulica dichiarata dal costruttore pari alla potenza termica da misurare.

Davanti a questa situazione (che sarebbe comunque da evitare) come minimo occorre sempre scomporre il sistema e analizzarlo nei suoi componenti in modo da poter risalire all’influenza di ognuno di essi sul risultato finale. Il fatto che Rothwell si sia rifiutato di seguire tale assodata metodologia appare inspiegabile.

Fluttuazione della temperatura ambiente e inerzie termiche
La maggior parte dei sistemi calorimetrici adiabatici presentano una costante di tempo interna e esterna molto elevata. Con costante di tempo interna ci si riferisce al tempo di risposta del sistema a un gradino di energia termica immesso all’interno del sistema stesso (il calore che vogliamo misurare); mentre con costante di tempo esterna ci si riferisce alla risposta ad un gradino di temperatura ambiente. Il primo valore è normalmente piuttosto elevato a causa del fatto che la massa termica è normalmente elevata e “distribuita” a fronte di una fonte di calore molto localizzata. Occorre cioè attendere un tempo elevato perché il calore si distribuisca in modo uniforme su tutta la massa termica. Questa costante di tempo dovrebbe essere resa la più piccola possibile per avere una maggiore rapidità di risposta del sistema anche se di per sé non influisce sulla precisione della misura.

La costante di tempo esterna è normalmente volutamente molto elevata e tale valore elevato è dovuto al fatto che questi sistemi hanno normalmente una coibentazione molto spinta, per cui il prodotto (capacità termica)*(resistenza termica) verso l’ambiente è molto elevato. Questa costante di tempo dovrebbe essere resa la più grande possibile e dovrebbe essere molto superiore al periodo della fluttuazione della temperatura ambiente (se presente), in modo che il sistema funga da filtro passa basso e le fluttuazioni di temperatura ambiente appaiano attenuate sul fluido di misura.

Tale concetto è tanto più importante quanto più le fluttuazioni della temperatura ambiente sono non trascurabili rispetto alla variazione di temperatura del fluido di misura.
Purtroppo questi concetti non sembrano chiari all’autore che non si cura del fatto che la costante di tempo esterna del sistema in esame è inferiore a 6 ore, cioè circa un quarto del periodo di variazione della temperatura ambiente mentre, come ricordato sopra, dovrebbe sempre essere notevolmente superiore, a maggior ragione in questo caso in cui la fluttuazione della temperatura ambiente è molto elevata.

Da dove proviene il calore in eccesso
La temperatura media dell’acqua nel corso delle 24 ore è circa 2°C superiore a quella ambiente. Dal momento che il sistema non è perfettamente isolato termicamente ciò significa che del calore è introdotto all’interno.
Ogni test di Mizuno, realizzato durante il giorno, consisteva nell’applicare una serie di Impulsi di corrente, da 1 a 5 a una resistenza elettrica in Nichel o Palladio immersa in Deuterio. Prendendo in considerazione il test del 21 ottobre a cui il Report fa maggior riferimento, gli impulsi erano 3, la potenza applicata risultava di 20W, e essendo la durata di ogni impulso 500 secondi, l’energia totale fornita era di 30.000J
Poiché la capacità termica del sistema (calcolata nel Report in base al contenuto di acqua e alla massa di Acciaio inox) era di 41.000J/°C, tale quantità di energia avrebbe dovuto innalzare il sistema, supposto ideale, di 0.73°C.

Il fatto che il sistema non sia termicamente isolato e poiché la temperatura ambiente è inferiore alla temperatura dell’acqua (Figura 12 del Report)

Figura 12 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 12 del Report di Rothwell

porterebbe a dire che, in assenza di altre fonti di calore, l’innalzamento di temperatura doveva risultare inferiore a 0.73°C. Poiché l’innalzamento di temperatura tra l’inizio del primo impulso e il massimo dopo il terzo picco è risultato di 2.5°C (Figura 7 del Report),

Figura 7 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 7 del Report di Rothwell

Rothwell deduce che tali impulsi abbiano innescato un processo esotermico all’interno del reattore. Se, come suppone Rothwell la potenza ceduta dalla pompa al fluido è pari a 0.25W (vedere Nota 5), l’energia fornita dalla pompa all’acqua nel periodo corrispondente (6 ore)  sarebbe stato pari a 5400J, corrispondenti a un innalzamento di temperatura del sistema di 0.13°C. I rimanenti 1.6°C sarebbero stati forniti dalla reazione esotermica che avrebbe erogato una potenza pari a circa 3W.

Inoltre Rothwell asserisce che, dal momento che la pompa non veniva spenta nemmeno di notte, la potenza da essa ceduta al fluido non è di nessuna importanza, dal momento che essa sposta semplicemente lo zero della calorimetria adiabatica. Questa asserzione (vera nel caso di sistema con costante di tempo esterna estremamente elevata) porterebbe a stimare la potenza generata dalla supposta reazione esotermica in 3.25W che è (circa) quanto indicato nella Tabella 2 del Report.
Noi asseriamo invece che la potenza ceduta dalla pompa era notevolmente superiore a quanto indicato da Rothwell e che questo, unito alla forte variazione della temperatura ambiente e alla costante di tempo esterna del sistema insufficiente ha portato a variazioni di temperatura dell’acqua che sono state male interpretate e che sono spiegabili senza mettere in gioco eccessi di calore provenienti da presunte reazioni nucleari.

A questo punto è ovvio che diventa cruciale sapere quanto calore veniva ceduto dalla pompa (vedere Nota 3).
Se il Calorimetro fosse ideale (dissipazioni nulle) sarebbe semplice dedurre la potenza ceduta dalla pompa all’acqua. In questo caso se fosse corretta la supposizione di Rothwell che tale calore era pari a 0.25W, il calore introdotto dalla pompa nel corso delle 24 ore sarebbe stato 21600J, che avrebbero portato l’innalzamento atteso (sempre in un calorimetro adiabatico ideale) a 0.52°C ogni 24 ore.
Il calorimetro non è però perfettamente isolato, per cui la pompa che immette continuamente potenza innalza la temperatura media dell’acqua (nelle 24 ore) fino a un valore al quale il calore dissipato eguaglia il calore introdotto.
La differenza media tra la temperatura dell’acqua e quella dell’ambiente sulle 24 ore risulta essere di circa 2°C, valore troppo elevato (considerando l’isolamento del sistema che, come si vedrà in seguito abbiamo calcolato essere di circa 0.5 °C/W) per essere generato soltanto da 0.25W provenienti dalla pompa. Anche questa considerazione sembrerebbe quindi confermare l’esistenza di una fonte interna di calore.
La nostra spiegazione è molto semplice: quella pompa dissipa nell’acqua una potenza ben superiore a quella stimata da Rothwell, pari a circa 4W.
Il fatto che la pompa dissipi molto di più dei 0.25W stimati da Rothwell e probabilmente circa 3.9W è supportato da almeno 3 considerazioni:

1) quella pompa ha una prevalenza massima di 1 m H2o, e una portata massima di 8 litri al minuto. Nel punto intermedio della caratteristica i valori valgono: 0.6 m e 4 l/min. La potenza idraulica corrispondente vale: Pi = 0.4W e considerando un rendimento del 50% (già molto elevato per pompe di questa dimensione), la potenza ceduta dalla girante all’acqua vale circa 0.8W, cui va aggiunto il calore che fluisce dal motore (12W) all’acqua tramite l’accoppiamento magnetico.
2) il costruttore della pompa a pagina 5 del datasheet dichiara una potenza resa di 3W (vedere Nota 4).
3) è possibile stimare il calore ceduto all’acqua dalla pompa utilizzando gli stessi diagrammi presentati nel report in esame.

Le Figure 13, 14 e 15 del Report si riferiscono alle prove rispettivamente del 21 e 22 ottobre.

Figura 13 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 13 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 14 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 14 del Report di Rothwell

Esse riportano l’andamento delle temperature anche della notte. Nella notte del 21 (Figura 15) la pompa si è fermata per un guasto dopo 7 ore dall’inizio della registrazione.

Figura 15 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 15 del Report di Rothwell

Questa fortunata coincidenza permette di calcolare in modo molto semplice la potenza ceduta dalla pompa (vedere Nota 2). Consideriamo i due grafici nel periodo 8.2 – 16.3 (pari a 8.1 ore). Facciamo il bilancio energetico.
Nei due casi la massa termica è differente, infatti nel caso di Figura 14 essa vale, come già visto, 41.000J/°C, mentre nel caso di Figura 15 (pompa ferma), la massa termica deve essere considerata divisa in due dato che l’acqua non circola e il vaso Dewar rimane isolato dal resto del circuito. In questo caso, in base a quanto scritto nel report, la massa termica vale 28.000J/°C per il reattore, mentre la massa termica del solo Dewar è di 13.000J/°C.

Dalla Figura 15 (pompa ferma) possiamo vedere che nel tempo considerato la differenza media tra la temperatura interna del reattore e la temperatura ambiente è stata di 1.4°C e che la temperatura interna è scesa di 2.7°C. La differenza media tra la temperatura interna del Dewar e la temperatura ambiente è stata di 3.5°C e che la temperatura interna del Dewar è scesa di 0.8°C.

Dalla Figura 14 (pompa in marcia) possiamo vedere che nel tempo considerato la differenza media tra la temperatura interna del reattore e la temperatura ambiente è stata di 3°C e che la temperatura interna è scesa di 1.4°C.

Dai dati della Figura 15 (pompa ferma) possiamo scrivere per quanto riguarda il solo reattore:
(a) Potenza ceduta all’ambiente =  Kr * 1.4
(b) Diminuzione di energia interna del reattore = 2.7 * 28000 = 75.600J
e per quanto riguarda il Dewar possiamo scrivere:
(a’) Potenza ceduta all’ambiente = Kd * 3.5
(b’) Diminuzione di energia interna del Dewar = 0.8 * 13.000 = 10.400J

Dai dati della Figura 14 (pompa in marcia) possiamo scrivere:
(c) Potenza ceduta all’ambiente = Kt * 3
(d) Diminuzione di energia interna del sistema = 1.4 * 41000 = 57.400J

Dalle relazioni (a) e ( b) si ottiene: Kr = 75.600/(1.4*8.1*3600) = 1.85 W/°C
Dalle relazioni (a’) e (b’) si ottiene: Kd = 10.400/(3.5*8.1*3600) = 0.1W/°C
Da cui si ottiene Kt = Kr+Kd = 1.95 W/°C
Dalle relazioni (c) e (d) si ottiene: Ppompa * 8.1 * 3600 + 57.400 = 1.95 * 3 * 8.1 * 3600
da cui si ottiene: Potenza pompa = 3.9W

La potenza derivante dalla pompa, unita alla potenza immessa mediante i picchi di corrente riferita alle 24 ore che invece vale: [30.000 J/(24 h*36o0 s) ≈ 0.35 W]

spiega perfettamente l’innalzamento medio sulle 24 ore di circa 2°C della temperatura del sistema rispetto alla temperatura ambiente, infatti:
P = Kt * delta t  e sostituendo si verifica che:

(3.9W + 0.35W) ≈ (1.95W/°C * 2°C)   [Watt]

Ulteriori conferme dell’errore di valutazione del Report
Ci sono altre quattro indicazioni del fatto che non ci sia nessun calore in eccesso.
La prima, se si osserva la Figura 12

Figura 12 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 12 del Report di Rothwell

si nota come all’estrema sinistra, prima dell’inizio del primo impulso, la temperatura dell’acqua stia già salendo con una pendenza praticamente identica a quella che poi mantiene per tutto il periodo della prova, fino alla fine del terzo impulso. La stessa cosa è visibile in Figura 6

Figura 6 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 6 del Report di Rothwell

dove si vede che anche la salita della temperatura della parete interna del reattore inizia prima dell’inizio del primo impulso. Ciò dimostra che non è una reazione nucleare innescata dai picchi di potenza elettrica immessa a generare l’innalzamento di temperatura del fluido, ma è lo scambio termico con la temperatura ambiente che si è innalzata rispetto alla notte di circa 3°C come si può vedere dalla Figura 14 (anche se questa si riferisce alla notte successiva). Anche questo punto pare risultare incomprensibile a Rothwell che ha risposto alla questione dicendo che ciò sarebbe contrario al secondo principio della termodinamica.

La seconda indicazione è riportata dallo stesso Rothwell: anche durante il test sottovuoto (che non avrebbe dovuto dare origine a nessun calore in eccesso) si è registrato un notevole “calore in eccesso” (pari a circa 1.5W). Rothwell ritiene che nonostante il vuoto una modesta reazione nucleare abbia avuto luogo. Il fatto che in questo test sottovuoto si sia avuto un innalzamento inferiore di circa 1°C a quello ottenuto nel test effettivo risulta di difficile spiegazione dal momento che non sappiamo in che cosa esattamente i due test differissero. Certamente il fatto che in questo caso si siano utilizzati 5 impulsi anziché 3 (Figura 10)

Figura 10 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 10 del Report di Rothwell

ha portato a un superiore innalzamento della temperatura del sistema che quindi ha poi ricevuto meno calore dall’ambiente. Non si capisce per quale motivo durante questo test si sia deciso di adottare un numero più elevato di impulsi.  Inoltre il fatto che l’ascissa riporti l’indicazione del tempo con riferimento a un’origine non assoluta (cioè non è riportata l’ora), non aiuta a capire in quale momento della giornata i vari test abbiano avuto luogo. Chiaramente, dal momento che lo scambio termico tra aria e sistema è legato alla temperatura dell’aria e questa variava di 2.5°C durante le 24 ore, test eseguiti a ore diverse possono dare innalzamenti diversi della temperatura dell’acqua.

La terza indicazione è costituita dal fatto che in tutti i casi la temperatura del reattore è inferiore (seppure di poco) alla temperatura dell’acqua (si vedano le Figure 8, 13 e 14).

Figura 8 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 8 del Report di Rothwell

Ciò sarebbe un nonsenso se il calore venisse da una reazione nucleare all’interno del reattore, mentre è ovvio se si considera che la temperatura ambiente, più alta durante il giorno quando si eseguono i test, sta cedendo energia all’acqua che circola all’esterno del reattore e del Dewar e da qui il calore si trasmette al reattore che rimane sempre un po’ più freddo.

La quarta indicazione fa sempre riferimento all’analisi della Figura 7.

Figura 7 del Report di Rothwell

Figura 7 del Report di Rothwell

Se si osserva con attenzione l’andamento della temperatura delle pareti del reattore si nota inizialmente il brusco aumento della temperatura a seguito dell’applicazione dell’impulso elettrico, quello che dovrebbe aver innescaro la reazione nucleare. Successivamente la temperatura di parete scende seguendo un transitorio di raffreddamento fino a raggiungere un suo valore di minimo relativo che rappresenta l’esaurimento del transitorio termico. A partire da quel valore di minimo la temperatura di parete dovrebbe rimanere pressoché invariata, ma in realtà questo accade solo per un brevissimo periodo (in corrispondenza del quale invece la temperatura dell’acqua continua a salire con una sua pendenza abbastanza costante) ed in seguito si nota invece che la temperatura di parete riprende ad aumentare seguendo fedelmente l’evoluzione termica della tempertura dell’acqua. Questo comportamento quindi porta a dedurre che sia la temperatura dell’acqua a determinare ed imporre l’evoluzione temporale della temperatura delle pareti del reattore e non il viceversa come invece il Report vorrebbe dimostrare.

Conclusioni
Da quanto esposto si può concludere che la misura eseguita non mostra evidenza di alcun calore anomalo. L’affermazione dell’esistenza di tale calore deriva da una cattiva interpretazione dei dati prelevati sul sistema. Tale errore trova la sua base nel fatto di avere operato sugli stessi dati nell’ipotesi di trovarsi davanti a un sistema molto ben coibentato, e insensibile alle variazioni di temperatura ambiente, nel quale la pompa di circolazione immetteva una potenza trascurabile cose che gli stessi dati dimostrato essere false. Un semplice test calorimetrico sulla sola pompa, suggerito all’autore che lo ha rifiutato, avrebbe immediatamente mostrato l’errore.

Considerazioni addizionali del 06/12/2014

In una sua recente email Jed Rothwell chiede espressamente al Gruppo di citare anche le sue ulteriori considerazioni in essa contenute. Pubblicamo e diamo risposta nel seguito.

JR-1) “…With this method of adiabatic calorimetry the 0.6°C temperature increase over ambient is not included in the calculation of excess heat, because the pump is left on all the time, and it always does the same amount of work, so the temperature is always 0.6°C above ambient. To be specific, with this method, the starting water temperature is subtracted from the ending water temperature, and the starting temperature is already 0.6°C warmer than ambient.
With other methods of calorimetry, heat is measured by comparing the reactor temperature to ambient. With these methods, heat from the pump has to be subtracted from the total, or it will be mistaken for excess heat.

GSVIT-1) Quanto sostiene Rothwell non ci trova d’accordo. La pompa non è stata fermata durante il test ma, per ammissione di Rothwell stesso, stiamo parlando di un incremento di temperatura “differenziale” di +2.5°C e la quantità di calore additivo proveniente dalla pompa va ad incrementare il risultato finale, cioè il Delta T che viene considerato da Rothwell come l’evidenza della presunta produzione di calore anomalo. Questo ovviamente fino al raggiungimento dell’equilibrio termico.

JR-2) “Regarding Fig. 12 you note correctly that the temperature of the water was rising before the first pulse. That is mainly because the ambient temperature was rising.

GSVIT-2) Quanto Rothwell scrive nella sua email conferma esattamente quanto affermato in questo Post e cioè che la costante di tempo esterna del sistema è troppo piccola rispetto al periodo di variazione della temperatura ambiente, tanto è vero che la temperatura dell’acqua (ora per stessa ammissione di Rothwell) varia come conseguenza della variazione della temperatura ambiente.

Nota 1 Come si vedrà nell’analisi, il setup utilizzato da Mizuno prevedeva una pompa centrifuga azionata da motore elettrico della potenza di 12W che lo stesso Mizuno ha misurato assorbire 10W. La potenza immessa nell’acqua da tale pompa è stata completamente trascurata. La motivazione di tale scelta era dovuta al fatto che Rothwell aveva stimato tale potenza in 0.25W. Dalle curve caratteristiche della pompa si ricava che la potenza idraulica che la pompa è in grado di sviluppare è 3W e lo stesso costruttore indica tale potenza come “potenza resa” nel datasheet della pompa. Davanti a tali dati Rothwell ha controbattuto che la pompa lavorava con una portata di 8l/min senza alcuna contropressione, per questo la potenza ceduta era praticamente nulla. La pompa in realtà spingeva l’acqua in una tubazione in plastica della lunghezza di 16m e del diametro di 10mm. Un calcolo approssimato della perdita di carico porta a dire che in quelle condizioni la portata reale era di 1l/min e che la curva (che ha una prevalenza massima di 1m) lavorava alla estrema sinistra della curva. In realtà questa posizione è effettivamente la posizione di minimo assorbimento di potenza per una pompa centrifuga contrariamente a quanto pensasse Rothwell che riteneva che il minimo assorbimento fosse all’estremo destro. In ogni caso, oltre alla potenza resa all’acqua mediante la girante, c’è una parte di calore che viene trasferito dal motore all’acqua tramite l’accoppiamento magnetico utilizzato in questo tipo di pompe, calore che Rothwell dice essere trascurabile senza poter portare alcuna giustificazione a questa sua affermazione. In realtà tenta di supportare tale affermazione asserendo che il motore era caldo, mentre la pompa ad esso collegata era alla temperatura dell’acqua. Tale affermazione è ovvia e chiaramente non può indicare quanto calore stia fluendo dal motore alla pompa, ma tale concetto sembra incomprensibile a Rothwell.
Dal momento che nel setup di Mizuno era presente un vaso Dewar, molto ben isolato termicamente, fu fatta la proposta di effettuare una misura calorimetrica della potenza ceduta dalla pompa all’acqua chiudendo semplicemente il circuito su tale vaso con tubi coibentati i più corti possibili (sarebbe stato opportuno inserire una perdita di carico localizzata pari alla perdita di carico del circuito effettivo in modo da far lavorare la pompa nello stesso punto). Rothwell ha definito tale prova inutile e si è rifiutato di chiedere a Mizuno di eseguirla.
Nota 2 In alternativa è possibile effettuare molte misurazioni della temperatura di tutte le varie parti del sistema che si suppone si trovino a differente temperatura (metodologia tipica dei calorimetri isoperibolici). Questo procedimento ha il vantaggio di non necessitare di un fluido in grado di uniformare la temperatura del sistema, ma prevede di sapere la capacità termica delle varie parti del sistema cosa non sempre semplice o fattibile, per cui la scelta di fare circolare acqua per uniformare la temperatura è pienamente condivisibile.
Nota 3 Anche Rothwell ha tentato in una sua successiva comunicazione di effettuare questo calcolo, ma non è chiaro quale sistema abbia utilizzato, dato che arriva alla conclusione che la potenza dissipata era di soli 0.25W.
Nota 4 Rothwell indica come pompa una Iwaki MD6 a trascinamento magnetico che da datasheet prevede un motore da 22W, poi in una comunicazione privata ci ha fatto sapere che si trattava di una pompa leggermente differente, con motore da 12W.
Nota 5 A questo proposito Rothwell, in una sua successiva stima, conclude che la pompa avrebbe al più erogato una potenza di 0.4W. Non esclude che la potenza effettiva erogata dalla pompa potesse essere anche superiore (non oltre 1W) ma ritiene questa eventualità altamente improbabile.
 Si ringrazia l’autore del Report, Jed Rothwell, per aver autorizzato il GSVIT ad utilizzare liberamente i contenuti del suo documento.

Ulteriore analisi in Appendice al Post

A scopo di verifica di quanto sopra esposto, si è effettuata una simulazione e la ricostruzione delle curve sperimentali di T in funzione del tempo per i test mostrati nelle Figure 14 e 15, utilizzando l’equazione dell’equilibrio termico di un corpo:

– M cP dT + P dt – KT (T – Tenv) dt = 0           (eq.1)

dove:

  • M cP è la Capacità Termica (Massa x Calore Specifico) [J/°C]
  • P è la Potenza [W]
  • KT è la Trasmittanza globale (Trasmittanza x Superficie esterna del sistema) [W/°C]
  • dT è l’intervallo di Temperatuta
  • dt è intervallo di tempo

Introducendo la costante di tempo interna, cT = M cP / KT, l’equazione precedente può essere riscritta anche nel seguente modo:

P/KT dt = cT dT + (T – Tenv) dt           (eq.2)

Per prima cosa si è ricostruito il trend delle curve T body e T dewar, in funzione del tempo, riportato nel grafico Figura 14 a partire dalla sesta ora del test (fase notturna). Le curve sono state ottenute risolvendo numericamente l’equazione (1) con i seguenti parametri:

  • t = 6h → TD = TB = 23.5 °C
  • M cP = 41000 J/°C
  • P = 4 W

La temperatura esterna è stata interpolata per mezzo di più correlazioni lineari per descrivere l’andamento reale. KT invece è stato considerato come parametro di fitting.

Di seguito si riportano i risultati della simulazione ottenuti con KT = 1.95 W/°C  e si mostrano i grafici sovrapposti relativi al test del report Rothwell e alla nostra simulazione:

Figura A1 - Simulazione 22 Ottobre P=4W

Figura A1 – Simulazione 22 Ottobre P=4W

Successivamente, allo stesso modo, sono stati ricostruiti i dati della Figura 15 utilizzando l’equazione (1) riferita rispettivamente al dewar e al body (reattore):

MD cP,D dTD = – KD (TD – Tenv) dt           (eq.3)

MB cP,B dTB = – KB (TB – Tenv) dt           (eq.4)

Si noti che in questo test i termini relativi alle potenze sono nulli (pompa ferma e reattore spento).

Per l’equazione (3) sono stati considerati i seguenti parametri:

  • t = 7.5 h → TD = 25.5 °C
  • MD cP = 13000 J/°C
  • KD = 0.1 W/°C

mentre per l’equazione (4) i seguenti:

  • t = 7.5 h → TB = 25.1 °C
  • MB cP = 28000 J/°C
  • KB = KT – KD = 1.85 W/°C

Di seguito si mostrano i grafici e i risultati ottenuti tramite il modello sopra descritto, come in precedenza, il grafico del test e quello della simulazione sovrapposti:

Figura A2 - Simulazione 21 Ottobre - Pump fails at night P=4W

Figura A2 – Simulazione 21 Ottobre – Pump fails at night P=4W

Si può notare da questo grafico un buon accordo dei risultati del modello con quelli sperimentali, a conferma delle nostre analisi precedentemente esposte nel Post.

Pubblicato in LENR - Mizuno Rothwell | Lascia un commento